Filipinos cannot progress because of an anti-elite mentality

Thanks to Senator Lito Lapid, Filipinos can continue wallowing in mediocrity and be proud of it. The Senator was lauded by many for his verdict speech, which a lot of melodramatic Filipinos found “touching”. In that speech he proudly justified his guilty verdict in the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Renato Corona which he claims he issued using his “conscience”. Here is some of the feedback about his speech on Twitter:

Bianca Valerio: “Lito Lapid: In fairness to his disclaimers-not having speech prepared, not speaking good English,etc. Disarming w/ Humor-his tool of choice.”

And

Miriam Quiambao: “I have new respect for Sen Lito Lapid.”

I find the praises Lapid received so irritating. It’s bad enough that most Filipinos are anti-elite; Lapid has somehow institutionalized the Filipino mindset that it is okay not to aim for excellence. A good proportion of the Philippine population now prefer that our public servants be seen as being one with the common tao rather than be seen as one of the elites.

School children who have a habit of cutting classes or who consider themselves too “cool” for school will now have a valid excuse to stay away from school after Lapid emphasized that he is a simple high-school graduate who found himself judging a Supreme Court Judge. Lapid made it look so easy, indeed. Impressionable kids are probably thinking that they just need to become actors to make it in Congress. But not everyone can be a celebrity. One has to possess the right look or the right connection before one can become a star. So if you are not photogenic or artistic, you actually need to work on your intellect to achieve something in life.

What’s with all the anti-elite sentiment that Filipinos are fond of wallowing in? Filipinos have this misguided notion that being a member of the elite is a bad thing. It is actually this kind of victim mentality that keeps us from moving forward. This is one of the reasons why Corona was so unpopular to the public. And it is why some Filipinos consider Senator Miriam Santiago a lunatic. It is even a miracle that she, a brilliant lawyer, got elected into office since a lot of our elected public servants actually got voted into office by over-using the line that they are “pro-poor”. Let’s not forget to mention Erap Estrada whose slogan “Erap para sa Mahirap” in 1998 so resonated with the masses that he almost won the presidency again in the 2010 election.

Being one of the elite members of society doesn’t necessarily mean membership in one of the wealthiest families in the country. Being a member of the elite means you are from “a select group of people with, intellect, wealth, specialized training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are those whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously or carry the most weight or those who view their own views as so; whose views and/or actions are most likely to be constructive to society as a whole; or whose extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom render them especially fit to govern”.

They say that the personal characteristics of those considered to be a member of the elite include: “rigorous study of, or great accomplishment within a particular field; a long track record of competence in a demanding field; an extensive history of dedication and effort in service to a specific discipline (e.g., medicine or law) or a high degree of accomplishment, training or wisdom within a given field”. Only a small percentage of Filipinos can fit that description and unfortunately, the likes of Lapid are making it even smaller.

In defense of the true elites

I don’t know about you but if I ever have to undergo brain or heart surgery, I want the best surgeons to perform the operation. Who in their right mind would want to see a quack doctor to cure their disease?

If the Taliban or any member of the Al Qaeda ever kidnaps me, I can already picture Navy-Seals-like commandos barging in through the doors of the Taliban hideout where they are keeping me and rescue me safely. Why would I want the Philippine National Police (PNP) undergoing the rescue operation? They will just bungle the operation and I might end up in a bag destined for the morgue.

If I ever have to hire a lawyer to counter a libel case, I want someone who was a bar topnotcher and who wins most of his court cases. And if I ever have to be in front of a judge, I will pray that it be someone who was also a bar top notcher, won most of his cases, and is compassionate. Why would I want to hire a two bit lawyer who was average in the bar exam and who only settled his cased out of court? I would definitely end up losing my case, land in jail and pay a fine.

It should follow that if I ever have to vote for a president of my country…well, I will never vote for someone as mediocre as President Noynoy Aquino. Life is too short to put my trust in people like him who waste people’s time learning on the job while millions go to bed hungry every night.

If someone considered me snobbish and elitist for choosing excellence over mediocrity, I would definitely take it as a compliment because my definition of an elite person is someone who is the best of the best and not someone who is just a member of the privileged group. The two should not be confused as one and the same. The former group is good and beneficial to society while the latter just takes advantage of the underprivileged for their own benefit. They also enjoy a relatively large degree of control over a society’s means of production, and includes those who gain their position via means afforded by their social class and not as a result of personal achievement (read: the Philippine oligarchy).

If I have to choose between talking to someone who knows what he or she is talking about and someone who just pretends to be in the know, I would definitely choose the former. How I wish the country could have more of the former because it is really nice to have a conversation with someone who understands what you are saying and someone you can actually learn from as opposed to having a discussion with people who talk like they actually know what they are talking about when in reality they’d much prefer to just keep the conversation going around in circles.

Being anti-elite is what’s preventing our country from progressing. It’s what gets actors, athletes, singers or anyone from the entertainment industry and anyone with a popular name like Aquino getting voted into public office even if they don’t have any “extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom that render them especially fit to govern.”

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271 Comments on “Filipinos cannot progress because of an anti-elite mentality”

  1. Filipinos who are like this don’t want to be led, and likely want to disregard the rule of law. They want “anything goes” for their lives.

    1. yes may point ka nga pero thing is kung walang ganyang tao na nakaupo the public masa would care less and assume na dahil puro elite mga nakaupo walang makikinig samin, walang nakakaintindi samin, etc. It’s about representation, and in your article as someone who’s in a higher status you might see it that way but i doubt ganyan ang tingin ng mga mahihirap sa kanya.

      you might say “pwede naman maging emphatic pa rin towards sa masa kahit na mataas na antas ang narating/matalino/etc” but it won’t work like someone who is actually like them.

      Lito Lapid should be more cautious about what he says though, he must serve as a channel for the less educated to PROPERLY understand how the impeachment works. I mean if I were President i would make it a point to have someone of that status have a seat in public office, but of course make sure that he is capable of doing his job.

      1. This article is so dis-jointed in its argument that it is comedic rather than profound.The author starts off seemingly perturbed by the adoration of Lito Lapid by the massa.Stumbles along to the conclusion that the best of the best is somehow not what most Filipino’s want in their elected officials,when that is what they are supposed to be.At the same time contradicting the reality that being among the elite in the Philippines means exactly what the author states it is not(a dose of reality seems called for!)!!! which is a member of a politically powerful family.Stating blindly that “They say an elite member of society is…”,while at the same time leaving out who ‘they’ are,what strata of society she is referring to and just EXACTLY how she misguidedly arrived at such a cock-eyed,dissmissive conclusion.Lito Lapid was embarrassing to watch with his insipid,ill-prepared remarks and while it is understood that the author is pained to see the likes of him in public office that she fails to see that he cast his vote in his favored direction,showed up to do his job,did his job as he is paid to do and at the same time gave hope to some members of the society he represents(the un-educated,mostly poor)a little hope that maybe they too,the un-eductaed and mostly poor,can attain a prominent position in that society without being a member of a familial political dynasty(the fact that he was an actor is not lost).The authors condesending remarks of Sen.Lapid reflect a snobbishly educated point of view coupled with the ignorance that could only be attached to someone that is somehow fortunate enough to have passed a few exams despite an obvious lack of expressing a coherent stance on the issue presented.So much so that the only really substantive thing that rings true is her ironic closing statement,”in life things are often not what they seem”,indeed.

        1. *Sigh*

          Another point misser. Do me a favor and just read my rebuttals on the comment thread because I’ve already explained my point ad nauseum. If you don’t agree with the article, that’s ok. Stay happy with the likes of Lito Lapid as one of your “distinguished” public servants. Let’s see where they take the country in the years to come.

          PS. Please break your sentences into paragraphs next time.

    2. Do not reduce issues to class struggle and do not justify mediocrity as pro-people. Until we realize that for as long as we embrace this kind of mentality, we will forever wallow in the morass of underdevelopment, dependency and complacent mediocrity.

      I don’t agree with the examples cited such as Carpio et al. The author, if indeed was elitist enough in lieu of a careful study, should have realized that the issue has already been settled before through the expositions of Plato in his work The Republic. What is needed in leadership is character. Intelligence, education and experience is only a part of what makes an ideal character to govern a state. A leader of character is blind to class stratification and does not include in his or her vocabulary the word “elite” or “masa”.

      But we don’t get it because our trapos murk the issue by stupid generalities such as “puso”, “masa”, “makatao” and all that shit. Most of us, being mediocre and under educated have an aversion to serious dialogues about governance and instead prefer leaders who are nice (they have to be especially when they are inept) but corrupt.

      Governance in this country is more mediocre and more corrupt than you realize. I’ve seen it.

      1. In a way, it can be reduced to a class struggle. The Philippines reminds me of the Roman Empire less wealth plundered from other nations.

      2. Whether marunong man yan o hinde, they still have the potential to be corrupt. Those you refer possessing the right character are just one in a million. And we might not be able to find one in this lifetime. So I agree with the author on choosing the elite ones. Pumili ka, leader na corrupt pero marunong o leader na corrupt na walang alam?

  2. It’s disheartening, very disheartening, that we continue to commend people who are misfit for their positions. There’s nothing wrong with being undereducated, but being a senator, being a judge, and holding a position that requires knowledge and wisdom, is not meant for people like Lapid.

    1. I disagree. What knowledge and wisdom is necessary in the impeachment trial when everybody including the public can easily formulate their opinion?

      1. Completely missing the point. True knowledge and wisdom can be found in logic and reason than any rhetoric. Everyone is manipulated in one opinion, thanks to the media.

      2. @jonas

        Attending impeachment trials is not the only job of a Senator. They also do a lot of legislative work, which means “knowledge” and “wisdom” is necessary for the job.

        1. @jonas

          Well, they are not legislating when they are sitting as judges in the impeachment court.

          Does that mean they do not need “wisdom” and “knowledge” while they are judges in the impeachment court?

          Really, some people need to quit while they are ahead.

        2. @jonas but being a judge is not the only job of a senator. Since knowledge and wisdom is necessary to most of their responsibilities, they are also expected to present that as judge assuming they have that knowledge and wisdom

        3. Like I said, they are not legislating when sitting as judges in the impeachment court. The word is ‘legislating’.

          Do they need wisdom and knowledge for that? Of course! What activity do not require wisdom and knowledge? Even crossing a street you need wisdom and knowledge.

        4. Hi jonas este, sanjo. It’s not surprising that you are just one person because you use the same line of argument – mostly flawed. You can’t deny it because you share the same IP address. 😉

          Do they need wisdom and knowledge for that? Of course! What activity do not require wisdom and knowledge? Even crossing a street you need wisdom and knowledge.

          So what is your point? I think you’ve lost it because your first comment says this:

          What knowledge and wisdom is necessary in the impeachment trial when everybody including the public can easily formulate their opinion?

          Ta-ta!

        5. I did not miss your point,you missed mine:completely.I did not vote for Lapid,and he is an embarrassment,but not anymore than Santiago,and you seem to think she is not seriously ill?Even though her illness is affecting her so badly that she missed part of the trial.Your P.S. to me about punctuation,as if I care or have the time to indent,accentuates MY POINT.Your snoberry is what makes you un-intelligent.GET IT?

        6. @Benny

          Santiago’s health is not a 100%, yes. But that is because she has high-blood pressure. She could not attend some of the sessions but that doesn’t mean she didn’t watch the live telecast. Besides, she was present for most of the sessions.

          You only think she has a mental illness because you don’t like the way she berates the prosecution and their cohorts. Her behavior towards the prosecution was quite understandable. They deserved to be admonished for violating the rights of the defendant.

          Your P.S. to me about punctuation,as if I care or have the time to indent,accentuates

          That is proof that you do not want to put in the extra effort even with the little things that you do. You seem to be advocating mediocrity.

          Despite your objection to what you think was Miriam’s “rude” behavior, you also show your own arrogance by not even bothering to use the right communication tools. You expect others to adjust to the way you write instead of following the rules of communicating using a particular language.

          Your snoberry is what makes you un-intelligent

          That doesn’t even make any sense. Advocating for the rule of law and excellence in our society does not equate to being a snob.

      3. Ilda,

        You are way way up cloud nine. Come down a little bit and see what LegalizeIT was saying. Go look and feel the non-elite sentiments. Perhaps you might re-define elite.

        I dislike the term “elite.” It is unnerving; it is unsettling because in my mind mostly of us dwell too much with the class system in the Philippines.

        Yes, you can call me anti-class system dude, but definitely not anti-elitist because anti-elitest exists only within the elite community.

        1. @Jackass

          The fact that you think the term “elite” is unnerving is proof that you missed the point of the article.

          Anyone can become a member of the “elite”. You just have to achieve something significant.

          There are also many ways to become a member of the elite. Some people use shortcuts and some people have enough discipline to undergo rigorous study of or great accomplishment within a particular field; gain a long track record of competence in a demanding field; accumulate extensive history of dedication and effort in service to a specific discipline (e.g., medicine or law) or obtain a high degree of accomplishment, training or wisdom within a given field.

          Do not be too narrow-minded.

    2. Very good point, just having looks and status does not qualify you for a high level in government but who in government will set guidelines for qualifications? Miriam Defensor on her never-ending crusade to fight corruption but where’s the implementation of legislation to fix the many problems, amazing how many stars are in office but really how effective can they truly be if they have so much on their plates.

  3. I wouldn’t say people are really “anti-elite”. They probably find comfort in what Lapid brings. The lack of education in our country and the continuous oppression of the poor might be the cause of what you’re trying to point out here. There’s a difference in being an elite and being an actual leader.

    1. i do agree with this. we should try to be careful with the word use of elite. i can’t emphasize enough that what our country needs are people with atleast college degree (education) and experience of public service (passion).

      1. I’ve been watching the impeachment trial and see Lapid lul over his corner. However, on the finale of this fiasco, Lapid used “empathy/conscience” to guide his vote. He didn’t even know what a pie graph is. Some people find it funny, some people find it stupid. However, for the masses it worked. Lapid brings the simple White&Black world to the office which makes the masses vote for him.

    2. @Lasavoy

      i would have to disagree with you because i honestly believe that competence and capability to hold and handle office should always be more important than just making the masses feel comfortable with who’s seated in a position of power.

      yes it’s more important to make the masses feel like they’re well represented, but how can they be represented well if their representative is incompetent?

  4. Being an accomplished human being is not anti elite. Erap Estrada and Lapid, both adhere to the Populist Politics…not new in political field. It was used here in the U.S. ,in the early thirties, before the American Depression came in. Most of the American voters were poor…so these populist politicians, project themselves, as poor and uneducated…to get the voters attentions and votes. It’s deceiving the poor voters, to get themselves elected. Erap Estrada and Lapid are not poor. Look at their lifestyles. They are good Actors, who acted like poor. And the gullible Filipino voters believed and elected them.

    1. So you probably mean that these two used their “acting skills” to win the heart of the masses? I’m impressed and disgusted at the same time. No more actors/actresses on the ballot. The same goes for everyone. 😀

      1. Most Politicians hone their skills in acting, to get votes. Actors, comedians,showBiz people, etc…do that naturally. It’s their professions. So, in elections…what seems to be real to you, in election campaings is not real…what is said by these people, must be disected with common sense…look what thye’ve done, and their accomplishment records…ask questions…

  5. The point of the article is well said concerning the elites on who can be identified as such. The problem though is the considerable number of elite themselves prefer to keep the masses down and I cannot completely blame the mindset of the masses. What the masses needed would be a dedicated part of the elite to guide them through. Surely there would be a realization to a part of the population that can lead to an awakening. Life is not black & white, to find a reasonable agreement between the elite and the masses is a must.

