Temporary Solutions for Long-Term Problems: The Pinoy’s Most Common Response

My heart goes out to all those who helped Mary Jane Veloso escape her predicament. From those who prayed for her (I’m one of those who believe that prayer does indeed hold some power), those who pleaded for her case to those who chose to spare her from execution, you have my sincerest gratitude. But while her continued survival is indeed something to be thankful for, I would like to mention the fact that all we’ve really bought the poor woman is time. Who’s to say that the case won’t be investigated further until those in Indonesia choose to execute her anyway? Also, what of the many other OFW’s out there in the world who are facing the threat of death from being in death row, to being in the way of a national disaster to those in countries under the threat of war?

Indeed, I believe in the Jewish saying that “one life saved saves the world entire” but the problem here is all about how we, as a people, have failed to see the bigger picture and the greater threats that loom over our nation. While the spared life of Mary Jane Veloso is indeed good news, I think that it is simply too early for us to be celebrating.

long_term_futureOver the years, as I’ve come to realize, the solutions our society offers are at best only temporary and, at worst, merely a means of “sweeping things under the rug” rather than a permanent and progressive answer to our problems. The issue about Mary Jane Veloso is just one of these many problems that we aren’t facing the way we should. Remember, Mary Jane Veloso’s case could resume at any time and go through with her execution anyway and that we still have plenty of countrymen out there who are in death row right now as we speak.

Here are some of the things I’d like to point out to you:

The “Peace Agreement” with the MILF

Okay, I know this is getting old but I think it’s all the more reason that we start taking this seriously. As I’ve mentioned before, what the MILF is proposing isn’t even a “negotiation”, it’s essentially a “surrender”. Suppose we give in to their demands (like what the president is doing), would it really bring peace in Mindanao once and for all?

Here’s the problem, the MILF does not represent all the Muslims who live in Mindanao. Were we to give a peace of Mindanao to the MILF, other groups will become jealous and will probably clamor for their own territory in Mindanao. Like the hydra of Greek mythology, cutting off just one head will cause two or three more to sprout from the severed stump of its neck. Also of note, will the MILF really stop with just the BBL or will they eventually go on to ask for more territory and greater autonomy.

President Aquino’s statement about approving the BBL or counting body bags best counts as something similar to putting a ban-aid to a skull fracture. At the end of the day, it’s more or less delaying the inevitable. Sooner or later, the MILF or other groups will get it in their heads to seize even more territory and one can only imagine how our government and our society will react then.

The CCT

“Catch a fish for a man and you feed him fish for one day. Teach a man to catch a fish and you feed him fish for the rest of his life.” The saying goes something like that anyway. I’m not really sure.

But the point is, by letting someone make a good living for themselves, they gain the opportunity to have a prosperous life and a promising future for their families. However, if you just give them money, nothing will stop them from spending all that money on trivial stuff like gambling, drinks or other vices all in one day which will subsequently drive them to bankruptcy again.

While giving money to the poor is a good thing and can allow one to better oneself, it is not a guarantee for progress. Instead, it all depends on the person spending the money. Unfortunately, based on the number of “one-week millionaires” (lottery winners who lose all their winnings because of overspending in just the course of a week) we keep hearing about, you can see just how “wise” Pinoys are when it comes to money.

Now, from my own opinion, giving people the opportunity to earn their own sizeable keep might be a different story. With that in mind, they’ll be able to make their own money by working and prevent them from relying too much on dole-outs. In the end, it becomes a win-win situation because you get a productive worker (or at least an average worker, at that) and you’re able to give someone the opportunity to feed his or her family on a regular basis.

The Case with OFWs

Okay, going back to my sentiments in the first paragraphs of this article…

The fact that Mary Jane Veloso was spared was a “win” on our part. However, I regret to say that what’s been done is at best a “delaying tactic” much like the first two examples mentioned above. There is still a chance that the Indonesian government will find more reasons to have Mary Jane Veloso executed. Worse yet, and I cannot emphasize it enough, there are still other OFWs out there who may be in danger or worse.

Like the second point mentioned above, I think we should find a means to provide more opportunities for our countrymen instead of keeping the potentially dangerous system we have now. Why force them to travel overseas to make ends meet for their families when we can provide business opportunities and promising careers for them here in the Philippines. By keeping the oligarch-centered system we have, we are essentially just making the rich richer and the poor poorer and needlessly endangering the lives of productive Filipino citizens.

