To CONQUER their future, Filipinos need to forget the past and get over Martial Law Butthurt

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Paralysed by a pathological fixation on the past.
(Photo source: Interaksyon)

Martial Law crybabies like emphasizing the past. They lament the lack of “accurate” education on the “Martial Law era” and rally around slogans like “Never Forget” and “Never Again”. To be fair, memory of hurt is important so that lessons are learnt. If we don’t remember being burnt we won’t know enough to avoid fires.

There is, however, a thin line that separates coming out of a bad experience a better, more learned person and coming out of one a damaged, paranoid, delusional phobic. It seems members of “civil society” (a.k.a. the “Disente” Crowd) have come out the latter — a people paralysed by fear and unable to move on to explore opportunities and possibilities. This national paralysis underpinned by a pathological need to keep “reminding” everyone within earshot of this national butthurt is expressed ad infinitum and is expertly encapsulated by Inquirer columnist Gideon Lasco in his column today

We see this amnesia in full display today, as we mark another anniversary of Ferdinand Marcos’ imposition of martial law amid the dark clouds of authoritarian rule. How can we so easily forget the price that was paid by our forebears to defend our democracy? How can we so quickly forget the many evils the Herods of our country have done, that we still allow them to rule over us?

It does not occur to old farts like Lasco that there is a reason that young people are held up as the “future” of most modern societies — because the youth’s ability to approach the future with fresh minds is what predisposes them to explore new approaches unencumbered by debilitating emotional baggage borne by, shall we say, more “mature” folk.

Look no further than the way women regard the awful experience of childbirth. Do you think women would go on to have second, third, and fourth (and even more) kids if they remained pathologically paralysed by the memory of such a painful experience as their first childbirth? There is also a reason why young men and women, 17- and 18-year-olds in some cases, make the best soldiers — because they are able to storm a beach, jump off a plane, and discharge their weapons relying entirely on training and less on burdensome experience and time-wasting moral navel-gazing. Teenage love is also such a bittersweet experience precisely because all but the most limpdicked amongst us ignore our parents’ warnings and rush headlong to have a taste of it without regard for the consequences.

It seems the Opposition, led by the Yellowtards, Martial Law Crybabies, and “god-fearing” liberals want an entire nation to lose their mojos in this regard all for the sake of a return to their comfy retirement village they call “civil society”.

There is a strong evolutionary reason people forget or, better still, compartmentalise bad experiences — because a gene pool of butthurt pussies who fail to reproduce, conquer, and kill their enemies quickly goes extinct. If we haven’t noticed yet, the strongest societies on the planet come up with the best love stories, the best war movies, and the best porn. It is because they are collectively wired not just to survive but to conquer and dominate.

In the words of modern-day philosopher Erlich Bachman in the hit HBO series Silicon Valley

Stop being a fncking pussy and start being an asshole.

Are Filipinos wired to conquer and dominate? Not if we allow a political bloc that aspires to turn Filipinos into pussies to regain political power.

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19 Comments on “To CONQUER their future, Filipinos need to forget the past and get over Martial Law Butthurt”

  1. His wife dropped the Sabah claim from Malaysia, and dump Bataan Nuclear power Plant project, a 400 million dollars Loan from Japan and reloan it now to 600 million and Blame APO Lakay Marcos for 32 year’s of yellow Oligarchs Corykot Mahjong of drawing and Making the Philippines Third World Country.

  2. The only glolry that the world gives to the Aquinos is the non-violent of removal of dictator Marcos (the benevolent or the brutal and ruthless depending on whose side the descriptiom is coming from).

    When the facts are in and the nearest to the truth are known to the world, then the Aquino myth will be what is truly is.

  3. While I believe it was time for Marcos to be deposed and Cory was probably the only one who could have orchestrated it, the resultant yellow movement has been an unmitigated disaster for this sh*thole of a country and I’ll be glad to get back to civilization (not soon enough).

  4. I see criticism of this government because apparently it is racking up debt for ‘dutertenomics’. I feel that this “debt-phobia” is in the same vein as this martial law phobia you mentioned. In order to get ourselves out of this rut we buried ourselves in, we need to find and spend money. Yes, these old farts keep harping on about this debt that the young will pay. Yes, the young will pay for it. Of course, it is implied that this money being borrowed will go into infrastructure and other acquisitions. Yes, we risk not getting our money’s worth because some politician demands his grease money. But these old farts complaining about this debt will have no use for it since they’d be dead or by the time the project is completed, or too rich to be riding new trains anyway. Therefore, let the young pay off the loans used to build the projects meant to benefit them, make them more productive and healthy and stay vigilant with your money. No use in being paralyzed with this phobia. After all, in a culture where people are willing to incur a debt to buy the latest iPhone X or to fund the next fiesta, paying a little more in tax to have better roads, infrastructure and education which will last another 50 years should be nothing to sweat about right?

    P.S. you misspelled conquer in paragraph 7, final sentence.