  6. Being a member of the elite means you are from “a select group of people with, intellect, wealth, specialized training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are those whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously or carry the most weight or those who view their own views as so; whose views and/or actions are most likely to be constructive to society as a whole; or whose extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom render them especially fit to govern” –

    WTF… ” those views… carry the most weight…”.
    ” whose extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom…” Superhero…???

  7. dapat talaga magi martial law at pagkukuhain ang mga kayamanan nila at ibigay sa mga mahihirap nating kababayan

    1. Unfair naman yun. Ikaw ba matutuwang kunin ang pinag hirapan mong pera at pag-aari at ibigay sa ibang tao?

      Ikaw ba matutuwang lahat ng ipinamana mo sa anak at maging sa apo mo ay mapupunta lang sa mga di mo man lang kakilala?

  8. It so depressing to be a Filipino. And yes, tinatamaan ako because more often than not tempting laziness and reliance on the “bahala na” attitude takes over like hell.
    Depressing…

  9. Pinoys don’t like thinking period. Look at shows that rate. Look at circulation of Tagalog only newspapers . You see very little critical thinking in those Tagalog only media. Although the English PDI is barely more respectable . This is not an original thought but BS Aquino connected with pinoys with his emo campaign. He never was of any real use. He had the right mom who died at the right time.

  10. Mas gusto ko si Lapid
    kesa kay Miriam. Si
    Lapid mababa ang
    pinag-aralan at hindi
    magaling sa English pero hindi siya naging bastos sa
    pagpapaliwanag ng
    kanyang boto sa Senado.
    Hindi siya naging bully,
    mayabang at hambog na
    gaya ni Miriam. Simple lang ang paliwanag siya at
    direct to the point. Minsan mas okay na yung
    walang pinag aralan na
    may puso kesa naman
    edukado na walang puso.

    1. Fishball, you are a complete dumb-fvck.

      You have already lost every argument you will ever put up. It is clear you prefer the easy way out of just mouthing off what has been prepared for you instead of taking the intelligent route of thinking things over before making a statement.

      Ika nga, kumakain ka na lang ng isinuka na ng iba, imbes na magluto ng sariling kakainin.

      You are the reason why Filipinos never got any better after 1986.

      1. and you sir, Hugh, are example of the rich and educated who wold take advantage of the poor. this is why we get to comment is because we are allowed to voice our opinion. i don’t think there is anything dumb about what fishball said although i don’t fully agree with it. he has a point, Senator Lapid took the too honest road to relay the reason of his vote while Senator Miriam on the other hand, use her intellect. these 2 Senators seem to be in both extreme end of the sprectrum and too much of something is never good. if we have Lapid’s passion and Santiago’s brain then maybe Philippines can get somewhere.

        1. Fishball never fails to amaze me with such logic and rhetoric combined, lasang-lasa ko ang fishball sa kabilang kanto. We are free to voice out our opinion but some of it are just plainly preposterous. Excuse me, saging lang ang may puso, ok? LOL

        2. We are free to express opinion, but stating facts and truths are more better because when you state an opinion, you can’t even tell what is truth and what is fiction.

        3. Right on the spot. I don’t really agree with Fishball sometimes but come to think of it, he has a point.

          I totally agree with you that we need a person who has passion and intellect at the same time to guide this country. But I doubt if these type of rare people exists today in this environment. 🙂

        4. @philippineslive,

          How ther hell am I supposed to take advantage of the poor when I already lose enough money to taxes that are used to keep people poor?

          The poor in the Philippines WANT to remain poor, going by the way they elect the likes of Lapid. He not any more honest than a pedophile in a nursery school, because he markets his own stupid, un-improved self as the best example of leader there is.

          I am well-off not by anyone else’s sweat but my own. Perhaps you buy into that “oh we must share our blessings” BS that the priests peddle all the time? You and Lapid should hang out and let him rant about how his wife got caught smuggling money into the US. Honest Senator Lapid my as$.

      2. fishball- lapid insulted all of us even though he did not say any bad words. he insulted all of Filipino Citizens by declaring his ignorance of the law. your reasoning is so emo dude

    2. Right and you even applauded Noynoy for his repeated attacks against Corona during his impeachment. Isn’t THAT bullying.

      Such hypocrisy. 😛

      1. It is futile to weigh which is better or not. It depends on how you want your statements to be. Opinions are not misleading nor it covers the truth. That’s why it is called an opinion because it is personal and expect it to be biased of course. Why do you think there is a separate page for opinions in broadsheets?

    3. My golay people Fishball’s brain does not warrant any carbohydrate’s worth, figuratively speaking… and it just reeks 2 years and 5 months langsa figuratively speaking — it’s all full of worms and gadfly so could you all still be surprised by that writing? :pwe:

  11. I am relieve to read an article like this because it makes me feel that there is still hope from our fellow Filipinos to make good choices on the people who fits to sit in any government offices. Although, it is enough that there is a disparity between the poor and the rich in our country, using the word elite and non-elite just even brings down hope for the poor. The point I want to make is that Senator Lapid should have not been so proud to say that he is only a high school graduate when there are Filipinos who strive to go to school finish 4-year college even if their parents cannot afford because they want to make something of themselves. I think, it is not difficult to ask to have mayors, governors, congressman, senators, vice-presidents and presidents to run our coutnry to have a college degree as a standard unspoken requirement. We filipinos tend to get confuse so easily when important people in our country have betrayed us and unfortunately, these people are not only like ex-President Joseph Estrada who we probably expected to fail anyway due of his lack of education but why even former President Gloria Macapagal is put in scrutiny because of corruption when she fits perfectly of what can save Philippines from an economic disaster would have been an most elite of presidents of them all but yet had managed to put former chief justice Corona to where he is now. Another unfortunate truth is though, between these 2 ex-presidents, inspite of their alleged corruption, former President Gloria had more good things than ex-President Erap brought to the tiny growth for the country such as aggressive borrowing money to pay old debts and providing more jobs were bold decisions for some who knows about more than simple economics but somehow, sadly she didn’t deliver in the end leaving Filipinos heart-broken once again. Education and passion for our country is the key no matter if you came from nowhere or from the most prestigious family.

      1. im sorry fishball that that happened to FPJ but yet again, i don’t understand about the sympathy on wanting a dropped out of high school to be the President who represents the country and meets all these pretigious people all over the world such as President Barack Obama, Prime Minister David Cameron, Preseident Hu Jintao, and even what an insult to someone like the President of Nigeria who atleast had college degree. I’m not saying the rich or educated can bully the poor and uneducated, but as for FPJ, he should have showed some responsibility to accept he is no near qualified run the country and should have not run in the first place. i mean i can some what tolerate ex-President Erap and Senator Lapid that inspite of lack of education they served or proved somehow their what may be passion for the country by starting serving the as mayor and vice-governor, repsectively.

    1. So what if it was rigged? Eh ngayon may nagbago ba?
      MOVE ON! GET OVER IT!
      Sabihan mo bossing mo na mag trabaho. Pag ginawa nya un, masisisyahan pa lahat, otherwise, shut up!

    2. I’m not the one who complain, Mr.Utak-Squatter. But do you have any evidence to back up your claim? Honestly, you’re very happy to be… IMMATURE. 😛

    3. Translation: Sana artista ulet manalo sa election para puede paren ako mangarap, makapagtayo den ng mansion sa province.

  12. For me, what I saw in Sen. Lapid’s guilty verdict is a representation of the case from another angle coming from somebody who comes from what I consider a large segment of our society, the masa.

    Contrary to what I read here, there is really nothing ‘touchy’ about his decision except the fact that he emphasized who he is rather than what his decision is all about. And I can’t blame him. That is the game that elites like him play in our society. Yes, Lito Lapid, like Erap, is an elite. He maybe uneducated, like Erap, but he belonged to a class or group of people who are influential in our society to be categorized as elite.

    In his speech, Lito has to emphasize his lack of intelligence or education to remind everyone of what and who he is compared with everyone in the Senate Hall. Even compared with both the prosecution and the defense panel. And that is what makes him an elite. Just look at Erap. He is for the masa but, like Lapid, he is not masa. You many not believe it, but both actors are elites.

    Erap and Lapid’s kind of elite is largely dependent on them being for the masa. That is their secret weapon. Them being underdogs is what makes them the elite of the masa.

    The more they are seen as different from traditional or professional politicians the more the masa embraces them. The more they show empathy, sympathy and oneness with masa, the more they are seen as one of them. The more their eliteness is strengthened. Deceptive scheme but very effective. In the Senate. Lapid is with the likes of Miriam, Cayetano, Drilon, Arroyo, Legarda, Lacson, etc. all lawyers, professionals, educated, rich and elites. One would really assume that Lapid is not. But isn’t he really?

    So you ridicule him, insult him and make fun of him because he does not belonged. He represents lack of intelligence in our society. Uneducated, etc. He gets all the flak and embarrassment because he is the stupid one. The underdog. But the funny thing was, he’s comfortable with it.

    Did I see wisdom or accord respect with Lapid’s decision? Nah. For me, like the rest of the members of the Senate, it’s just another decision against an elite coming from another elite.

    1. It may be hard to swallow but our country is already run by the Bourgeoisie, accept it or not. Being somesort of “anti-elite” just sprouted because people were oppressed. I’m not saying all the elites are matapobre, however, most of them are. People try to find someone who can sympathize and be one with them. Sadly, this technique is also being used by the elite to keep the our government in control (showcasing rags-to-riches stories). If ever a non-elite reaches a high position, I’m pretty sure the “elites” themselves will try to work him/her around so just they could remove him. Again, the main point is, we need a Leader, whatever class he or she has come from. Speaking fluently English doesn’t instantly make you a genius anyway, and yes I’m not speaking in behalf of Lapid, I don’t like that guy either.

    2. I like this comment of yours better, sanjo. A bit emo pero better than yung post mo dun sa isang article. I think I understand you better.

      I agree that it always has been a battle between the elites. But I disagree with you that Erap and Lapid are for the masa. Erap claims to be for the poor while he chugged on his Petrus and Blue Labels? Kamown! Lapid? At least he wasn’t seen with his excesses.

      Erap and Lapid positioned themselves to be viewed as the “non-elite” elite. I can attribute the positioning success mainly to their roles in their old movies. They had the image of authenticity backing them up. And then there’s Mar Roxas’ pedicab ad — AUTHENTIC.

      And Lapid is or isn’t? All I know is he’s one hell of a floater/survivor. How many graft cases were thrown at the guy back when he was still with the gov’t of Pampanga? If those allegations were true, then it would be easy for him to put a mudguard on all his vehicles with the print “Katas ng Lahar.”

      Lapid is not being ridiculed as the PERSON. What is being ridiculed is the perceived attitude of NOT CHOOSING TO IMPROVE.

      I have high regard for Lapid’s stunt skills and tremendous ability to shoot 2 people with only one bullet. He’s one hell of an actor, too. He’s also a ladies man himself. He even made out with Gov. V. Oo, di ako nahihiyang aminin na nakapanood ako ng pelikula nya.

  13. thanks that the impeachment trials were being publicized, at lest i’m in the right tract to know of how and who among senators really have the intellect, capable and who are not fit to be.

  14. What Lapid is saying and what he is appealing to is the masa culture of being allergic to learning. It speaks to their values. Values of enjoying and worshiping the moronic. That is why we won’t progress. People seek people who are dumb. On TV and in the ballot box and then we wonder why we are where we are. If you have read me here one of my main themes is that the Pinoy will do anything for pansin. Which is why everybody went out of chacter pretending to appreciate Efren Penaflorida 3 years ago. Not for his against the grain pinoy stance but he because he brought us pansin.

    http://cornholiogogs.multiply.com/journal/item/1017

    1. Well, I’m pretty sure that Lapid won’t be conferred an honorary degree in English anytime soon.

      What’s scary for me is this. If a known leader claims to be ignorant and doesn’t give a damn about it, what message will that send to our younger generation?

      I remember when I was in first grade elementary class. I had an argument with classmate over a spelling quiz. I marked his answer wrong. He was filled with so much conviction that the right way to spell ONE was W-A-N. Blame a TV ad for that. I oneder what happened to him.

  15. Your comment ignores the undeniable fact that a great majority of Filipinos are not from the “elite class”. Senator Lapid does not revel in his ignorance. He shows what one can achieve in spite of it. Sorry to say this but denigrating the non-elite does not make you part of the elite you so obviously envy.

    1. No argument that most people are not from there. But did he fulfill his role as a Senator/ Judge by basically telling the court fact finding process to “F” themselves since all that did not register anyway in his evaluation process. Then use his speech to play to the masa then render a verdict anyway. The whole process of coming up with a verdict was a lot like Lapid’s academic record. A joke. And do you really believe the masa is better served? And you consider him taking up space and still delivering an uniformed opinion as an achievement ? I hate to see your defintion of epic fail.

    2. IMO, both Penoy and Lito Lapid did not really dream to be a president or a senator respectively. They just happened to be in the right time persons.

  16. though based on set standards, Lapid and co. may seem mediocre. and according to set standards, your so called elites fit the position. the question is, who among the elites in our government in the last few decades has done the right thing to give the people the hope they’ve been looking for? Cory, Ramos, Marcos, Gloria?…

    i think we cant blame the masses. for many of your so called elites has destroyed their reputation by bringing the masses to their present painful status. thus, naturally people tends to look for other means to acquire an honest and patriotic leadership other than the basis of having elites who only used their intellect to abuse the less fortunate.

    therefore i think being an elite as the main basis for any government position is a mediocre mentality itself. for being a public servant seemed requiring more on having a true patriotism and true leadership as an effective tool than just being sharp in all areas of theoretical applications.

    most great men in the world became great not by following the already set standards made by the fools, but rather they have stood to set new standards where they believed is right and carried such principles by heart.

    1. though based on set standards, Lapid and co. may seem mediocre. and according to set standards, your so called elites fit the position. the question is, who among the elites in our government in the last few decades has done the right thing to give the people the hope they’ve been looking for? Cory, Ramos, Marcos, Gloria?…

      The so-called brilliant ones had to deal with the cards they were given. How can you implement changes when you have the media vilifying you or the threat of a coup d’etat distracts you from doing your job? None of the allegations against GMA were proven but she still has the reputation of being corrupt. If there were corrupt public servants during her time, did she conspire with all of them? If she didn’t, then she is getting all the blame while the rest are getting away with their crime. Worse, some of them are now allied with PNoy. The people can’t even tell the difference anymore because they believe the media too much.

      i think we cant blame the masses. for many of your so called elites has destroyed their reputation by bringing the masses to their present painful status. thus, naturally people tends to look for other means to acquire an honest and patriotic leadership other than the basis of having elites who only used their intellect to abuse the less fortunate.

      Oh, but we can blame the masses, some of middle class and some of the elite members of Philippine society. They allowed themselves to be used by politicians who have done nothing in the past but still got elected. Why did Lapid get re-elected when he wasn’t much of a senator? How did he even reach the senate?

      therefore i think being an elite as the main basis for any government position is a mediocre mentality itself. for being a public servant seemed requiring more on having a true patriotism and true leadership as an effective tool than just being sharp in all areas of theoretical applications.

      Duh?

  17. the only way for preventing incompetent individuals from entering public offices is for intelligent individuals to use that intellect to gain back the people’s trust in those talents by giving them the kind of life they need in this country.

    if there is such individual in this country, that is the only time i would consider such a person an elite than just by having a suma cum laude around.

    1. “the only way for preventing incompetent individuals from entering public offices is for intelligent individuals to use that intellect to gain back the people’s trust in those talents by giving them the kind of life they need in this country.”

      There were Gibo and Gordon who ran for presidential election together with Penoy. I consider those former two as intelligent individuals.

      And who the Filipino voters have elected?

      Don’t tell me Penoy is an intelligent person.

      If we’re talking about electing public officials in our country, it’s more on the name recall that counts than intelligence.