Let’s push to have more job opportunities with fair deals here in the Philippines instead of forcing our countrymen to risk themselves in potentially dangerous settings outside the country…

print

74 Comments on “Temporary Solutions for Long-Term Problems: The Pinoy’s Most Common Response”

  1. Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot?
    Dont get me wrong, I am firmly against the death penalty. But wasnt she who carried the drugs?

    Secondly:
    “But the point is, by letting someone make a good living for themselves, they gain the opportunity to have a prosperous life and…”

    this is sheer impossible when a person (lets say a daughter) have to pay money (take care and support) to her own parents.

    This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty. This is also why the current and all future PH governments will keep their status quo with being corrupt and taking/paying bribes.
    Because of this family-culture, the population is no threat to the government, no threat to RC church.

    This family-culture makes each member implicitly and explicitly a slave of the system where nobody can escape from.

    Only when each member of the family can really pursue her/his own goals without the burden of “paying back”, only then you can start thinking of becoming a prosperous country.

    So pls start modernizing the family-culture first. Stop the Delikadesa, encourage your daughters to be much more than just an OFW house maid; encourage and stimulate your daughter’s real talents.

    Pls modernize the mindset that life is not revolving around getting babies and getting married. But in the current ruling family-culture, this will go on and on for centuries to come.

    Aim for the moon, raise the bar and rise to the occassion.

    Failure is a choice; success is a choice.

    PS: if the Indonesian government is consistent then they should execute MJV still afterall. How would it be possible that the actual recruiter (who didnt carry any drugs into Indonesia) will be shot to death. That will be a precedent. Getting killed for doing nothing.

    1. MJV either knew what was going on, or she was a complete idiot. Airlines warn people over and over again not to carry stuff for others. If you know you’re going to a third-world shithole with dubious or draconian laws, you’re doubly careful. But, of course, Filipinos think the rules don’t apply to them, do they?

      I completely agree that ‘family-culture’ is the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. But let’s call it what it is (freeloading and slavery) rather than dignifying it with the word ‘culture’.

      Still, I think it goes without saying that the government and the church benefit hugely from mendicancy and the OFW-subsidized welfare programme. CCTs are just more of the same. A dependent, lazy and ignorant population will vote for anyone who gives them the most handouts and indulges their backwardness. Creating a functioning economy involves the poor getting off their ass to do more than just drinking, breeding, gambling and squabbling like children. The politicians know that that’s just not going to happen.

      1. Marius,
        I actually dont blame MJV that much. She was a victim of ignorance and naivity and she paid a huge prize for that. I read that the recruiter promised her a job and easy money and that she (MJV) comes from a poor background. A typical ABC and 1, 2, 3 if you ask me (for the recruiter). She (MJV) was an easy victim.

        Sorry Marius, but for me its really culture. A culture of being family focused,family oriented and family centered (and you can add to that god-focused, god-oriented and god-centered). Its widespreak and a national disaster/plaque.

        Many of my pinay friends tell me that my former pinay partner comes from a middle class family. But when I told her (my former partner) that I dont allow her to send money to her parents (and to uncles/aunts, nieces and nephews and who not) she almost cried like a baby.

        (without being arrogant or boasting) but – in my country – we are raised to be independent, autonomous and critical in our thinking. I really miss such qualifications in the Philippines completely.

        They keep on praying to god for the delaying of the excution of MJV. Now who is fooling who? Can we pls wake up and see the real truth!!??

        Finally, because of this family-culture (sorry), the bashing of the government, the bashing of the PH tv channels by most GRP writers is useless. As long as this culture dont and wont change, the government, TV channels, the church will only benefit and gain from it.

        1. Out of curiosity, how does politics work in the Netherlands, Mr. Haighton?

          Could you give me a brief background of some of your top officials. I just need something for a slight comparison.

        2. Thaddeus,
          not sure what you wanna know. But if you dont believe me pls do your own research.

          We do have corruption here (everybody knows that) done by politicians. In most cases on provincial or city level. But they are brought to justice. (here is an example: http://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2015/04/02/vvd-beeindigt-lidmaatschap-van-rey/).

          Our current prime minister – Mark Rutte – is like your president not married (http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Rutte). Mark is very close – politically – with David Cameron (England). They both share the same age – more or less.