    1. Indeed, going into debt should be seen as a vote of confidence for the future; i.e. that this future would be a bright enough one that would bear the fruit needed to pay off the debt while reaping the benefits of the assets the development of which was funded by said debt.

      As you pointed out, that this generation of activist pussies necessarily see debt as all bad illustrates this lack of the cojones needed to succeed in today’s world order.

      [Thanks, by the way. I’ve corrected the misspelling. ๐Ÿ™‚ ]

    2. You appear to be saying that because Filipinos at large are happy to waste money on useless shit that they can’t afford, the government should do the same thing on a larger scale?

      Debt can only be paid back if you invest it in something that generates wealth. Since Filipinos don’t even grasp the fundamental concept of investment (ie., money+hard work = more money), how do you think large-scale borrowing is likely to end up? Remember what happened in 2008?

      1. “You appear to be saying that because Filipinos at large are happy to waste money on useless shit that they canโ€™t afford, the government should do the same thing on a larger scale?”
        No, just pointing out the irony that many of these whiners and “phobics”, while speaking out about increased government spending on infrastructure, education and capacity building, have no problem going into debt for the latest trinket or walwalan. Once you are confronted with this realization, a borrowing/spending spree for more trains, schools, ports, plants and factories becomes an easier sell.

        “Remember what happened in 2008?”
        2008 had nothing to do with government spending/borrowing. On the other hand, the the Post World War II supremacy of the US had something to do with the government spending needed to counteract the crash of ’29 and spending needed to exact revenge for 12/07.

        1. That reasoning might be valid if the government were actually spending money on capacity-building. As far as I am aware, it is not:

          – Duterte just announced free (=worthless) university education in a country where 99% of young people don’t have the personal or academic wherewithal to study at that level. So that’s a whole load of money that’s going to be wasted.

          – There is no coherent plan for a 21st-century transport infrastructure; and in any case, without business-friendly laws, such infrastructure would not pay for itself.

          – “Capacity building” is not the job of government. If they would simply correct the ridiculous methods of tax collection, businesses would be able to fund their own capacity-building.

          Those vast Chinese loans are actually being used as they were in the Marcos years: on stupid projects that have no purpose except to funnel cash into the right pockets. This is no secret. It gets regularly reported in the national press.

          What happened in 2008 fundamentally had to do with giving money that didn’t exist to people who had neither the intention nor the capability to turn it into real wealth.

          Filipinos are the ultimate money-sink: you could invest a million pesos in any random Filipino and he’d turn up on your doorstep a week later asking for a loan until pay-day. No, Filipinos need to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. Only then will they value the results. If they don’t want to do that, then too bad.

  5. So are you saying the Filipino inability to learn anything, ever, from prior experience is some sort of evolutionary advantage?

    It doesn’t look like it from where I’m standing.

      1. Well, “getting over” something and “forgetting” it are not the same thing. Rwandans got over the genocide. They damn well haven’t forgotten it.

        Filipinos keep on voting for crooks, idiots, and liars, it seems to me, precisely because they DO have the memory of a goldfish when it comes to historical events. Or, worse, they rewrite what happened last time to justify whatever mistake they made this time.

  6. The Martial Law fear is ingrained in the consciousness of non thinking Filipinos, because of the Fake News , that became Fake History, written in our textbooks, as ordered by the Aquino Cojuangco political axis.

    We are all Brainwashed by this Fear of Marcos’ Martial Law. It is the “Bogeyman” of the Aquino Cojuangco political axis, to keep them in power. All their propaganda machines, and their “hakot demonstrator activists” , are working overtime, to frighten us by this “Marcos’ Martial Law Bogeyman”, so that we all cannot move on…

    Anybody who have this Fear of Martial Law, should go and drag the two political opportunists: Enrile and Ramos. They are still alive and kicking. Torture them, until they will shout to high heavens, what they had done to the Filipinos, during Martial Law. They were in charged of Marcos’ Martial Law, during the time of Marcos Sr.

    However, these running dogs of the Aquino Cojuangco political axis, who are paid and “Hakot Demonstrator activists”, or politicians, who have self serving agendas, find it fit for them, that Marcos Martial Law is a good tool, for them, to further their political agendas. Frighten and trigger the Emotions of the dumb Filipino voters, and capture their votes !

  7. These people should learn how to read first. It’s been stated many times. Martial Law during the Marcos administration compared to now is different. The answer is right there in front of them. Do they honestly think we would have a Marcos-style Martial Law with a legislature still up and running? Last I checked, the congress was alive… and stalling progress.

    1. During Martial Law, Congress is unicameral and now, we’re still bicameral with the Congress and Senate still intact. What’s the problem with them?

    1. Now now… Anger will do you no good here. You’ll just come across like any other garden-variety Yellowtard — all anger, zero substance. Just like that last limpdicked September 21 “rally”. ๐Ÿ˜€

    2. Forget about what exactly?

      That’s what happens when we try to correct the past by just sticking to it rather to create a HOPE of a future.

      Take your shitposting to someone else, fam.

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