      There was a time in our country when those who don’t know who they will vote will consult the village elders, teachers, and other people whom they know can give them a good advice.

      Erap polarized the voters. It’s the poor against the elites.

      I consider the elites know why they are voting in an election and why they will vote for a candidate.

      Unfortunately, I can’t say the same for the poor. If not for being paid to vote for a candidate, emotion would be the other factor.

      Now, the poor is the one who is deciding the fate of our country.

      My 2 cents.

  18. It was a jolly good show I’d admit, Sen. Lapid got away with murder with his sob story, in any event, he garnered plaudits from fawning Pinoys and got a special mention from the presiding judge himself no less; nonetheless, lost along the way, perhaps conveniently forgotten, was the money laundering case of his wife in the US and his joining the ranks of ABS-CBN’s pool of talents in the course of the impeachment trial. A lot of people failed to grasp the significance of these events particularly the fact that the offer of ABS-CBN came on the heels of the incident in the US; that these details will not make it even as a footnote in our history makes it even more lamentable.

    1. My sentiments exactly! I hate the fact that Lapid, with the help of the Aquino minions managed to distract the rest of the public from his own indiscretions. It seems even worse than the perceived “error” in Corona’s SALN.

  19. Lito Lapid the high school kid never voted on principle, evidence or reasoning. It was never about conscience. It was always about the straight and wide path of political expediency and political opportunism.

    That the senatorial elections are coming is not just a coincidence. A man who sold his soul to the devil follows only a crooked path, never reason, rules or conscience. It is the greatest act of his life. Most of his acting is directed towards deceiving and using the poor, ignorant and gullible at the expense of the elite.

    The poor have always been used by politicians and other ruthless sectors in society. While the holier than thou personalities try to put the elite into a bad light. All this, despite the fact that they got to this status by way of hard, brainy and honest work. The communists have been trying hard to use the class struggle divide and conquer strategy. The dark politicians and their kind of people are doing the same.

    The poor and the elite will have to wake up from this continuing nightmare. They are being deliberately used and divided by ruthless men and women whose only object is political power and wealth. United we stand, divided we fall. Where are the political promises of reforms and economic progress that will benefit the poor and marginalized? What have the political slogans accomplished? Teach a man how to fish… Still no massive development/livelihood programs.

    SME’s are a start. Teach the poor commerce and trade. I say the poor and the elite should unite to move the country forward to development and progress. It begins and ends in the elections. Choose only the best, the brightest and those with virtue. Reject those who seek to divide the country. Reject the corrupt who pretend to be clean. Reject the opportunists and those who will do anything in the name of expediency.

  20. I think Filipinos like to be elite, but to be in it themselves, and with no particular merit. Because that’s what’s important for Pinoys: Distinction. Even if there isn’t anything to back it up.

  21. Good lord, Ilda, you make such a true point. A quick scan of Yahoo Philippines’ comments section reveals the delusional, ignorant and anti-intellectual mindset of the majority of “Da Pinoy” yellowtards.

  22. Choosing excellence over mediocrity is not rocket science. Everybody wants to do it. Everybody craves and wishes for it. But the question is, can everybody afford it?

    We all know that not every Filipino can afford a brain or heart surgeon? Not every Filipino can afford a top notch lawyer to defend him in court? Actually, very, very few Filipinos can avail of such services.

    In other words, the Filipino masses don’t have the luxury to choose what they think is the best. Decades ago up to Marcos time, more or less, people was entertaining the idea that they were choosing the best, the cream of the crop to lead the country to prosperity and development. But what happened?

    Remember the brilliance and outstanding credentials of past senators and congressmen elected in the legislature? The kampanilya quality of the justices we had in the Supreme Court? The excellent and impressive educational background and rich professional experiences of our past presidents? But where are we now?

    To say that, at present, there is an anti-elite mentality in our midst is just too late in the day. Too backward and too corny, in fact. We’ve had it all along. No need for a recognition on something that has been with us.

    1. @sanjo

      Choosing excellence over mediocrity is not rocket science. Everybody wants to do it.

      You sure about that? Why do Filipino voters choose someone like PNoy over someone with a better track record? Why do voters elect someone like Lito Lapid as a Senator? Sure, not everyone can afford the best doctor or lawyer but voting is free. The people can afford to vote someone better to run the country.

      Decades ago up to Marcos time, more or less, people was entertaining the idea that they were choosing the best, the cream of the crop to lead the country to prosperity and development. But what happened?

      The people’s lack of attention to how public servants do their jobs is the reason why the country got mismanaged. In other words, people’s apathy and indifference to how the country is being run is the real cause of corruption.

      You should realise now that it is really the Filipino padrino system that sucks. While the incumbent President vilifies his enemies, he also protects his own allies. So whoever is in Malacanang gets his assed-kissed by the rest of the other branches of government. The solution is for the law to be applied equally.

      A lot of brilliant public servants throughout Philippine history got sidelined just because of stupidity. It happend to Former Vice President Laurel, Former General Angelo Reyes and etc. Just look at what happened to Corona. A brilliant lawyer with an impressive track record in both private and public sectors. Despite that, he got vilified and persecuted because he was perceived to be an ally of the former president. It is a damn shame for the country to lose someone like him just because Senators like Lito Lapid do not have the capacity to analyse things properly. This will keep happening if people like you keep believing in propaganda.

      1. Ilda – “You sure about that? Why do Filipino voters choose someone like PNoy over someone with a better track record? Why do voters elect someone like Lito Lapid as a Senator? Sure, not everyone can afford the best doctor or lawyer but voting is free. The people can afford to vote someone better to run the country.”

        *Better track record in elections is already passe. Ever heard of vote-buying? Election fraud? Ballot switching? Election heating? I mean, old fashion track record-based election is practically a thing of the past. While it is not completely erased in the voters mind it no longer holds true because of past experience Filipinos had with such kind of strategy. That is the reason why I asked in my other posts, where are we now?

        People vote for Lito Lapid because they grew tired of voting the Jose De Venecias. They have been cheated by the Ferdinand Marcoses. They felt neglected by the Fidel Ramoses. They were betrayed and abandoned by the Gloria Macapagal Arroyos.

        Why they vote for Lapid? Why, what is there to lose when you already lost everything voting for the elite, the educated and the rich?

        Ilda – “You should realise now that it is really the Filipino padrino system that sucks. While the incumbent President vilifies his enemies, he also protects his own allies. So whoever is in Malacanang gets his assed-kissed by the rest of the other branches of government. The solution is for the law to be applied equally.”

        *And who promoted, supported and continue to protect the padrino system in our country? Is it the poor? The weak?

        It is very convenient to blamedthe current administration for what ill the country especially if you dislike it personally. But I don’t think any rational and observant person will fall for it.

        The decay has long been happening even before Noynoy enrolled in elementary school for you to dump everything to him, in fairness.

        Yes, I agree with you that the law should be applied equally. And for starter, we just witnessed such theory in the just concluded impeachment trial of a chief justice.

        Please stop exaggerating. We did not lose Corona because of Lito Lapid. We lost him in spite of Lapid. We lost Corona because of his undoing. Right or wrong, he aligned himself with the most corrupt official in the country. There was no impression there. Everything is real. Corona is with the devil. Yes, we lost Angelo Reyes but we lost him because of his own undoing which a lot of people suspect was related to some chicanery he was involved in. Actually, the losing part was his decision. Even if he did not killed himself, he would be lose and buried eventually.

        No, it’s not about me believing in Lapid for I am not a believer. It’s about looking at the correct political landscape we’re in. It’s about accepting what reality is. It’a about not being in denial. It’s about being real as real as the title of this blog.

        So there.

        1. @sanjo

          Despite your long winded arguments, I’m sorry to say but you don’t really have much of a point. The fact remains: Filipino voters keep voting people like Lito Lapid. Whatever their reason, whether they got tired of people like De Venecia or they felt “betrayed”, voting a celebrity who doesn’t know how to do his job properly is still wrong. Not only are people like Lito Lapid a waste of space and tax payer’s money, they don’t do much to change the toxic environment in the government anyway. To assume that every educated person would turn out to be like De Venecia is narrow-minded and silly.

          No. The Filipino people lost a good person in Corona just because he was vilified and persecuted by PNoy and his minions. That’s not an exaggeration. This is evident in the fact that the people who work in the Supreme Court are now reported to have low morale because someone they hold in high esteem and respected was removed without due process.

        2. Ilda

          It’s pretty obvious that you are not interested on the reason why Filipino voters vote the way they do. All you want to say is they are wrong in doing so. Fine.

          It is unfortunate because you will continue to miss the point.

          You keep on pounding on LIto Lapid and people like him regarding waste of ‘space and taxpayer’s money’ while conveniently overlooking the fact that we experienced the same kind of waste on trapos and professional politicians. So what really is the difference? Again, I’m sure you’re not going to address that.

          I agree, the Filipino lost Corona but they did not lose a good person in him. But to be fair, his admission of the decision against him is good. Never mind the Supreme Court personnel suffering from low morale. It’s a wake up call to make them realize that padrino system is not a sure thing.

        3. @sanjo

          I have already pointed out why Filipinos vote the way they do. You just need to either take it or leave it.

          You keep on pounding on LIto Lapid and people like him regarding waste of ‘space and taxpayer’s money’ while conveniently overlooking the fact that we experienced the same kind of waste on trapos and professional politicians. So what really is the difference? Again, I’m sure you’re not going to address that.

          Another pointless statement. Did I actually say that people should vote for trapos? Get real!

        4. Ilda – Another pointless statement. Did I actually say that people should vote for trapos? Get real!

          Nope. Nothing in my post even suggest that.

        5. In a way, maybe Sanjo is right. People vote the way they do because they are looking for anyone, just anyone who they feel may not “wrong” them as opposed to the traditional politicians people vote into office. It’s the same situation everywhere. But Ilda is also right. People should realize they have the power to vote someone who is intelligent into office. There are so many intelligent people, waiting for their time to shine, but are not given to because people try to chooose the easy way out, probably because they have suffered for so long. So yes, people like Lito Lapid are a waste of taxpayer’s money, but people have not yet realized their power to vote in people who can make a difference.

        6. To Critical Thinkier:

          Perhaps. I like to think that the people vote for the ones who they are “familiar” with, not just because of the “promises for the people and all that jazz”, but also because the people fear that the smart ones know how the system works and would actively try to bend the rules to his/her benefit and screw over the people.

          I guess that’s why they vote for celebrities like Lito Lapid, because the people know them as either the good guys who they could rely on to save them from trouble, or because they feel like the celebrities in question are rather nice to hang around with, or something. Whereas other people like Gibo and Dick Gordon tend to be ignored because they’re either unknown to the people, or because they’re so smart that the people fear that they may use the system to benefit themselves.

          Of course, that’s just a theory.

        7. Let’s analyze the situation clearly. (1) We shouldn’t vote for incompetent candidates. (2) But the people are looking for those that they think that would represent them, and they find it in those “actors”, “athlete’s”, “celebrity”, etc. type of candidates. (3) Did it solve the problem? No. (4)Thus everyone has the potential to be corrupt, no matter whether he/she is well-educated or not.(4) Therefore if you were to choose, who would you vote? (a) A corrupt and incompetent leader, or (b) A corrupt but competent leader?

          If I were to choose I’d rather choose the competent one. At least are country has a better chance to improve than choosing those who are not fit for the position.

          How about you. Who would you choose?

        8. What the author wants to point out is that the likes of Lapid, Pacquiao, Erap, Poe (may his soul rest in peace), etc. is not the solution to the problem.

    2. @sanjo
      “Choosing excellence over mediocrity is not rocket science. Everybody wants to do it. Everybody craves and wishes for it. But the question is, can everybody afford it?”

      I would like to comment on this statement of yours because I feel you have failed to grasp something.

      You pounced on the idea of affordability which I found odd. I’ll set a scenario.

      Assuming you can only afford to pay 300php for a doctor’s visit. Is there only 1 doctor with a 300php consultation fee? Sure the “best” doctors might be charging 1,000 to 1,500 php per consultation, but in the range at which you can afford, there is still a better doctor and a not as good doctor.

      Another example. The cars we can buy. You may view a 1m php car as an great car but you can only afford a 500k php car. In the 500k php range, you still have a choice do you not? Some are better on certain points, while some fall flat. But because you know what you want/need, then you will opt for the best “bang-for-the-buck” choice you can get yourself.

      This can be applied to voting. However, in the case of voting, you are always able to pick the best choice you can think of if you really think about choosing for the excellent candidate. The only problem is, some choose simply to follow the “popularity contest” without giving due consideration to platform, track record and the like.

      So can you vote for the best among the candidates? I don’t see why not. Can’t you?

      1. You focused too much on the word ‘afford’ when I used it instead of saying not all can avail of excellence. My bad, perhaps.

        On the other hand, you analogy on voting is a bit of, I think. I agree, you can always pick the best or excellent candidate to vote for. However, it doesn’t necessarily follow that your pick is going to win.

        Again, we have to remember that elections are popularity contests, basically. So, if other people opt to pick candidates of whom they recognize or known to them personally or otherwise, that’s their choice.

        1. Ilda’s point is just simple: voters are very stupid because of what the biased media tells them, especially on the Marcoses and even the Arroyos. Her point is that most Filipinos are anti-intellectual.

          One thing is for sure: we can never move forward as a country if we rely on apelyidos, athletes and artistas always matter.

          You’re missing the point, TROLL.

        2. “Again, we have to remember that elections are popularity contests, basically. So, if other people opt to pick candidates of whom they recognize or known to them personally or otherwise, that’s their choice.”

          Actually, that’s the problem with our current state. At least acknowledge that elections are popularity contests.

          The popular choice is not always equal to best choice. The best choice is always relative. It depends on who is looking. Sa taong mamamatay sa gutom, kahit anong ipakain mo “the best” na. Ang busog mamimili pa.

        3. I agree, you can always pick the best or excellent candidate to vote for. However, it doesn’t necessarily follow that your pick is going to win.

          Another flawed logic that Filipinos use over and over but expect a different result every time. They only elect someone because he will win not because he is qualified.

        4. Ilda,

          That one I really can agree without any violent reaction.

          “Another flawed logic that Filipinos use over and over but expect a different result every time. They only elect someone because he will win not because he is qualified.”

        5. Ilda – “Another flawed logic that Filipinos use over and over but expect a different result every time. They only elect someone because he will win not because he is qualified.”

          The paragraph above is out of context on what was being talked about which is, not anybody can avail of what one wants.

          I suggest you go back on what 17Sphynx17 said in his post to get a traction of what we’re talking about.

        6. Sanjo, elections do not have to be popularity contests. In many mature democracies around the world, people vote in people who may not be popular, but those they vote in will get the job done. Right now, it’s a popularity contest in the Philippines because society is not mature enough to select able candidates as opposed to popular ones.

        7. “I agree, you can always pick the best or excellent candidate to vote for. However, it doesn’t necessarily follow that your pick is going to win. Again, we have to remember that elections are popularity contests, basically. So, if other people opt to pick candidates of whom they recognize or known to them personally or otherwise, that’s their choice.”

          In short:

          “Ah dun ako sa alam kong mananalo…” loooool XD

  23. Again, I have to give credit to Sen Lapid.

    If intentional, he’s quite the political strategist.
    If unintentional, he’s lucky, maybe lucky enough to, god forbid, run for higher office.

  24. The neutralizer for the intellectually elite is doing your best in your chosen profession. Be the best carpenter, the best driver, the best teacher or the best lawyer and doctor but please we should also elect the best qualified person in the senate and executive branch of government. Not those same names we keep on electing and those pa pogi and padrama over the hill actors and actresses.

  25. “It should follow that if I ever have to vote for a president of my country…well, I will never vote for someone as mediocre as President Noynoy Aquino. Life is too short to put my trust in people like him who waste people’s time learning on the job while millions go to bed hungry every night.”