          But the corruption is not widespread in my country. Its more an exception than a rule.

          Furthermore, previous and current dutch governments make it possible to pursue your own dreams. We have legal same sex marriages, we have legal divorce laws and we have a strict seperation between state and church (thank god). The different relgions we have here are powerless, completely powerless. Even the religious political parties (SGP & CU & CDA) are way too small to change laws the way they want. The worst politial party is by far SGP and CU. They both want back to the middle ages where women have only one right, the kitchen.

          http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staatkundig_Gereformeerde_Partij (SGP; Dutch)

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reformed_Political_Party (SGP; English)

          https://www.sgp.nl/

          http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/ChristenUnie (CU; Dutch)

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ChristianUnion (CU)

          http://www.christenunie.nl/nl/

          And more importantly:
          we, kids, say thank you to our parents for procreating us, for raising us the best way they did. But now we have to start our own future without them. We have to stand on our own 2 feet. We, kid, dont stay living with our parents till we get married. We will fly away when we are 18. We want and need our privacy (a concept that is completely unknown in the Philippines). We, kids, dont carry the burden to take care of and to supoort our parents financially.

          We have a famous soccer player who publicly tells us he doesnt want to carry the name of his father. I dont see that happening in Phili.

        3. To add, bec I dont know what your president’s salary is:
          Mark Rutte’s annual salary is Euro 178,000. This equals approx PHP 8 million.

        4. Actually, I only asked because I was wondering about a choice I made not so long ago…

          An Uncle of mine offered me a chance at politics by giving me the chance to take up a pol-sci course. Of course, I was tempted to take it, considering my social convictions. However, he made mention that if I made it in a position of power, I would have to find a way to support the rest of my clan somehow.

          I decided to back out considering the catch involved.

          Now tell me, did I just make a bad-call? Or was turning him down the right choice in the end.

          As a Dutchman looking at a bunch of dumb Pinoys, was I a wuss for turning him down? It’s one question that still bothers me to this day…

        5. “…support the rest of my clan somehow.”

          I call that emotional and psychological blackmail. And I loathe the word “clan”. It always makes me think of maffia practises.

          If you are really free (without any burden) you work for yourself. You find a partner who also has a full time job and then the 2 of you will have quite a prosperous life. Go and have a career, make money, and spend it wisely. Does that sound selfish to you? Then pls stake care of your “clan” and stay poor. But in that case: dont cry me a river. And dont start to blame your government. It is always your choice and your decision.

          All I want to say is this: as long as kids are ordered/demanded to put money back to their parents, nothing will change.

        6. Thaddeus,
          “As a Dutchman looking at a bunch of dumb Pinoys,…”

          I am not looking down on pinays. But the solution to get out of poverty is around the corner, in front of their noses. But they are too afraid to change their family culture. And this fear helps the government, it helps the church. The solution lies within the family. But probably that is a taboo to talk about by GRP writers. It seems also for the GRP writers that the family is a sacred, not to be touched issue. Instead they (the GRP writers) want the government to change. And that wont happen.

        7. I mean, from your perspective, should I have taken up politics with their blessing anyway? Gotten my hands dirty for the greater good and all that?

          I just want to know if you think I was wrong in turning down his offer…

        8. Becoming a politician in my country doesnt require a special form of education or course. You graduated in Economics from a university is enough.

          As long as you understand that the Philippine society is who you work for as politician then you could have done it. If you only do it for your own ego, for the status then you will probably become as corrupt as all PH politicians.

        9. I mean, I can probably do more than just blog (like what I’m doing now).

          But then, I’d just be a puppet. A slave. If I become a leader, I want to be more than that.

          I could probably do more as a politician but then I’d have to pay lip service to a family who probably don’t even know what the responsibility of leadership entails…

        10. Yes indeed as politician you can do much more than writing and bashing and blaming the government. Change has to come from within. From within the government and from within the family.

          But if you see all your fellow politicians being corrupt and taking bribes then what will you do?

        11. Robert, the origin of the word clan is Scottish Gaelic and dates back to the 15th century. Clann meaning offspring.

          Scottish families are called clans

    2. “Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot?”

      The Indonesian government needed to answer this otherwise other countries will think the Philippines is given special treatment. Country leaders of those scheduled to be executed all make an appeal and was rejected except PNoy. What’s the catch?

    3. Personally, I wanna be convinced beyond reasonable doubt if she’s fully aware of what she’s doing (hence should be execute as per Indonesian law) or was simply duped person, forced to find work elsewhere due extreme hardship in the Philippines.

      1. She (MJV) was an easy target for the recruiter(s). The recruiters lost the drugs and MJV became collateral damage.
        Being ignorant and naive is not a crime. But boy oh boy I hope she learned her lessons (if she gets out of this).

        For Indonesian law it is not important whether a person is/was aware of what one is doing. She broke the law. I even think a Brazilian was autistic and he got executed.

        MJV was 30 years old, right? She should have known better. She wasnt a 12 year old child anymore.

    4. “Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot?”

      That sounds like a question the Indonesia govt are now expecting the PH govt/judiciary to answer. If they don’t get a favorable response, then I’m afraid Grimwald is right. All we did is just buy her some time.

    5. Robert, you may see things like the family-oriented culture as a problem, and I may happen to agree with you, but you have to understand that is how they like it to be – damaging or not.

      Imposing your views on what Filipinos need to change, even with good intentions, is no different to Christian missionaries trying to save people’s souls.

      1. Dave,
        I was and am afraid of that, every time I comment here (being labeled as the Christian missionary).

        BUT

        I, personally, dont gain and dont benefit from a possible change in family-culture (is there any money in it for me? Where? How?).

        All I want(ed) to share is, that I think I know how people can change their future step by step. And that change wont come from the government and wont come from the RC church.

        All I know is that that is the source of the the problems Filipinos are facing. And thats why, I dont understand why all or most GRP writers keep on bashing the government.

        Not even an EDSA4 or EDSA5 will make any progress as long as the “family” problems are not solved.

        I am always very reluctant to comment here critically bec no Filipino will probably accept criticism from a foreigner. Who the hell does Mr. Robert Haighton thinks he is? (Right?)

        1. All I know is that that is the source of the the problems Filipinos are facing. And thats why, I dont understand why all or most GRP writers keep on bashing the government.

          What the…? We will write about whatever the hell we feel like writing about. If you don’t like it, then go somewhere else.

        2. And why do you blame the writers of GRP? We can’t control the behaviour of the majority. We can only write about it.

        3. Ilda, pls for god’s sake, I am not blaming you and your co-writers. I only think (or arrogantly said: I know) that the people you address (the government) dont give a shit (Pardon me my French).

          The government – unfortunately – is there to use and abuse the population and the government is sitting there for their own ego. Now and then the government will give something to the people (RH law) to keep them quiet again.

          The key or the power is in the hand of the individual. And if each individual can find their equal friend to start the battle and fight, only then the population becomes a real threat to all PH institutions. But not the same fight as EDSA. As we can see now, EDSA didnt change anything.
          But that individual has to give up that “family-culture” otherwise, that fight/battle wont work. The individual has to be free of any burden. Thats how it happened in my country starting from the 1960s.

        4. Quit expecting too much from the writers here. We will write whatever we want to write about. If I want to focus on exposing the stupidity of the culture through the actions of the voters and the elected officials, I will do so even without your permission.

          Now, I suggest you create your own blogsite and write your own articles to satisfy your need.

        5. That would be very arrogant from me to think you need my permission.

          Apart from that I wish you all the best with achieving your goals with your writings. I hope we will see each other in heaven in about 200 years from now and will see then what the results were. Probably changed not much.

        6. Yeah, so what if you think we’re just wasting our time? Then you are even worse because you are wasting your time on people YOU THINK are just wasting their time.

        7. Look Mr. Haighton, Ilda’s right. We’re only writers and there’s only so much we can do. Heck, I myself am a ridiculously average guy in real life. I bet a cutie like Ms Ilda won’t even look at me twice if we ever ran into each other.

          So don’t expect us to cause so much change. It’s like a few thousand of us vs. I dunno 90 million zombies.

        8. Dear Mr./Sir Grimwald,
          I sincerely do think that GRP and I (independently from each other) have the same goal and objective for the Philippines.

          But I think the road GRP is driving on towards their goal and objective is not the fastest road (I will not say the wrong road). And only there, on that fact, we (GRP and I) seem to differ.