    SO TRUE.

  26. 1. The word elite is encompassing. In politics, when you hear elite, it normally means a top percentage of the population, based on income/net worth. Should you talk sports, or most any other realm, elite would mean the top of the class in terms of skill. There is however a difference, and you need to be careful addressing this difference. In your article you should not switch from one definition to the other.

    If you say Filipinos have an anti-elite mentality and then redefine elite as a smaller section of what the word usually means in this context, it is confusing to the reader. It’s like saying “muslims are violent” in your headline, and then defining muslims later on as “only the fanatical jihad supporters.”

    2. Filipinos, namely the masses, are anti-elite when “elite” is defined the way it is in politics– top earners/greatest net worth. Why? Because the poor get poorer and the rich get richer, simple as that.

    3. In Lito Lapid’s case, technically and even in your definition, he is part of the elite. Legendary movie star turned politician. He may not be an elite politician, but he is an elite movie star and he is using his elite movie star skills to win over the masses. I too am disappointed in whoever applauds his speech, but doesn’t that just go to show the masses do not hate elites, but they do hate those whom they feel have exploited them. While those who hide it well are spared. Now, do not blame the masses for their perception because that is a whole new can of worms.

    4. I dare you to verify your article, by going around town and asking people the same things you ask yourself. Ask them if they would want to have the best doctors the best lawyers, the best politicians work for them, and i bet their answer would be a resounding yes. I highly doubt that they would be anti-elitist in your article’s definition of the word.

    5. We have a lot of problems, but being anti-elite in its political definition, or at least in my common understanding, is not one of them. The elite or 10% who own 90% of the country, have a history for exploiting the masses. This does not only go for our country, but also highly civilized and advanced countries like the US and countries in the EU. Do you still seriously question why we’re anti-elite?

    6. Let me ask you a question, what if your elite… your doctor, politician, navy seal, etc. didn’t pay any attention to you cause you had absolutely no money, no name, and no influence. They let your child die in a shitty hospital because they were all saving the daughter of a senator in a posh ultra-expensive hospital? Would you keep rooting for the “elites?” or settle for those who may not be the most technically gifted but look beyond money/influence/race/gender, in whatever field of service they are in. The majority of Filipinos have to be content because the “elites” use up all the resources.

    It feels as though you’ve never been in real poverty, in the city or out in the country. You’ve never been refused service by a hospital or lawyer cause you had no money. You’ve never been used as fodder by the military in firefights out in remote areas of the philippines. and you’ve never had to think of how you’re going to get the 50 bucks you need to feed your family some almost expired rice tomorrow. In short, you’re part of the Philippine elite.

    Take your own advice. Be the elite that you define. But do not forget that integrity, compassion and responsibility, are as crucial as technical skill when it comes to being the “best.”

    Anti-elite mentality is not tantamount to a love for mediocrity. Please do not simplify it to such.

    PS. Part of the so called elite myself. Only i’m honest enough to admit that i’m as big if not a bigger part of a problem instead of pointing to the “masses” and blaming them for the things the elite have put them through all these years.

    1. @LegalizeIT

      You are making it sound so complicated. It’s not. First, the article did not specify that only the “masa” are anti-elite. Heck, even some members of the so-called Philippine “elite” are anti-elite based on the definition given above. You can’t say that PNoy underwent a rigorous study of, or great accomplishment within, a particular field; or has a long track record of competence in a demanding field; an extensive history of dedication and effort in service to a specific discipline or a high degree of accomplishment, training or wisdom within a given field. So therefore, Filipinos from the middle and upper class who supported his candidacy are also anti-elite.

      You may consider Lito Lapid an “elite” actor but he is not an “elite” legislator. Meaning, he is not competent in his current chosen field. So therefore, those who voted for him as a Senator are anti-elite. They could have chosen someone with a long track record of competence but they didn’t.

      No doubt there would be people like me who would want to hire the best lawyers or doctors but the fact remains, we have less of them, which makes them unaffordable to the regular Juan because excellence is not celebrated in our society. A lot of Filipinos would rather pursue a career in show business instead of pursuing a career in medicine or law. That is the point.

      Some of the so-called “elite” members of our society unfortunately became part of the group that has to govern the laws of the land only because the voters put them there. They are not genuine elites. They just accumulated wealth and influence through the help of the people themselves.

      If you are poor, the only way you can change the environment is by using your vote wisely. If you use your vote wisely and choose the right person as your public servant, he may help level the playing field in our society and provide you with more access to better and affordable health care and the legal system.

      You should stop thinking that this article is only referring to the “masa”. I’m talking about Filipinos in general and this includes members of the middle and upper class. Some of them also vote for public servants who have not shown extensive history of dedication or high degree of accomplishment in their chosen profession.

    2. good point @LegalizeIT you have destroyed Ilda’s point of view that Filinos cannot progress because of an anti-elite mentality, i idolized Ilda for her critical mind in her past and previous columns, but this one i totally disagreed, i am in my belief that the elite or the rich people in our society continues to get rich and the poor gets poorer, our our govt failed to bridge the gap between the rich and the poor and that our society has became victims of inequality and injustices, you cant blame Filipinos to hate the elite becoz it is only them that enjoys the countries wealth…

      1. @mamang sorbetero

        i am in my belief that the elite or the rich people in our society continues to get rich and the poor gets poorer, our our govt failed to bridge the gap between the rich and the poor and that our society has became victims of inequality and injustices, you cant blame Filipinos to hate the elite becoz it is only them that enjoys the countries wealth…

        What a ridiculous statement. You are stuck with the idea that the term “elite” only refers to the “rich”. Your argument is flawed. A lot of the members of the elite accumulated their wealth through legal means. Most professionals get paid well because of their unmatched expertise. You need to stop that victim mentality and start working smarter or harder.

      2. Maski ang isang mamang sorbetero, magtataho, or magbabalut, pede rin maging elite. “Elite” in a sense na maiangat ang kabuhayan nila. And that is through hard work. Yan ang narating ng mga elite businessmen dahil nagsumikap sila gamit sariling sikap at tyaga. Kaya’t wag kang bitter sa mga angat sayo. Get better!

  27. Ilda,

    I’ve been doing research on the elite behavior in the Philippines. My little comment is that you have to be very careful when you define the elite. LegalizeIT was correct to point out that the term elite is a political concept, denoting individuals and families who wield power in society. There are various forms of elite groups: economic elites have power over the country’s market transactions (think of the conglomerate-owning tycoons in the Philippines), political elites have power over the creation of policies (e.g., our politicians, including Lito Lapid), military elites have the power of applying force or violence (e.g., PNP, AFP, even private armies owned by local warlords), and social and cultural elites have the power to influence the country’s social norms (the Catholic Church and large religious denominations).

    Among economists and political scientists, there is agreement that there is always constant tension among the elites and the larger section of society who have little or no right on what policies should be made or how resources should be allocated (they are the “masses”). To say that the Filipino masses are anti-elite is far deeper than failing to appreciate talent. In a country where resources and political voice is only cloistered around a small set of elite groups, the masses have the incentive of going against the existing institutions that fosters elite rule.

    For an education of elite groups, please read Dante Simbulan’s book, The Modern Principalia: The Historical Evolution of the Philippine Ruling Oligarchy or you may read papers from John Sidel, Paul Hutchcroft, and Emmanuel de Dios.

    In fact, if you also read Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty by Daron Acemoglu of MIT and James Robinson from Harvard, being “anti-elite” is actually the reason why countries like the United States, Australia, France, and the United Kingdom prospered.

    The United Kingdom successfully created inclusive institutions by severely reducing the powers of the monarchy during the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. In this transition, the British Parliament, comprising a pluralistic spectrum of merchants, labor union advocates, and professionals, created the rule of law and secured property rights and provided incentives for creative destruction that led to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution.

    France completely eliminated its absolutist elites, beheading King Louis XVI and the lavish Austrian-Hungarian Queen Marie Antoinette. France established the National Assembly that ironed out a constitution that fostered equality, liberty and justice for all.

    The United States and Australia, former colonies of Britain, were successful in creating inclusive institutions because they never had absolutist-ruling elites in the first place. As countries of new settlers and ex-convicts, respectively, the institutions in the United States and Australia did not have an incentive to coerce its labor force by imposing excessive taxes or cheap labor; otherwise, their beginning societies would end up in chaos. Instead, they fostered institutions that brought about strong property rights, rule of law, and pluralistic representation among many sectors in the society. The foundations of which the US and Australia had led to strong institutions that became the platform for their economic growth and development.

    In Asia, Japan began to see development upon removing the shogunate ruled by the Tokugawa family. China only began to move forward upon the removal of the Emperor.

    As you will see, all these actors are elites. And the stories among these societies show that anti-elitism, in the political sense, brought about the proliferation of institutions. It provided opportunities for all, it secured that everyone has the right to vote, that everyone has the right to say their grievances, and that everyone is allowed to create and innovate their enterprises.

    I understand that you begin to define elites on the merits of professional quality. But really, this need not be called ‘elitism’ but professionalism.

    At the end of the day, what is really important is for our society to be pluralistic. The structure of Philippine government right now, although in paper advocates for a multi-party system, remains entangled with elites, their families and relatives, holding power and they have not necessarily provided the needed representation to the people they serve. The process of institutional change, and it has been happening in the Philippines with incremental steps of promoting transparency and accountability and the advocacy of eliminating corruption, will take one or two generations before its real effects will set in. And this prediction is based from many historical accounts from many countries around the world.

    What is important right now is that the Philippines is slowly changing to achieve more inclusive institutions. But what should be key goals that we should always take into consideration is the achievement of genuine democratic institutions and laws that protect the opportunities for people to create and innovate their enterprises.

    In our end in the academe, this is a continuing debate that has no concrete resolution yet but on our end, we are also doing our fair share of untangling the complexities and coming up with a concrete understanding of the country’s development path.

    1. I think it is still safe to say that many Filipinos do not like the idea of having an “elite” above them. They prefer to rule themselves, even if they do not know how to. It supports the idea that Filipinos mostly do not like to follow the rule of law.

      What they want is, when they suspect someone is doing wrong, shoot first. Then when they find the person is innocent, sorry nalang. In the end, Filipino calls for justice can be calls for injustice.

      1. True. There is a complete difference between rule by law and rule of law. The elites who wield political power depend on the law they crafted to enforce their own interests. That happens in many societies where elites abuse the government infrastructure. On the other hand, there is the rule of law, where the interests are pluralistic and our political institutions afford equal rights for all, both the rich and the poor. I do get the impression that rule of law in the Philippines is hit and miss because we tend to see, and this is quite a normal observation, that the country is run through rule by law, where whoever has the ball takes the power.

    2. @Miguel

      To say that the Filipino masses are anti-elite is far deeper than failing to appreciate talent.

      The article is not referring to the masses per se. The article is referring to Filipinos in general. As pointed out in my other comment, even some members of the so-called Philippine “elite” are anti-elite based on the definition given above. Meaning, they are anti-excellence. They are not in pursuit of excellence, kung baga.

      LegalizeIT was correct to point out that the term elite is a political concept, denoting individuals and families who wield power in society.

      That’s basically the same as what I wrote: “Being one of the elite members of society doesn’t necessarily mean membership in one of the wealthiest families in the country. Being a member of the elite means you are from “a select group of people with, intellect, wealth, specialized training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are those whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously or carry the most weight or those who view their own views as so; whose views and/or actions are most likely to be constructive to society as a whole; or whose extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom render them especially fit to govern”.

      Enumerating the various forms of elite groups is not really the point of the article but thank you for your input.

      I’m sorry but I was very clear on my intentions and definitions. You are talking about something different when mentioned the beheading of King Louis XVI. The term “elite” is not limited to the monarchy.

      I am talking about electing public servants who are skilled in their chosen field; the best of the best and not someone who is just a member of the privileged group. The two should not be confused as one and the same. The former group is good and beneficial to society while the latter just takes advantage of the underprivileged for their own benefit. They also enjoy a relatively large degree of control over a society’s means of production, and includes those who gain their position via means afforded by their social class and not as a result of personal achievement (read: the Philippine oligarchy).

      1. @Ilda

        Yes, I understand your point but I think the article poses an issue since there already has been an established issue of what elites are. And admittedly, as a academic conservative, I tend to be very specific on definitions. Your definition though, I truly respect it, and you are correct in pointing out that they are not one and the same sets of people. I would prefer to call them simply as anti-excellent rather than just calling them anti-elite, because, it would be less confusing.

        And of course, the elite definition is not limited to the monarchy. Anyone who wields power, economic, political, social, military, is an elite. But it’s nice try though you introduce a concept of “Enlightened” Elites if you put it in the perspective of excellence. Then, that would certainly be less confusing.

        As a whole, I do commend your article. You did attract people like me working in universities to join in the discussion. Hope to hear more from you.

        1. @Miguel

          I chose to use the word “elite” because I wanted to point out that the word actually means more than just simply being in possession of lots of money. In the Philippines, the meaning of the word has been misconstrued to mean simply as a group of people with money and not hardworking people who made money. Which is precisely the reason why some people have become anti-elite. I believe some people associate the word with people who simply want to accumulate wealth through robbing the poor.

          Yes, when you become influential, it is easier to accumulate wealth. But of course to become influential, you need to have done something significant. In the case of PNoy, he just happened to be the son of so-called “heroes”. Sadly, in our society, some public servants become so powerful because once in office, they use public funds to buy people off and hire their own private armies.

        2. @Yap and @ChinoF

          Resil Mojares of the University of San Carlos actually wrote about Filipino Intellectuals who were part of the Ilustrados. It’s “Brains of the Nation: Pedro Paterno, T. H. Pardo De Tavera, Isabelo De Los Reyes and the Production of Modern Knowledge.”

          Filipino intellectuals like Pedro Paterno, T.H. Pardo de Tavera and Isabelo de los Reyes were part of the ilustrado group, the Chinese-mestizo and Spanish-mestizo families that eventually emerged as today’s elite.

          Well, “dumbsia” elites do exist and I think Ilda’s article has more than enough stated the point that dumbsia elites in society. But for as long as they continue to represent the Jungian hero-archetype, they will still be very much around in society. We have to understand that the voting mindset is choosing the lesser evil but not the better man/woman.

          And I think there would be a huge difference in the kinds of candidates we elect if voting behavior eventually chooses the better candidate, not the lesser devil.

        3. Yes, the “lesser evil” argument has been overly played up. I think people are suckered into wrong thinking because of it.

        4. Full Definition of ELITE

          1
          a singular or plural in construction : the choice part : cream
          b singular or plural in construction : the best of a class
          c singular or plural in construction : the socially superior part of society
          d : a group of persons who by virtue of position or education exercise much power or influence
          e : a member of such an elite —usually used in plural

          That’s Webster’s definition. Nothing wrong with how the author used it. Let’s not get confused anymore.

    3. @Miguel

      I hope you can direct us where you have published your research. Baka mamya kwento lang yan.

      Ooops my bad, you’re not yet finished with it.

      Can I also say that I’m also been doing a research on why individuals have comprehension excellence even though they’re not grammatically adept.

      Once again, I’ve read a comment where it will make comment readers feel guilty because they have not read the books that the commenter have referred his argument. Or, in your case, you’re just flaunting that you’ve read those books and sorry for us. You might as well give us the link where we can read those books without buying them just to know what your thoughts are.

      How about telling us what your thoughts are without obliging us to read those books?

      You’ve commented:

      “Among economists and political scientists, there is agreement that there is always constant tension among the elites and the larger section of society who have little or no right on what policies should be made or how resources should be allocated (they are the “masses”).”

      And as I’ve commented earlier in this post, the masses are now the ones deciding the fate of our country.