          I know that Ilda (and probably you and other GRP writers) doesnt care what I think, but I do think that the government will never give an inch and “come down” to the people. The politicans do not benefit anything from doing that. And unfortunately, I dont foresee any change in that mentality among politicians anywhere soon.

          It would be nice for both all GRP writers and me to be able to witness a full change for the better of all (or most) Filipinos in our life time. But I am not that optimistic at all.

      2. Dave,
        For many years, I have been busy/trying to find answers to why the Filipinos live the way they live.

        Its probably not fair to compare one country with another country but I am just interested and curious what makes people tick.

        So far, I havent experienced any form of corruption while being in the Philippines (except maybe that strange airport terminal fee one has to pay).

        We, the dutch didnt get rich over night. That was a fight and struggle taking many years. And that fight was fought “bottoms-up” and not “top-down”.

        What I see, every time when I am in the Philippines, is that peoples minds work very simple and very basic. While our minds, on the other hand, work according to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.

        Dave, the family-oriented culture is not damaging (bec for them it works) but it doesnt bring them prosperity, it doesnt bring growth, it doesnt bring freedom. And that is why, the Philippines will still be a poor nation the coming 2 centuries. Is that what they really want?

        1. @ Robert, OOPS, you done did it, insulted the frail ego of the Filipino, tsk tsk !!! I see that you are only out for their own good fortune and somehow they take it the wrong way. Filipino’s are way too easily insulted, they are like the Black people in the states. BUT the real ghetto blacks in the states though are the ones that have nothing but their pride and take insults as an excuse to kill people.So ,Filipino’s are a step up from them but still, if they could get over themselves and have the nerve to all just rampage the state into submission…..things could change within 2-3 years, even less, I MEAN SUBSTANTIALLY CHANGE, BUT NO !! They are too busy getting insulted.

        2. Bing Bong,
          My comment (criticism) is NOT to insult and/or to offend and/or to embarrass.

          I had many conversations with my former Filipina girlfriend about probably all aspects of the Philippine culture. I only told her that what I observed didnt and doesnt lead to anything good/positive/better.

          Probably they and she see/saw me as a foreigner who barges in their country telling them what they are doing wrong. Nobody likes that at first. But hey, I also do get comments and crticism from my own family members, friends and even collegues. Are they all wrong? No, they are not. So when the anger of getting criticised has subdued, I start to think about their criticism. And then I apologize to them all and change my behavior. Not to please them per se but for myself so that I wont and dont make those mistakes again.

          To me its very simple. I live about 80-90 years and during those years I have to get most out of life. If I would do things the same way my parents did or if I would keep making the same mistakes (over and over) then my life would become and would be very miserable.

          In short: I still dont understand exactly why Filipinos live the way they live. I dont understand why they dont want to progress, evolve and improve their lives. Its so easy to make that step forward.

        3. @ Robert, I dont understand it either. It was also obvious that what you stated was not meant to be an insult. Insults are words that are meaningless 90+% of the time, the rest is slander and can be dealt with legally, or illegally.

  2. Well, this short-termism can not only be found among Filipinos but also among members of the working (and non-working) class in Europe.

    People who are used to having no future learn to think only of the present. Dr. Phil Zimbardo writes about this in one of his books, writing that cultures with more future-orientation are more successful but have less fun than those who only live in the present.

    Possibly the reasons are to be found in the colonial experience, but also in the fact that the Philippines used to live in conditions of tropical abundance – but now of course cannot count on that because the population is too big to live in the ancient Pacific way with enough fish and yams around.

  3. Miss Velosa’s execution is just delayed. Sooner or late, she will face the Firing Squad.

    We don’t have good paying jobs in the Philippines. We have university graduates, working in call centers.

    So, people have to go overseas, to seek employment. We remit money (I’m an OFW); and the Oligarchs control the Banking system. They profit immensely on this financial set up.

    The Philippine economy would sink; without the OFW remittances. This is the “Daan Matuwid” of Aquino; going straight to his pocket…

    1. Haven’t you noticed the contradiction in your statement?

      1) The Philippine economy would sink without the OFW remittances.

      2) So, people have to go overseas, to seek employment. We remit money (I’m an OFW).

      You don’t have to go abroad. Quite the opposite. STOP going abroad and create local economies independent of the banking system. The flow of dollars will stop and the oligarchs will fall.