      Most European countries are now about to fail economically and perhaps to happen also in US of A. That is contrary to what you’re claiming. They are not absolutist elite at this present time. If that happens, what now?

      Perhaps, one could better appreciate your comment if you’ve provided the timeline of the prosperity that you were citing which happened when absolutist elite were eliminated.

      For example France. As you’ve claimed France completely eliminated its absolutist elites, beheading King Louis XVI and the lavish Austrian-Hungarian Queen Marie Antoinette as their way to prospere.

      Maybe you’re correct or maybe not. But you may also consider prior to King Louis XVI, there is this Henry IV who was the first monarch of the Bourbon branch who was instrumental in improving France’s prosperity.

      For me, in a nutshell, it’s not absolutist elites (funny, I can’t find it in the web) but business privatization is the way to prosperity.

      Minimize government interference to free enterprise.

  28. I think the point of the article has been missed. The main message of Ilda for me is, Filipinos always want to blame the “elite” or some other group for their problems, instead of taking responsibility for themselves. That again is a general bad habit of Filipinos. For example, if they lost a gambling bet, they will blame GMA for it.

    1. @ChinoF

      Yes, some people have missed the point. They are crying foul again thinking that the article is being mean to the masses. If there is one thing the 2010 Presidential has proven, it is the claim that duds get voted into office because most voters are uneducated is not true. A lot of highly educated Filipinos voted for PNoy.

      1. @ChinoF and @Ilda,

        I think your points are quite valid. The comments on the masses and perhaps its misrepresentation to the spirit of the article may simply indicate that there is a confusion on the use of the term elite. From an academic point of view, there is already an established definition of the “elite”, synonymous to that of the oligarch (Hutchcroft, 1998), the ‘boss’ (Sidel, 1999), the warlord (McCoy, 1994), or the patron (Lande, 1965). Those are terms we associate the elite in the negative light. I would definitely recommend reading Simbulan (2005) on the historical definition of the elite.

        And take note these academics are not taken by Filipinos alone but by Western scholars. In fact, Western scholarship introduced that concept to us. Hence, I do wish you take my concepts based on an academic technicality, and this may precisely be the reason why there is so much confusion found in the comments.

        However, as what I’ve presented to you, there are so called “enlightened” elites that led to the proliferation of institutions. And these are the “elites” that you are trying to point out, the qualified, the professionals, the labor union advocates, those who represent a plurality of issues in government. In Britain, these became the members of a strong Parliament. In the United States, they were the Framers of the Constitution. In France, they were the Generals and rebels who worked side-by-side (but not necessarily working together) to ouster the existing monarchy. In Singapore, they are the influential members of the People’s Action Party (Lee Kwan Yew being their patron). In Japan, they now constitute the Diet.

        If you may, Filipino voting behavior tends to favor the underdog and Filipino psychologists have provided evidence that there is this tendency (although there is no established theory yet as to why, maybe because of our colonial experience perhaps? Maybe because we tend to be submissive because of our trading origins? There is no concrete answer yet on our end). But there is that tendency why we vote for an Aquino, a Lapid, an Estrada, or a Poe.

        In a society where the voting mindset is voting for the lesser evil and not the greater good, these decisions usually arise and there is a behavioral explanation as to why this happens. But I guess that would be worth another posting.

        1. Good points there. I would agree the Philippines have the wrong “elite” up there right now.

        2. Miguel,

          Lovely replies and comments you have there.

          Filipino voting behavior does not always favor the underdog.

          I think Pinoys put more value on perceived trustworthiness over perceived competence. At least that’s how I see it. Otherwise, candidates won’t be marketed in the current style we’re witnessing.

          I think there is also a gap in voter education. Has there been a study on what voters think are the roles, duties and responsibilities of the positions they are filling whenever there is an election?

          I’m thinking that the utility and incentive for voting is not the same for all people.

          I suspect that the current setup of national elections is also to blame for the outcome — too many names to think of.

        3. nice @miguel, “elite” clearly defined, the title of the article “Filipinos cannot progress because of anti-elite mentality” misleads but succeeded in catching an issue, yes it creates confusion on the word “elite”, i agree however on one point that Filipino’s really made a mistake with their preference in choosing their leaders…

        4. “I think Pinoys put more value on perceived trustworthiness over perceived competence. At least that’s how I see it. Otherwise, candidates won’t be marketed in the current style we’re witnessing.”

          And only after they end up on the receiving end of a collective butt-rape do they realize, if they realize, their mistake.

        5. @Miguel

          This article has been read thousands of times according to the site stats and I can count only less than five people who got confused with my use of the word “elite”. They seem confused because they are stuck with the notion that the term “elite” refers to just the monied crowd and not those who possess the intellect and expertise in their chosen field. Furthermore, the term “enlightened” will not be appropriate in describing the elite squad for example.

          I think most people did not have a problem understanding the point of the article. I am not worried about my use of the term elite.

          One of the reasons why people like the Aquinos keep getting voted into office despite their incompetence is because most voters do not look for substance in their candidates.

  29. Despite what has been said about the deteriorating state of education in this country, enlightened minds are still rising up. They are comparable to the Biblical prophets of old. They shake up the old order from its complacency. What they proclaim is not palatable to the general public. Hence, they are vilified. In the case of the Kingdom of Judah, it took the Babylonian Exile for the people to grasp what the prophets were telling them from the start. It was through the exile that the prophets were finally given their due. In this country, it seems that we have yet to experience a catastrophe in the magnitude of the Babylonian Exile.

    If we already did, apparently the lesson was not learned. After being liberated from a dictatorship, we effectively returned to the pre-1972 social structure. Though we had a free society before 1972, it was far from ideal. You had private armies in the fiefdoms of the provincial privileged class. Guns, goons, and gold was the way to stay in power. Obviously, these are still around. Effectively, we still have a feudal system masquerading as a democracy.

  30. Seems like a lot a people had to much soap operas. Pft. A victim card-wielding, whoop-arse fodder poor chap protagonist vs the filthy rich, evil, scheming crab of an antagonist.

  31. Going back to the article, I am confused as to why the writer segued to this “anti-elite mentality” rhetoric when there was no direct basis for such in Lapid’s speech. The writer has all the right to voice her opinion about Lapid and his short speech, but to conclude that most Filipinos are anti-elite because you were irritated by some praises for Lapid’s speech, among all your other beliefs, is baseless.

    Then it became evident that the writer is quite smitten with the “elite” word. She goes on to define the elite as

    “Being one of the elite members of society doesn’t necessarily mean membership in one of the wealthiest families in the country. Being a member of the elite means you are from “a select group of people with, intellect, wealth, specialized training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are those whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously or carry the most weight or those who view their own views as so; whose views and/or actions are most likely to be constructive to society as a whole; or whose extraordinary skills, abilities or wisdom render them especially fit to govern”.

    A member of the elite is from a select group of people with wealth? Let’s remember that in our society, we cannot simply narrow down the definition of “elite” based on just political or economic parameters. There is a cultural reality that says “elite” individuals discriminate against the poor, or they discriminate against anyone who has less in skills or intellect or material things, or they simply just want to feel superior to others. And all these are regardless of wealth or power. Kahit saan makakakita ka ng “elitista”.

    “…those who view their own views as so…? Having confidence in yourself is fine, but this borders on arrogance and superiority complex.

    Many people would want to have a good level of intellect, experience, skills, training, and wisdom, but not necessarily be called “elite”. In fact, it would be great to have the word “elite” and all its negative connotations erased from our vocabulary and consciousness, but unless this happens, the writer is treading precariously on the “elite” concept, trying to justify her own definitions and perceptions.

    Given the writer’s seeming obsession with the “elite” concept, is the writer “elitista”?

    1. The writer is against him anyway even though he was voted by the Filipino. She is against democracy of the Philippines.

      1. Yes, Fishball. Lito Lapid was voted by the Filipino people. Which is why you should believe me when I say that they are anti-elite.

      2. Yes Fishball . You are anti intellectual since Kuya Noy is anything but an intellectual . Unless of course you listen to Grace Lee.

      3. Nah, Ilda is against a democracy which is run by IDIOTS like you and treat it as a spectator sport.

        She is against IDIOCRACY.

    2. Depends on what you mean by “elite.” Seems there are many different meanings, which can be equally valid. But those who can properly read between the lines will know what Ilda is actually talking about.

      1. The article is simple enough to understand that you don’t even need to read between the lines. But yeah, those who can’t read between the lines tend to miss the point.

    3. @Kapitan

      I suggest that you read the article again because you seem to have missed the whole point.

      I don’t know why you are saying that my claim is baseless. It is evident in the way the majority vote people who do not have the intellect, training and expertise for the job. Most Filipinos are anti-elite because they vote celebrities into public office, giving them power to manage state affairs even though they are incompetent. That is not an exaggeration.

      Then it became evident that the writer is quite smitten with the “elite” word.

      Like I said, you missed some parts of the article like this one:

      “If someone considered me snobbish and elitist for choosing excellence over mediocrity, I would definitely take it as a compliment because my definition of an elite person is someone who is the best of the best and not someone who is just a member of the privileged group. The two should not be confused as one and the same. The former group is good and beneficial to society while the latter just takes advantage of the underprivileged for their own benefit. They also enjoy a relatively large degree of control over a society’s means of production, and includes those who gain their position via means afforded by their social class and not as a result of personal achievement (read: the Philippine oligarchy).”

      Happy reading!

  32. Ilda

    The link below is the Official Gazette “Speeches of the Senator-Judges explaining their verdict on Chief Justice Renato Corona.”

    http://www.gov.ph/speeches-of-the-senator-judges-explaining-their-verdict-on-chief-justice-renato-corona/

    If you read the speeches delivered by the 20 who voted “GUILTY,” including Senator Lapid’s, you will readily notice that ALL Senators employed the same reason to justify their vote of conviction, which Senator Enrile summarized in the concluding line of his own speech:

    “I vote to hold the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Renato C. Corona, guilty as charged under Article II, paragraph 2.3 and that his deliberate act of excluding substantial assets from his sworn Statement of Assets, Liabilities, and Net Worth constitutes in my humble view as a member of this Court, a culpable violation of the Constitution of the Republic of the Philippines.”
    http://www.gov.ph/2012/05/29/speech-of-senate-president-juan-ponce-enrile-explaining-his-verdict-on-chief-justice-renato-corona-may-29-2012/

    And here is Senator Lapid’s similar line:

    “Ngayon, naayon po, lalung-lalo na si Congressman Fariñas, iyon pong prinisenta (present) niya kahapon dito, para sa akin lang po ay malinaw na malinaw na si Chief Justice Corona ay lumabag sa batas. Siya mismo, inamin niya na may $2.4 million at P80 million na bank account. Iyon po siguro ay hindi na kasinungalingan iyon, iyon po ay totoo na.”
    http://www.gov.ph/2012/05/29/speech-of-senator-manue-lapid-explaining-his-verdict-on-chief-justice-renato-corona-may-29-2012/

    But what has been highlighted over and over is this part of his speech directed to “the masa”:

    “Bilang high school graduate po, sa ating mga kababayan, ano ang sasabihin ni Lito Lapid, na hindi marunong mag-English, na hindi maalam sa batas? Ano kaya ang magiging desisyon? Didesisyunan po ang kataas-taasang hukom ng isang high school graduate lamang na taga-probinsiya ng Pampanga.”

    So, I think the media-manipulated “reactions” to Lapid’s speech were merely hyped and magnified to accentuate further the spin that the Senate’s 20-3 GUILTY verdict against Corona is shared by ALL walks–from “the elite” to “the masa” Lapid says he represents.

    (I still maintain the view though that under CSC Rules, SALNs “not properly filed” are correctable and, once corrected, are non-sanctionable–“shall not be subject to any sanction”; so, how can such correctable error or omission be regarded as a “culpable violation of the Constitution”–an impeachable offense?)

    1. @Domingo

      Thanks for the links. It should come in handy one day.

      In retrospect, it seems the judges who voted guilty had an almost identical take on why they think he should be found “guilty”. It’s as if they were coached. This is evident in how they quoted the case of the court clerk from Davao and had the same incorrect interpretation of why she was removed from office. Most of them especially Lapid’s speech was an appeal to emotion and to get points from the masa.

      I agree that the perceived “error” in his SALN is definitely correctable. The fact that his bank accounts are all under his name proves that he had nothing to hide. He just didn’t feel the need to include it because 1) the foreign secrecy law 2) they are co-mingled funds.

    2. Yes, I noticed that the reasons cited by the Senator Judges are all so strangely similar. The red flag for me is how several of them cited the case of that clerk of court who was dismissed, supposedly for non-declaration of SALN. But it was later revealed that the employee was actually dismissed for being double-paid her salary, which was notably small. Why all the senators are similar in quoting this mistake makes be believe the senators were fed the same info from an outside source, and the impeachment trial’s verdict was cooked from the start.

  33. Lito Lapid who is just a highschool graduate but was able to convict Corona who is supposedly a learned man; earning several degrees from great schools such as Ateneo, UST and Harvard.

    Moral of the story: A criminal can’t hide behind his high falluting degrees. A criminal is a criminal, he will always be caught.

    1. Moral of the story: A criminal can’t hide behind his high falluting degrees. A criminal is a criminal, he will always be caught.

      What was Corona’s crime? Did every member of Congress file his/her SALN on time? Did they declare their dollar deposits in their SALN? Why was the Ambassador to Syria allowed to correct his SALN and keep his post?

    2. Philip II:

      You’re right, ALL criminals for that matter, like the Dollar-hiding wife of the Senator Lapid, Mrs. Marissa Tadeo Lapid.

      Perhaps, it may have been Senator Lapid himself who tipped Homeland Security of her wife’s “hiding” activities, since “Bulk cash smuggling is … punishable by a maximum of 10 years in prison, according to a source from Homeland Security.” (The longer she’s inside, the better for him?)
      http://globalnation.inquirer.net/32135/las-vegas-hearing-on-lapid-wife%E2%80%99s-case-postponed-again

  34. “REPRESENTATE NG MASA, HINDI MARUNONG MAG-INGLES AT NI WALANG ALAM SA BATAS” – SEN. LITO LAPID

    DUTY OF A SENATOR
    CONCURRENCE ON EVERY BILL IN ORDER TO BE PASSED FOR THE PRESIDENT’S SIGNATURE TO BECOME LAW.

    Sa tagal ba naman ni LL sa government kailangan pa niyang ipagmalaki na highskul graduate siya? hello, kung ako nasa position niya siguro nakapag aral na ako ng abogasya! in short, tamad na siyang mag-aral para umasenso ang utak niya and those person who praised him due of his moronic dialogues I pity them!

    1. Exactly! Seems to me Lito Lapid is happy to be a high-school graduate because it’s ok with Filipino voters that he is ignorant of the law.

      1. Shame on you Lapid to convict Corona! Who is a hampas-lupa like you to cast judgement on a great man like Corona? How can a man like you, who is bereft of intelligence, judge a man like Corona who is represents what is good in this country?

        Never mind the other 19 senators/judges who also voted guilty. Unlike Lapid’s vote, theirs is backed-up by sagacity, wisdom and intelligence, nothwistanding the fact that they belonged to the elites. Lapid’s verdict is the most damaging of all because he represents the masa, the unintelligent one in our society. He has no right to be there much less give a judgement to our beloved CJ, period.

        We wish you death Lapid for parading and demonstrating before the eyes of the Filipino people how happy and lucky you are for being chosen as judge to hand a guilty verdict to Chief Justice Renato Corona, a man who is a bastion of purity, intelligence and almost holiness.

        Then the curtain fell. Whew! Good thing it was just a dream! A bad dream.

    2. Kung ikaw ang nasa posisyon ni Lapid at mag-aaral ka ng abugasya, mapipintasan ka lamang. Senador ka na, magtrabaho ka na lang at kumuha ng tunay na mga abugado bilang empleyado mo. Mag-aaksaya ka lang ng oras at pera ng gobyerno. Hindi naman kailangang maging abugado para maging epektibong senador.

      1. Only people like you would find something wrong with improving one’s skill. Not doing anything to be a more effective legislator is more costly because you will have to hire other lawyers to do your job for you. That’s what you call wasting tax payer’s money.

        Sigh…some people do not know when to quit.

  35. sanJO or JOnas

    But the curtain has gone up again, and I see through the haze this writing on the wall of the Royal Palace:

    “Article VII, Section 4. The President … shall be elected … for a term of six years which shall begin at noon on the thirtieth day of June … and shall end at noon of the same date, six years thereafter.”

    So, even before the term begins, like it or not, the END is already fixed to occur on 30 June 2016.

    I also learned that it was already near the end of year 2016–and PNoy, after facing “trumped-up charges,” was hastily tried, unjustly convicted and harshly sentenced to life in Bilibid, like former executives Estrada and GMA as well but, unlike him, as luck would have it, were earlier pardoned.

    End of a reading in “A history of the Future.”

  36. Manong sorbetero,

    Well, I must tell you that my first impression with the title is that Ilda got it the other way around.

    We cant progress to prosperity because the elite is holding down the poor to succeed. For example: The six months labor contract, the pitiful minimum wages when their employers makes more that 50% net profits, the gap between the public and private schools and on and on. Its a wonderful life, you know.

  37. Filipinos commending Lito Lapid for his simplified and true judgment is not an anti-elite mentality as you, Ilda would like to stressed. I did not vote for Lito Lapid but I commended him than the proud and arrogant elitist, Miriam Santiago who thinks she is better than the rest of the Filipinos. She is a big disappointment.

    You generalized that public servants who lacks education are worthless! I commended also Manny Pacquiao because of his good heart, open mind and his contribution to this country. He is effective as a politician with the help of his elite advisers and staff. Just like he is effective as a boxer with the help of his elite coach and boxing staff.

    Your idea of Filipinos as anti-elite mentality is just flawed and shallow. Filipinos are not anti-elite, we are anti elitists who thinks they are great and think of the common people as worthless. Other than and above intelligence, a public servant must have a good moral character and has a love for his countrymen.

    Are you an elitist?

    “To generalize is to be an idiot” -William Blake

    1. @Edward

      I’m sorry that you think that way of Senator Miriam Santiago. Fortunately, there are Filipinos out there who think she did the country proud for upholding the law. You might want to read this: Ovation shocks Miriam Santiago out of her skin

      She wasn’t part of the show but her entrance brought the audience to its feet.

      Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago may have been vilified by some quarters for her vote to acquit former Chief Justice Renato Corona two weeks ago but she got a standing ovation from an audience of about 1,300 who watched the “World Stars of Ballet” at the Aliw Theater in Pasay City last week.

      Santiago, an avid fan of Liza Macuja-Elizalde, walked into the full-packed theater featuring the prima ballerina on June 9, a few minutes after the show started at 7:30 p.m. Upon seeing her, the audience stood and mobbed her for cell phone photos until the security personnel intervened and asked everyone to return to their seats.

      Santiago said she was “shocked right out of my skin” at the warm reception, thinking her popularity as a public official had dwindled because she did not find Corona guilty of betrayal of public trust and culpable violation of the Constitution at the end of the impeachment trial on May 29.

      She, along with Senators Joker Arroyo and Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, were the only dissenters as against 20 colleagues who voted for Corona’s conviction and removal from office.

      “I am usually applauded when I am guest speaker or when I am featured in a campaign rally. But this is the first time that I have been given an ovation when I was simply a member of the audience. It was a thrill,” Santiago said.

      A day before the ballet, the senator was mobbed by hundreds of people at a bazaar in Greenhills, San Juan, while at its fresh food section. She moved to the other side of the marketplace but she was again mobbed, delaying her shopping spree

      Santiago said that while she was used to public applause and photo sessions, she did not expect her popularity to reach this magnitude.
      Her continued high public acceptance, she said, is one of the best gifts ever.

      Unfortunately, the number of Filipinos who don’t use their head and laud Lapid instead of Miriam is greater than those who do use their head. Which is the reason why the country remains Asia’s laggard.

      Lapid and the other celebrities should stick to what they do best and leave congress to people who are experts in crafting and legislating laws.

      Imagine the amount of public money Filipinos can save if public servants like Lapid and Manny didn’t have to hire “experts” to do the job for them.

      1. If Lito Lapid or Manny Pacquiao hired experts to do the job for them like researchers and experts of the law, the money has to come from their pockets from their salary and not from the Filipino people or public money. Nobody is all knowing like the self proclaim know-it-all Miriam Santiago. Other Senators has their own staff also to do some research and law the experts. Every leader needs an advisers even the President. Miriam on the other hand said Corona’s case (of not declaring all his assets) is not of the same class example betrayal of public trust which is very wrong! 1,300 people in Aliw Theater does not speak of the whole Filipino nation who are disappointed of her. Her long not guilty speech is more of a self gratification and senseless comparing Corona’s (a public servant) case to a foreign investors. Lito Lapid is a classic example that it doesn’t have to be a lawyer to have prudence and know what are prohitions of the law (Don’t worry I still wont vote for him). Corona on the other hand, an elite and was the chief justice failed to abide the basic requirement of the law.

        You suggest that if there are two politicians run for office say Congress. One is an expert of law but morally he is a corrupt servant; and one is not an expert who is a college undergrad or a high school graduate but honest and reliable. Then we should vote for the former, an act that doesn’t make any sense at all.

        I did not vote for the late FPJ when he ran for President. But if I have to choose between him and GMA, I would certainly vote for FPJ! But certainly this action is not an anti-elite mentality as you fondly reiterate in your article. You are misleading!

        1. @Edward

          You suggest that if there are two politicians run for office say Congress. One is an expert of law but morally he is a corrupt servant; and one is not an expert who is a college undergrad or a high school graduate but honest and reliable. Then we should vote for the former, an act that doesn’t make any sense at all.

          Duh? When did I suggest that Filipinos vote for someone who is morally corrupt?

          When did investing your savings in foreign currency become a basis for someone who is “morally corrupt” in the first place? How did it become a betrayal of public trust? Did all of his accusers file their SALN on time? Did they declare all their savings including their foreign accounts in their SALN? How come the Ambassador to Syria was allowed to correct his SALN and keep his post at the same time? Are you applying double standard just because the media has convinced you that Corona is “morally corrupt”?

          If Lito Lapid or Manny Pacquiao hired experts to do the job for them like researchers and experts of the law, the money has to come from their pockets from their salary and not from the Filipino people or public money.

          And you know this because? Do you have proof of this?

          Every leader needs an advisers even the President

          That is totally different from hiring someone to actually do your job for you perhaps because you are only a “high-school graduate”.

          1,300 people in Aliw Theater does not speak of the whole Filipino nation who are disappointed of her.

          How do you know that the entire nation is disappointed at Miriam? She may not be everyone’s cup of tea but she based her judgement on the law and common sense. Some Senators who found Corona guilty committed worse crimes than what he was accused of: It’s not like Corona was found guilty of plunder like former President Joseph “Erap” Estrada, the father of Senator Jinggoy. Corona is not even a convicted mutineer like Senator Antonio Trillanes who won a Senate seat while he was in jail for the crime of rebellion. Corona wasn’t even a repeat offender like Senator Gringo Honasan who led a series of coup d’etat against former President Cory Aquino during her term and who managed to escape while incarcerated. Corona did not even fake his own assassination attempt the way Senator Enrile did in 1972. His act was said to have been used by then President Ferdinand Marcos to justify declaring Martial law. Senator Enrile was also a suspected co-conspirator in the election cheating done in the 1986 “snap elections”, which was said to have robbed then candidate, Cory of the election.

          I did not vote for the late FPJ when he ran for President. But if I have to choose between him and GMA, I would certainly vote for FPJ! But certainly this action is not an anti-elite mentality as you fondly reiterate in your article.

          Oh really? That is so anti-elite! Did you know that PNoy would rather have GMA than FPJ?Please read article here. Some excerpts:

          “Noynoy’s little-spoken but nonetheless criminal deeds against the people did not end with the 2001 EDSA coup. During the 2004 elections, Noynoy allowed, or perhaps helped facilitate the electoral cheating committed against Fernando Poe Jr. in the conspiracy to fraudulently declare Arroyo as the winner of the presidential race. Noynoy as Tarlac congressman did nothing as stalwarts of his Liberal Party and others railroaded the congressional canvassing by refusing to open the contested COCs (certificates of canvass). As Daily Tribune’s Ninez Cacho-Olivares notes, Noynoy Aquino “kept his mouth shut even in the face of massive electoral cheating,” thus effectively preventing the Filipino public from knowing the real 2004 President-elect.
          …
          The only time Filipinos got to know that Fernando Poe Jr. (FPJ) really won in the 2004 polls was when the Hello Garci wiretapped tapes came out, which primarily showed that Arroyo engaged in conversations with elections commissioner Virgilio Garcillano in connection with operations surrounding the May 11, 2004 polls. However, even when the Aquinos already learned about the tapes, Noynoy did not immediately withdraw support from the Illegitimate “President.” In fact, he even voted AGAINST the airing of the tapes during the fifth Congressional hearing on the “Hello Garci” issue on June 30, 2005, the first anniversary of the surreptitious wee-hour-of-the-morning congressional proclamation of Arroyo as “President-elect.”
          …
          Noynoy even praised Arroyo’s televised July 2, 2005 I am sorry” speech, claiming it’s a “good start” for the controversial administration. Cory, for her part, even warned against resorting to extra-constitutional means to remove Arroyo, even as they themselves had four years earlier ousted Estrada and installed the Illegitimate in her place.
          …
          The sequence of events that his defense implies also constitutes falsehood: Noynoy Aquino actually withdrew support for Gloria only in July 8, 2005–six days AFTER he voted against the airing of the Hello Garci tapes. (As to why the Aquinos ultimately dropped Arroyo, GMA-7′s Stephanie Dychiu seems to point to the not-exactly favorable report of Task Force Luisita that came out that same month).”

          Happy reading! 😉

        2. @Edward

          Haha, your post speaks of idiocy. It’s like saying that you chose Noynoy over Gordon and Gibo. I just want to tell you that being anti-elite can be considered as anti-intellectual.

          You are misleading since you are missing the point. 😛

      2. “Imagine the amount of public money Filipinos can save if public servants like Lapid and Manny didn’t have to hire “experts” to do the job for them.”

        But all senators or congressmen, for that matter, have budget for that. Even senators/congressmen lawyers hire lawyers and other experts for their staff.

        1. Imagine the amount of public money Filipinos can save if public servants didn’t have to hire so many “experts” to help them do the job for them.”

        2. “Do you know the meaning of plunder? How about mutiny? How about assassination attempt? They are worse crimes than what Corona was found guilty of but some of the people who committed them gave Corona a guilty verdict for the perceived “error” in his SALN. There must be something wrong with you if you can’t see the injustice in that.” – Ilda

          -Yes, ma’m, there is injustice in what Corona did and let me tell you why I said that.

          You talk of ‘crimes’ when you mention acts committed by Erap, Honasan, etc. You are right there, they really did and commit such acts and was eventually punished for it.

          But on Corona’s case, you seem to handle it with a kid’s glove. His ‘error’ or ‘non-disclosure’ of assets is, for you, not comparable with the crimes of those you mentioned.

          You seem to forget the fact that the person who committed an error is not an ordinary person. You satisfyingly ignored the truth that the person who did a ‘non-disclosure’ is not a regular employee of the gov’t. He is a Chief Justice, ma’m!

          And the amount involved on his ‘error’ runs in the millions. Not in hundred or thousands of pesos but millions. The item of the non-disclosure is not just a stall in a rundown market but pesos and dollars that can built hundreds of markets. And the person involved in not an ordinary gov’t. employee trying to earn a sideline as a vendor. The Chief Justice, ma’m, was found to be willingly and intentionally keeping his millions out of sight from the public.

          The person of the perpetrator should be the focus and not simply the act. Because Corona occupied one of the most important office in gov’t. which demands utmost trust and confidence. It is not only Corona who was put to trial but the Supreme Court Chief Justice of the Philippine.

          Downgrading his act, which you are doing now, will not save the tarnished image of HIS person and the offense and shame he brought on the office he occupies.

          That you can take to the bank.

        3. @sanjo

          He had valid reasons not to include it in his SALN. Renato Corona did not commit an impeachable offense when he did not disclose his dollar accounts in his statement of assets. The savings Corona did not disclose was not even proven to be ill-gotten. He just didn’t feel the need to declare it because of the 1) Foreign secrecy law and 2) Some of it were not his but from the proceeds of the sale of his wife’s family business.

          If he really wanted to hide it, the accounts would not have been under his name. He would have used a dummy account. That’s how other public servants do it as per Miriam Santiago.

          The non-disclosure of bank accounts does not amount to an impeachable offense. Official should not be removed from office for minor breach of law.

          As pointed out by the defense, incorrect filing of statement of assets, liabilities and net worth has corrective measures, or could only result to a penalty of a fine not exceeding P5,000 or imprisonment of not exceeding five years, but not removal from office through impeachment.

          You can’t even answer this:

          Did all of Corona’s accusers file their SALN on time? Did all of them include their foreign accounts in their SALN?

          How come the Ambassador to Syria was allowed to correct his SALN and keep his post at the same time? Are you applying double standard just because the media has convinced you that Corona is “morally corrupt”?

      3. “It’s not like Corona was found guilty of plunder like former President Joseph “Erap” Estrada, the father of Senator Jinggoy.”

        -Yes, but after his conviction, he is as guilty as Erap is now. In fact, both shares the same drama in life: They were both terminated from office.
        ———-
        “Corona is not even a convicted mutineer like Senator Antonio Trillanes who won a Senate seat while he was in jail for the crime of rebellion.”

        -Yes, but like Trillanes before, he is a convict now. Same fate but different outcome.
        ———-
        “Corona wasn’t even a repeat offender like Senator Gringo Honasan who led a series of coup d’etat against former President Cory Aquino during her term and who managed to escape while incarcerated.”

        -I agree. On the other hand, Corona could have been an escapee also like Honasan had Enrile not ordered the Senate security to lock all doors to prevent Corona from escaping after testifying in the impeachment trial. Again, same fate, different outcome. Honasan too fast and slippery. Corona to slow and calculating.
        ———-
        “Corona did not even fake his own assassination attempt the way Senator Enrile did in 1972.”

        -Correct! By the way, was Corona’s SALN not fake too for his failure to reflect his true assets?

        1. Missing the point again Mr sanjo.

          Yes, but after his conviction, he is as guilty as Erap is now. In fact, both shares the same drama in life: They were both terminated from office.

          Do you know the meaning of plunder? How about mutiny? How about assassination attempt? They are worse crimes than what Corona was found guilty of but some of the people who committed them gave Corona a guilty verdict for the perceived “error” in his SALN. There must be something wrong with you if you can’t see the injustice in that.

          The savings Corona did not disclose was not even proven to be ill-gotten. He just didn’t feel the need to declare it because of the 1) Foreign secrecy law and 2) Some of it were not his but from the proceeds of the sale of his wife’s family business.

          The non-disclosure of some of Corona’s assets is not even included in the list of impeachable offense. Look it up so you don’t remain ignorant. You can’t even answer this: How come the Ambassador to Syria was allowed to correct his SALN and keep his post at the same time? Are you applying double standard just because the media has convinced you that Corona is “morally corrupt”?

          The above rebuttal applies to the rest of your flawed arguments.