      Not going to happen, is it? The last thing the Filipino wants to do is (a) defy the parents orders to send back cash and (b) co-operate with people who aren’t part of the clan.

      Poverty is the natural outcome of the Filipino mindset.

  4. “I’m one of those who believe that prayer does indeed hold some power”

    Sorry Grimwald, but after several years of following your well-informed posts you have just lost all credibility with me. Please come back down from whatever planet you are on.

    1. Dude, I’ve only been here since January so it can’t be several years.

      Also, I have mentioned possessing religious beliefs so please be prepared for similar statements…

      1. LOL, Grimwald, this guy must be miserable. 4 months seems like years to him,LOL ! Maybe, MAYBE, give him a break…he obviously needs it.

  5. @ 092Toro0055Hayden :
    “We don’t have good paying jobs in the Philippines. We have university graduates, working in call centers. ” I am a statistic.
    sadly.

    @Grimwald: Been following since your 1st post, i love the topic but i was dissappointed.

    dont get me wrong, the idea of temporary solutions to long term problems is a good one though can you also apply to almost everythimg else that is wrong with the country? Also why do most of the leaders never seem to think of long term consequences?

    Do all of them follow the KKK rule???

    1. @Pilosopo Socrates:

      I am very lucky to get out of the Philippines; after I graduated from College. Otherwise, I would have been one of the Statistics, working in a Call Center.

      Now, I am earning a decent pay, as an OFW, with a career that is in line with my College degree…

      1. @11Hayden0066Toro I still respect your POV.

        I wish I could get out as well, i have relatives in the States/ Canada but the very idea of leaving is still look down upon as being a traitor to your country in my social circle.

        The bright side I could say is that I am not part of the unemployed and trying to secure as part of the intelligent and aware upper class. (I am not part of any dynasty BTW).

  6. The primary reason why nothing gets ever done in the Philippines is because they consider straight up truth and honesty to be “disrespectful” and thus attack the messenger and never bother to listen to the message.

    Many temporary solutions are partly made with the intention of not offending anyone. Thus we have the wreck of a country we see today.

  7. I have one experience similar to the title of this post.

    A couple of years ago, the establishment beside our apartment were demolishing their 10ft+ hollow block fence, the fence being shared by them and our compound. Small pieces of concrete were falling towards our area but being a Filipino, we ignored it despite safety issue. Makisama ka na lang ika nga.

    But what is not forgiving is when they left the top 5ft+ portion of the wall hanging.

    One day, after a couple of hours that they left the job site, (when I concluded that they must have stopped working already)I immediately went to the Barangay Captain (not the owner nor to the project in charge for reasons I assume you know already) to complain. I explained to him that with enough lateral force (earthquake or wind, or etc.) that dangling portion will fall down and god knows what will happen to the person or persons who will be at the wrong spot at the wrong time. Without first inspecting the scene, he told us to report immediately to the municipal engineer.

    And so we (me and my neighbor who’s apartment unit’s door is where exactly where I fear ground zero will be) went immediately to the engineering office as advised.

    I was happy that our discussion with the officials didn’t take 10 mins. They immediately stood up from their desks and rushed to our place.

    They did inspected the scene, they did asked questions to the personnel who were there. The problem is everything stopped to the issuance of a “notice.” The official handed a piece of paper to the man in charge at the demolition site at that time and told them that if they did not improve the situation until the next day, they will suspend their demolition permit. That’s it. And they left. What is my problem?-I was hoping these officials were going to exercise their authority to avoid an eminent danger. I was expecting that they will stand there, instruct these construction workers to demolish the whole wall to avoid anyone getting hurt otherwise they will revoke their permit right there and then. But instead they left. When I asked one of the officials what they did he told me, wait ’til tomorrow. WTF!!! Can they tell the Grim Reaper the same?

    The temporary solution – the piece of paper that contains probably a warning. But what about the wall that could fall on someone – “wait ’til tomorrow”. F*ck that!

    1. Filipinos love pieces of paper. The country is awash with pointless forms and procedures. I used to think that Filipino politicians had simply misunderstood how functioning governments use paper and procedures – to create and to record action – and had just mindlessly copied the superficialities.