        2. @sanjo, edward and all the others who think that Mr Lito Lapid is not morally corrupt,

          Please be informed that Senator Lapid’s millions subject of Ombudsman probe. Read it and weep:

          The antigraft watchdog, mandated by law to conduct investigations motu propio or even in the absence of a formal complaint, started making quiet inquiries about the senator’s own assets and liabilities shortly after his wife Marissa was caught red-handed by US authorities with some $50,000 at the McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas on January 15.

          Two of Lapid’s closest business associates confirmed to News5 having received calls separately in February from an Ombudsman investigator inquiring about the senator’s wealth a week after Marissa’s arrest. One said the senator cajoled him to keep silent; the other said he would talk only if he were caught in the middle.

          Marissa is out on bond, but is still in the United States, staying in a family-owned house at No. 2055 Buffalo Drive in Las Vegas. The house has been placed under lien by a US court to ensure that she would appear in court if and when indicted for dollar smuggling.

          Lapid acquired the Buffalo Drive house and another Las Vegas house in Bugler Swan Way, with a combined cost for the two assets of over $1 million; and a P25-million duplex in Baguio City the past six years. All of these are not included in the senator’s statement of assets, liabilities and net worth (SALN) filed in April 2011, according to his close associates.

          The duplex had an initial selling price of P40 million.

      4. @sanjo, edward and all the others who think that Mr Lito Lapid is not morally corrupt,

        Please be informed that Senator Lapid’s millions subject of Ombudsman probe. Read it and weep: – Ilda

        -In fairness ma’m, you maybe right there. But until Lapid is tried and convicted like Corona I’m going to hold my piece on that.

        1. But since Lapid is Noynoy’s ally that wouldn’t happen. Corona’s impeachment is all the president’s doing. You get my drift.

        2. @sanjo

          How good of you to give Lito Lapid the benefit of the doubt while Corona was not even given the same before and during his trial.

          The reason there aren’t a lot of people who know about the investigation into Lapid’s millions is because most of the Aquino affiliated media networks do not even put the news in their front pages. While any news about Corona then was worthy of the front pages of major news network. And that’s even when the so-called “evidence” hasn’t been introduced in court. He was attacked front, back and center while Lito Lapid is being hailed as some sort of “hero” by people like you.

          No, sir. You are not qualified to talk about justice because you ignore a lot of the facts and you want to remain ignorant of other people’s indiscretions.

  38. Manong sorbetero,

    Well, I must tell you that my first impression with the title is that Ilda got it backwards.

    In my mind, we cant progress to prosperity because the elite is holding down the poor to succeed. For example: The six months labor contract, the pitiful minimum wages when their employers makes more that 50% net profits, the gap between the public and private schools and so on and on. Its a wonderful life, you know.

  39. This article echoed on the issues of what I have been saying in the past. Qualification of all high government officials must be demanded from the President, Senators, Congressman, Mayors, and Counselors. Conscience is good but it’s not enough to govern your constituents. It takes some kind of intelligence and wisdom to lead. There ought to be a law of preventing unqualified people to be a Senator or Congressman! A five years of college education and experienced must be a requirement. A two weeks crash course does not count neither a six month Certificate from Harvard University. It only shows that going for a certificate from Harvard is a desperate measure to include the name in their resume.

    When “Erap” won the presidency in 1992 after former President Ramos, I knew this will be the country’s downfall. The first thing that Erap did is removed former SBMA chairman Dick Gordon from office. How stupid is that?

    Besides the uneducated / unqualified Lito Lapid who is taking up space in the Senate as a legislator please include…

    •Bong Revilla Jr. (No education)
    •Bong Revilla Sr.
    •Alma Moreno —– running for Senator
    •Aga Mulach —- running for Congressman
    •Anabelle Rama—running for Congresswoman
    •Erap Estrada
    •Roderick Paulate
    •Richard Gomez – for Senator (lost)
    •Manny Pacquaio
    •Imelda Papin— for Senator (lost)
    •More and more

    The question remains, what do these people bring to the table? If the Filipino people kept on putting unqualified showbiz personalities in office, it will only spells disaster to the country as a whole.

    1. @JOn

      This article echoed on the issues of what I have been saying in the past. Qualification of all high government officials must be demanded from the President, Senators, Congressman, Mayors, and Counselors. Conscience is good but it’s not enough to govern your constituents. It takes some kind of intelligence and wisdom to lead. There ought to be a law of preventing unqualified people to be a Senator or Congressman!

      Too right. The Filipino people have already given these celebrities a chance. They have not proven themselves worthy of the role of “public servants”. It’s high time voters put more people with enough competence to bring the country from third world to first.

      When “Erap” won the presidency in 1992 after former President Ramos, I knew this will be the country’s downfall. The first thing that Erap did is removed former SBMA chairman Dick Gordon from office. How stupid is that?

      The first thing PNoy did after winning the election was to vilify GMA and Corona. That’s basically the only accomplishment he can be proud of.

  40. Ooooopsss!

    Too many “is”. The first one should be omitted.

    I agree though that Lapid and most of the other actors have no business in the Senate and Congress. I have yet to see one who is at par to the position.

  41. Ilda, before the discussion will go to nowhere. Lets go back to the issue: You claimed that Filipinos who commended Lito Lapid have anti-elite mentality. Really? Did you know that the Juan Ponce Enrile, an elite also commended his fellow senator Lito Lapid? Well JPE is also have an anti-elite mentality according to your own definition. This is not an issue whether a lowly educated Lito Lapid should be in the Senate or not. Your claimed that Filipinos commending the actor-senator have anti-elite mentality is absurd and funny. You are just too damn proud to admit you flaw.

    1. @Edward

      Ilda, before the discussion will go to nowhere. Lets go back to the issue

      You only say it is going nowhere because you could not respond to the other points I raised anymore.

      You claimed that Filipinos who commended Lito Lapid have anti-elite mentality. Really? Did you know that the Juan Ponce Enrile, an elite also commended his fellow senator Lito Lapid?

      My use of the term “anti-elite” is not just in reference to the poor or the “masa”. Anyone who favors mediocrity over excellence is anti-elite in my book. So yes, anyone who thinks that Lito Lapid’s speech was commendable is anti-elite and that includes JPE. That is because JPE was praising a half-assed reasoning. It wasn’t based on the law. You can’t just vote “guilty” based on your conscience. You also have to consider if the defendant was given due process or if the offense is impeachable. Considering Lapid is also facing an investigation into is own undeclared assets, he had a lot of nerve impeaching Corona for something that can be corrected, a measure provided by the SALN law.

  42. I could response but there is no need to for that dodges the issue you raised in the first place. What you failed to know is that during 2004 your favorite Gloria Arroyo encourage his fellow cabalen Lapid to run for senator under the administration coalition K4. Lapid accepted the offer and won the election landing in the eleventh position. Wow GMA have anti-elite mentality as well (lol).

    More than just conscience, Lito Lapid was listening to both sides and even from Corona’s testimony and the irregularities as presented to him by the prosecution panel. He judged fairly despite his personal relationship to Corona (“pasensya na po, awang-awa”).

    Therefore many elite people in this country commending Lapid’s fair judgement like JPE have anti-elite mentality as well. These are the elite people who have “anti-elite mentality” (lol).

    Its very clear that you are pro-Corona and GMA and your blog all sounded with the same taste of bitterness. If only Lapid voted “Not Guilty” as expected, then people like you will commend him but won’t having with your so called “anti-elite mentality” (lol).

    The only reason why I’m commenting here is because I read this article posted in FB and a lot of elite people are making fun of your so called “anti-elite mentality”. Thanks Ilda, I have fun as well.

    1. @Edward

      I could response but there is no need to for that dodges the issue you raised in the first place.

      What you meant to say was, you could not respond to the report that your idol Lapid is also the subject of an investigation due to his undeclared millions. So who’s morally corrupt now? And your other idol PNoy and his mother were actually instrumental in putting GMA in power in 2001 and in helping her retain her seat in 2004.

      He judged fairly despite his personal relationship to Corona (“pasensya na po, awang-awa”).

      What personal relationship? Are you talking about Corona swearing him in after he was re-elected? That’s not a relationship.

      Speaking of relationships, a lot of people noted that in the middle of the impeachment trial, Lapid signed up with media conglomerate ABS-CBN to do “an action-oriented teleserye“. Meaning, Lapid has a business relationship with the Aquino affiliated TV network. No wonder his “conscience” told him to cast a “guilty” vote.

      Therefore many elite people in this country commending Lapid’s fair judgement like JPE have anti-elite mentality as well. These are the elite people who have “anti-elite mentality” (lol).

      Your statement is true. To help you understand the concept better because I can tell you are very confused, let me use another term. Even some Filipinos from the so-called “elite” group are “pro-mediocrity”. Meaning, they value low quality over excellence.

      Go ahead and laugh. Laughing at a serious matter is actually what most Pinoys are good at. Which is why the country remains Asia’s laggard.

      Its very clear that you are pro-Corona and GMA and your blog all sounded with the same taste of bitterness. If only Lapid voted “Not Guilty” as expected, then people like you will commend him but won’t having with your so called “anti-elite mentality” (lol).

      That’s just another baseless allegation. Advocating for the rule of law and critical thinking is not equivalent to advocating for someone. Bitter? Why should I be? One good thing that will come out of Corona’s conviction is more and more people will finally see PNoy and the rest of his allies’ deception. You will realise in a few months or however long it takes for you to open your eyes to the truth, that PNoy just used the people to effect retribution against his perceived enemies.

      The only reason why I’m commenting here is because I read this article posted in FB and a lot of elite people are making fun of your so called “anti-elite mentality”.

      Ask me if I care about what they think. They can’t even write an article that people share on Facebook. I guess I get to have the last laugh. 😉

  43. I don’t think you get it right honey, GMA is an elite, would you say the Aquino’s have anti-elite mentality for supporting GMA then?

    On the other hand you berate people who commended or voted a non elite person in public office, didn’t your GMA put Lito Lapid to where he is now? then GMA qualifies to your “anti-elite mentality” standard. 🙂

    Peace, lets take this lightly as I am having fun 🙂 for the record Lapid is not my idol! 😉

    1. @Edward

      The reason why you keep getting it wrong is because you assume that I am pro-GMA. Get that idea out of your head and you will understand the point of the article.

      If what you are saying is true then yes, GMA was being anti-elite or anti-intellectual or pro-mediocrity at the time she supported Lapid’s candidacy.

      for the record Lapid is not my idol!

      Now you are distancing yourself from Lapid just because I have shown you a report exposing his hypocrisy for casting a guilty verdict.

      You commend Lapid for his speech and put Miriam down without knowing all the facts. Miriam was right about Corona’s accusers. Nagmamalinis silang lahat.

  44. Ilda

    Below is the link to the Official Gazette page which “contains links and documents pertinent to the impeachment trial of Chief Justice Renato C. Corona.”

    http://www.gov.ph/the-corona-impeachment-trial/

    At the bottom of the above page are links to the “Official Records” (or transcripts) of the impeachment trial from the opening session on January 15th to the closing on March 29th.

    Go to the link for the Session of Thursday, February 2nd:

    http://www.gov.ph/downloads/2012/02feb/20120202-Record-of-the-Senate.pdf

    Scroll down to page 14. At the bottom of the page is the remark of Mr. Cuevas: “I am referring to Rule 7, Your Honor, Public Disclosure.” (Note: This is the CSC Implementing Rules on SALN declarations I cited in an earlier remark)

    Continue to read the exchange between the prosecutors and the defence teams together with the Senator/Judges and Presiding Officer until you reach page 25 (Remarks of Senator Escudero).

    Particularly interesting is the exchange between Representative Barzaga (Prosecution) and the President Officer on pages 18 and 19 regarding whether errors and omissions in the SALN constitute an “impeachable offense.”

    “Presiding Officer: Is it a high crime?
    “Representative Braganza (Prosecution): No, Your Honor, It is not a high crime.”

    Take it from there!

    NOTE: Page 18 of the February 2nd session transcript mentions the case of Presidential Anti-Graft Commission v. Salvador A. Pleyto (2011), the decision of which is found in the url below:
    http://elibrary.judiciary.gov.ph/decisions.php?doctype=Decisions%20/%20Signed%20Resolutions&docid=1304555911872763570

    Anyway, I think wiki’s discussion on “Anti-intellectualism” and “The Power Elite” (Mills, 1956) would clear the matter up with several of the commenters here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-intellectualism
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Power_Elite

    1. @Domingo

      I remember that exchange and that’s when I mistakenly thought that Enrile was being rational. He seemed to have agreed that any error in the SALN is not considered high crime and not an impeachable offense.

      In his own speech at the end of the trial, he even acknowledged that the prosecution applied unscrupulous tactics just to pin Corona down. But alas, he still chose to cast a guilty verdict in the end perhaps because he was offended by what he thought was a walk-out the previous week. He did not even consider that Corona was under a lot of stress for being persecuted for months.

      Let me paste the information about anti-intellectualism for Edward and his gang. He can’t seem to get it:

      Anti-intellectualism is hostility towards and mistrust of intellect, intellectuals, and intellectual pursuits, usually expressed as the derision of education, philosophy, literature, art, and science, as impractical and contemptible. Alternatively, self-described intellectuals who are alleged to fail to adhere to rigorous standards of scholarship may be described as anti-intellectuals.

      In public discourse, anti-intellectuals usually perceive and publicly present themselves as champions of the common folk — populists against political elitism and academic elitism — proposing that the educated are a social class detached from the everyday concerns of the majority, and that they dominate political discourse and higher education.

      Because “anti-intellectual” can be pejorative, defining specific cases of anti-intellectualism can be troublesome; one can object to specific facets of intellectualism or the application thereof without being dismissive of intellectual pursuits in general. Moreover, allegations of anti-intellectualism can constitute an appeal to authority or an appeal to ridicule that attempts to discredit an opponent rather than specifically addressing his or her arguments.

      Anti-intellectualism perhaps saw its most extreme form during the 1970s in Cambodia under the rule of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, when people were killed for being academics or even for wearing eyeglasses in the Killing Fields.

  45. @sanjo

    Um, what made you say that the writer cannot take criticism or contrary views?

    Coming from a neutral corner here,I think the writer had been patiently addressing feedback. She had been firm on her stand.

    Let’s just say that no one has presented a compelling enough counter-argument for her to switch views. You should also respect that.

  46. Attention: sanjo or jonas or Avernger

    Changing your name will NOT make your comments any better than the last one. So quit posting comments that do not address the real issue or that hasn’t already been discused. You just sound like a broken record.

    Please note that any comments attacking the writers of GRP will be placed in the spam folder.

    My article is not an attack on you. You are simply taking it personally.

      1. Maybe sanjonas can make it interesting (for himself) by debating with himself from time to time. I know someone who used to do that in forums just to pass the time.

        1. I notice when you confront our trolls about multiple ids, questionable id names or family ties to the President they will continue trolling but pretend you never made the accusation.

        2. jonas,

          LOL. baiting ka pa.

          Anyway, you can choose not to read Ilda. You know that you’ve got to pack more than what you’re saying to turn a writer.

          Puppies are cute, btw.

      2. He is now playing the victim card. The fact that he was using multiple handles is proof that his intention was not honorable to begin with.

      1. Grabe talaga. Ang hina ng utak. Jonas/Sanjo has been warned so many times not to abuse his commenting privileges but he still keeps posting ad hominems. Tsk tsk.

  47. criticize lito lapid all you want but claiming to psychoanalyze the entire filipino people is just dumb.

    because filipinos voted for someone grp doesnt like we are suddenly anti-elite, anti-excellence, pro-mediocrity, ignorant etc….

    this blog is political and not really about positive social reforms

    1. Said the moronic flip who doesn’t look at the whole picture and just thinking the obvious because he is so narrow minded.

    2. Are you an idiot? Everything positive has been put out there but people do not want to listen. Therefore, GRP decided to shove the ugly truth, but the truth regardless, to people’s faces until they finally gain the wisdom to do something about the problems out there. And besides, how do you define political? Everything’s political, if you bother to go to school to know its definitions. Ugh, so frustrating…

      1. everything positive has been put out there? what has been put out where? hehhehehee a meaningless statement

        political means this blog is not neutral and supports partisan interests. understood? idiot.

        1. At maninwala ka lalo sa propoganda na kinakalat ng media at mga ibang tao na puro ‘Think Positive’ parati, kahit ano man kagaguhan ang mangyari ang magawa ng bansa natin? Hay nako. Kung ayaw mo matuto, eh di magsawa ka sa condition ng bansa natin.

          Also, stop with this conspiracy theory crap. Get my drift, idiot? 😛

        2. Okay. Define what is neutral then. If we look at it from a common sense, there’s just what works and what doesn’t work. And yes, solutions have been put up there by the group. Have you attempted to counter it, point by point? No. Have you countered the point that his speech is reflective of the mediocrity that the masses go for? No. The burden is on you because the group has explained its point. The ball’s in your court.

    3. @jaks

      Here’s more proof of anti-intellectual/anti-elite mentality:

      -Erap Presidency
      -FPJ almost winning the 2004 Presidential election
      -Erap almost winning the 2010 Presidential election again
      -PNoy Presidency and
      -all the other celebrities and incompetent members of Congress.

      1. ok but how to change this mentality? i will reread post if the answer is there and will comment again 🙂

        there is something to be said about llapid ascending to the senate despite being a highschool drop out. in the same way that we can appreciate bill gates for his achievements as a clollege dropout but we wouldnt really advice kids to
        drop from college and “chase their dreams”. these are rare people (with apologies to bgates as he is clearly on another level than lapid hehehehe)

        1. Because Bill Gates has knowledge in managing a great company like Microsoft. Steve Jobs is a college dropout yet he was a genius and being the man behind what Apple is today because of his strategies on innovation.

          Lapid? He was a high school dropout yet instead of doing something that is really helpful to develop his skills, he became an action star in action films. Those two people are very rare than Lapid because they changed the world while Lapid was stuck in a anti-intellectual mentality that is present on most Filipinos today. Mediocrity really kills.

          There’s your answer. 😀

        2. Yes, formal education is not the be all and end all. But the cases you mentioned, they kept learning, kept pushing the envelope and were not satisfied with the world around them. Put it this way, can you imagine Bill Gates or Steve Jobs claiming they represent the uneducated masses? And they are in the same level? And that they don’t comprehend the situation in front of them? It does not matter how educated or uneducated one is, they will have emotions. Even a baby has emotions. That is what Lapid resorted to.

        3. “there is something to be said about llapid ascending to the senate despite being a highschool drop out.”

          Kid, name recall ang tawag dun. He was also with a strong party at the time. Ganyan talaga ang buhay pulitika.

          Ever wonder why Ramon Revilla Sr. lost the first time he ran as Senator? He registered his REAL name with the COMELEC. Guess what people remembered to put on their ballots.

      2. nothing wrong with being elite. and nothing wrong with being poor either. just don’t mock those who are not in your “league”. it’s inhumane. being born rich doesn’t give anyone the right to insult/belittle those who are underpriviledged. please. it’s these little things (greed, indifference) that make the “elite” hated by those they look down upon.

        1. Which part of the article do you consider “mocking” those who are not in my league? What league am I anyway? Please be specific. 😉

    4. Well, you’re missing the point after all. Those who voted for Corona’s conviction does not care about everyone but themselves while the other 3 cared for what is right.

      We can never change if we still stuck on mediocre thinking, which you love to lift it up. 😛

      1. daidoboy if lito lapid somehow voted to acquit corona would you include him in your list of those who “cared for what is right”? quite possibly you would overlook his meager credentials and your 3 would become 4. care for whats right what does that even mean sheeeesh

        1. Well, since he said that he’s a high school graduate and he doesn’t even know about the law and due process, then he should’ve voted for abstain.

          THAT is also ‘doing what is right.’ Sheesh, you never get it, don’t you?

  48. Hey Jonas, I would say that this blog is just a home and you’re a visitor.

    Perhaps, the way it is with your last comment, if I’m the blog owner, I would say find somewhere else where you can mock a blog owner.

    As for me, a commenter here just like you, I would say you’re abusing your privilege as a visitor of this blog.

    I also would like to abuse my privilege to call a commenter like you as an idiot commenter.

    Get a life. Everything has been logically explained to you. All you have to do is tell the comment readers the items from the blogger that is confusing you.

    You’re very good in evading the issue.

    You’re the commenter whom I described as “parang bading”. A commenter who would play both ends of the issue as if he’s just a non- committal or just playing a devil’s advocate role.

    Pwe!

    1. Another incorrect assumption.This blog is no ones ‘home’,and me reading/commenting agreeing/disagreeing does not make me a ‘guest’.This blog is just a place for ideas to be presented and debated,no?
      The filipino is a strange being in that they think they know what is going on/being said or thought,or what a situation is all about,then make what they think are intelligent statements on same and proceed from that point when it is incorrect to start with.It makes for compounded stupidity and it is all around these islands on a constant basis.All one needs to do is listen/read.
      If one hears what is said,not what one wants to hear said,and sees a situation correctly and then comments,this country would be much better off.

      1. Yeah right, and resorting to feelings and emoness represents knowledge. Nice logic you got there.

        It’s also Jonas’ fault since he’s playing the victim card here. And victim mentality is bad for our country.

      2. @Benny

        So I can just comment here anything that I want? Without the blog owner’s intervention?

        So you’re telling us “If one hears what is said,not what one wants to hear said,and sees a situation correctly and then comments,this country would be much better off.”

        Are you sure with that?

        If you are sure with that, then you’re part of the problem.

  49. Webmaster,

    This time, I would say this dud’s comment should be thrown to spam folder.

    The most idiot commenter I’ve ever encountered in this blog.

  50. Jonas/ sanjo, it is you who takes crying lessons from Kris. Are you resentful that others of your ilk have plum assignments and you are assigned to take us on? Is your life that empty that you go into an enemy camp,and just insult? Double barreled i d s. I won’t tell you t leave though like Kris you lack so much attention you will settle getting some from GRP writers and frequent posters. Sounds like you could use a hug. Just get it from Grace Lee or all the other Noynoy decoys.

      1. Thank you Trish. Five years worth of blogging on different topics available here. http://cornholigogs.multiply.com Including my thoughts on Noynoy’s campaign from the time he was thinking of running until well after election. Other topics, movies, street stories, photo essays , music , culture etc.

  51. everyone here can cite countless examples of pinoys who were born in a disadvantaged situation but worked hard and ended in the “elite” group. isnt this evidence that our society can also produce the pro-elite and pro-excellence? there are also those who were born with all the opportunities but didnt take advantage and slack off. the author has been pressured into coming up with a catchy title for the article, this for me is a very complex issue.

    you cant claim to write about the “progress” of our country, just chalk it off to an-elite mentality and call it a day hehehe thats just lazy.

    filipinos didnt vote for these people because theyre anti-elite. there are lots of reasons that are interrelated. i dont claim to know these reasons though someone should study this.

    1. @jaks

      “everyone here can cite countless examples of pinoys who were born in a disadvantaged situation but worked hard and ended in the “elite” group. isnt this evidence that our society can also produce the pro-elite and pro-excellence? there are also those who were born with all the opportunities but didnt take advantage and slack off.”

      The Philippines is indeed capable of producing “elite” people, yet they receive little to no support at best, and sheer hatred at worst. Meanwhile, the “anti-elite” have nothing to show for it and yet they can easily win the favor of the masses by simply proclaiming they’re “pro-masa”.

      “you cant claim to write about the “progress” of our country, just chalk it off to an-elite mentality and call it a day hehehe thats just lazy.”

      Except that GRP can write about the progress of the country by pointing out and revealing just what is wrong with this country. And oh wow, you think GRP is the kind of blog that can just chalk anything the writers don’t like about the country as anti-elite. How amusing. And it shows just how lazy your way of thinking is, as well.

      “filipinos didnt vote for these people because theyre anti-elite.”

      Yeah. PNoy getting into office when his credentials include “being an Aquino” and nothing else, and Erap being the runner-up despite having been guilty of a serious crime years before(and got impeached for it) is totally not an “anti-elite” reason.

      1. 1. elite people have support pinoys love achievers. some elites are not covered by the press so how can i support someone i haven heard of hehe

        2. they should be more specific instead of everyday announcing theyve discovered “what is wrong with this country”

        3. its just elections we have our reasons i myself voted for gordon not because im pro-elite hehehe

        it just boils down to the author. low standards of excellence, intellectual laziness, romanticizing ineptitude are indeed negative to us (obvious) i would have preferred to hear more about why some of us are that way. including myself sometimes. instead she had to go with our nation’s progress for some audience impact.

    2. Sorry, but anti-elite mentality can be considered as mediocre thinking. If you’re ok with that, then the Philippines would never progress.

      It seems yours is an anti-intellectual comment.

      1. how brilliant captain obvious. anti elite is mediocre thinking. mediocre thinking is anti elite. its circular and doesnt add anything. this is your idea of an intellectual comment as a grp fanboy

    3. @jaks

      No one said anything about our inability to produce elites or experts in any given field. On the contrary, some of us here are encouraging more Filipinos to strive harder in order to excel in their chosen field.

      You know what’s lazy? Writing a comment that says “there are lots of reasons that are interrelated. i dont claim to know these reasons though someone should study this.”

      If you can’t refute the claims, then you should refrain from acting like you know something about the topic you consider too “complex” for you. You admit to missing the point but you still had the nerve to give your own conclusions about it. You are just exhibiting mediocre behaviour.

      1. maam congrats. how many people are seeking to innovate and improve our country and somehow you have it all figured out in one blog post.

        do we as a people (or any other people) necessarily have a singular “mentality” ?

        1. You know, we can never progress if we always resort to ‘bahala na’ and other negative thinking.

          I wanna ask you this: So you prefer a government whored by media, telling you that everything is ok, and never wanted to look forward for progress in society but to be part of a MEDIOCRITY?

          That question can also relate to Ilda’s blog post.

      2. hi ilda? great morning to all Realists. just want to share my story dont know if it has connection or what :). a few months ago i was having this weird feeling about thunders at night. and i was going crazy telling him its not thunder but the chinese attacking. i got over it though. last night he said to me “did you know that we(Philippines) only 1 fighter plane?” and i answered “yeah, and you were wondering why im going crazy thinking about chinese attacking.” i dont know if how can we still have pride on this matter? shouldnt we be afraid for our country? or should we just sit back and relax.

        1. @trish

          Your fear is very valid. Some people think that it is a laughing matter. It is not. Some think that the US will rescue us anyway. We can’t always rely on others for our security. Like what I said in my previous article: Scarborough standoff: a test of genuine Filipino patriotism

          Meanwhile, the Philippine military has no capability to wage war. The law, which was supposed to ensure military modernization is said to have failed due to corruption even within the military. It goes to show that even our own military is not patriotic enough. What more ordinary Filipino citizens.

          How do most societies protect their sovereignty anyway? If you ask those who have been engaged in military exercises more often than anybody else like the Israelis and the Americans, they will show you their sophisticated military equipment and their military troops’ impressive and deadly combat self-defense maneuvers. Even those who have not been engaged in military conflict for decades feel the need to upgrade or modernize their military capability because they feel safer and prouder as a nation when possessing of a competent military. Sometimes even when they don’t want any conflict, just showing that they have a competent military can help ward off any unprovoked attacks.

          Let’s face it, when it comes to protecting our sovereignty, our chances of succeeding using our existing military forces is slim.

        2. ilda.. very glad to know i want going crazy about this matter. i was just wondering why some people here differ on the idea of finding our faults to improve it and suggesting that we should take pride for we are better than other third world countries. why cant we meet in one idea to be the best. im very dissapointed to our dear president for tearing this country apart.

        3. The answer is simple. Some people do not want to admit that the country is a basketcase because it means we need to work harder. Working hard is the last thing most Filipinos want to do. So they fool themselves into thinking that we are okay or there are worst countries than the Philippines. They even get angry at people like us who point out what needs to be done to achieve first world status. In other words, majority are actually happy with mediocrity.

    4. “filipinos didnt vote for these people because theyre anti-elite. there are lots of reasons that are interrelated. i dont claim to know these reasons though someone should study this.”

      If sanjo/jonas were here, he’ll give you rebuttal. He claims that people voted for Lapid to spite the elite. Go a few notes back and you’ll see that. His thinking was probably a throwback from the approach widely used during the FPJ campaign. FPJ was also not as schooled as his opponents.

      You can also ask sociologists to answer that question of yours.

  52. @Benny

    You said that Ilda’s points are just assumptions, according to you. But why did you say that this article is misleading. Oh yeah, what Miriam did was a bad taste to many anti-intellectual fools (like yourself, maybe) but whatever it is, she speaks the truth.

    Yes, the ex-CJ was denied doing due process since the prosecution are vilifying the accused. Not to mention weak and questionable evidences came from questionable sources. And it wasn’t right after all.

  53. By just reading the title, I have realized that instead of saying “I hate the elite,” I should instead say “I hate the current ruling elite. We need to replace them with someone who’s better than them.”

    1. The thing is, the celebrities may have done something significant in showbiz, which is why they became popular or “influential” to begin with. However, their specialty is not in politics but in show business. So they should stick to what they know and leave the governing of the country to the experts in that field – those who spent years studying the law or the economy.

      1. I totally agree. Qualification must be followed in order for these comedians, reporters, talk show hosts, stuntman, drama king/queen, action heroes…. what do they have to offer. What does Alma Moreno has to offer? a conscience is not enough. We need a law requiring a 5 year college degree and at least 5-10 years practice of law or an economist to run for public office. I’m sorry to say, but it is the slap on the face of other politicians and the people who spent time and years mastering the politics and just be over shadowed by a showbiz personalities esp those “Baklas and Lesbians”.

      2. Had they stayed in showbiz, I could’ve respected them more. But oh well. They’re just after the money after all.

  54. “I thought that dude was just trolling. Sockpuppet pala.”

    Jonas, are you denying you’re a sockpuppet?

    “A sockpuppet is an online identity used for purposes of deception within an online community. In its earliest usage, a sockpuppet was a false identity through which a member of an Internet community speaks with or about himself or herself, pretending to be a different person,[1] like a ventriloquist manipulating a hand puppet.”

    And how many names are you using in this thread thread and why do you need to do that?

    Get a life kid?

  55. At si Bong Revilla pa kamo. May panahon pa syang mag shooting ng teleserye nyang INDIO.

    That is unfair competition sa part ng mga kandidatong hindi artista. Sya may libreng advertisement! Dapat hindi na sila payagan pang mag artista kasi hindi nila nagagawa ng tama ang trabaho nila.

    Puro pasikat nakakainis!

  56. Well said, and can I add that this oligarchs are using this anti-elite mindset to continue their reign in our country. The more stupid the masses are, the easier they can control them.

  57. He said he does not know anything about the law. How come he was judging someone who knows the Law…the more he should not do the judging because he does not know anything about the law. Go back to the movies Mr. Senator where your expertise will bail you out. Queer!

  58. Our country will achieve progress if our elite would only focus on a moral end, not the usual wealth and power. I wish our current elite would emulate the elite of pre-revolutionary Philippines (Rizal, Luna, Mabini, Bonifacio, Aguinaldo, Jacinto et al who attained their goal of independence), and work on liberating our country from the rotten system we are all bogged now.

  59. The real problem is this: we don’t know when is the right place to be elitist and when’s the right place to be anti-elitist! We got our sense of that all fucked up!

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