      I’ve now realised they’re not that stupid. The purpose of the paper-shuffling is precisely to HIDE the fact that they’re not doing anything useful, and don’t intend to. You’ll waste all your time and money filling in forms and following the procedures, until you’re eventually exhausted and will leave the bureaucrats alone to do what they do best: nothing.

  8. The so-called ‘family-culture’ is NOT the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. It is NEITHER “freeloading” NOR “slavery”!

    I beg to differ with the concept of ‘family-culture’ which Mr. Robert Haighton and Marius espouses!

    In their own words:

    Robert Haighton says:
    “This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty.”

    “A culture of being family focused,family oriented and family centered (and you can add to that god-focused, god-oriented and god-centered). Its widespreak and a national disaster/plaque.”

    marius says:
    “I completely agree that ‘family-culture’ is the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. But let’s call it what it is (freeloading and slavery) rather than dignifying it with the word ‘culture’.”

    The two gentlemen, probably, having born in a totally different situation from the rest of us, have never had the experience of being deprieved, denied of proper education and social services, of being stucked or situated in a time and space wherein lack of resources and opportunity is the norm. Of course it’s gonna be a different view! Talk is Cheap if your outside the picture! If you’re outside looking in!

    Though the view of encouragement is commendable it is but only an empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk as far as I am concerned!

    In the Philippines, contrary to Mr. Haighton’s ‘family-culture’, the general view is not limited to one’s family alone. Here, we have the spirit of “Bayanihan”, which refers to a spirit of communal unity or effort to achieve a particular objective. The nation’s rally (as with the family of nations who joined in support) to cause MJV’s recent grant of reprieve, in a way, is an example that can be attributed because of that!

    And we’ve done that so many tines! A Family united together with the extended family can help out a less fortunate family member to be able to finish a college education. The neighborhood in a community can help out in putting out a fire to help out save a property. In unity we find strength!

    We acknowledge though that it’s not only unique to us for it’s a universal concept common to the World embraced since from the very beginning, to wit:

    – Jesus in Matthew 12:25 “…Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand”

    – In Alexander Dumas’ “The Three Musketeers”: “And now gentlemen, all for one, one for all – that is our motto, is it not?”

    – Ancient Greek storyteller Aesop, wrote the phrase “United we stand, divided we fall” in his fable “The Four Oxen and the Lion” and indirectly in “The Bundle of Sticks”.

    In today’s popular culture, the Dutch band “De Heideroosjes” use the same phrases above to the lyrics in their song “Time is Ticking Away”.

    “I don’t need many friends
    but those I have are real
    Together we’re down for life
    United we stand, divided we fall
    All for one and one for all”

    And even our very own quintessential Filipino rockband Juan De la Cruz Band likewise rallied a nation in their generation in their classic “Ang Himig Natin”.

    “Ang himig natin
    Ang inyong awitin
    Upang tayo’y magsama-sama
    Sa langit ng pag-asa”

    The problem I can see is more on the selfishness (preventing someone to make a deed even if you have the power to do so), insensitivity (the nerve to call someone idiot while being clueless of what actually is), prejudice and apathy towards others (the Poor Underprivileged Many) of the Rich Privileged Powerful Few. The problem also arises because “THE FEW” will not be bothered in conscience because they will still find security and comfort with themselves that they are correct because it has brought them “THE RESULT”. And those oftenly-bashed and labelled “dumb”, “lazy”, “stupid”, and “ignorant” (THE MANY) by the so-called “THINKING(?) GRP COMMENTERS” just couldn’t get it!

    While the MANY posses the NUMBERS, still, the FEW holds the resources! Not willing to give, and to share, and the greediness to acquire more than others is the root of the problem! In short, if ten people can get along and can able to share with a box of pizza with eight slices, then we can have no problem! And who will effect this?! Whether we like it or not, it’s still “THE-POWERS-THAT-BE”! And they keep winning for years!!!

    BTW, Delicadeza is a Spanish term which when translated in English means daintiness. It is defined as an act of being refined or delicate in tastes or manners. Commonly it is referred to as a sense of propriety or how to behave rightly in all circumstances. Delicadeza conveys decency, tact, decorum, courtesy, refinement, refinement, sensitivity…

    Just sayin’ would you trust someone without “DELICADEZA”?!

    1. @The many and the few,

      re: your BTW
      here is a text that I copied many years ago from a Filipina’s page regarding her “definition” of Delikadesa.

      “Delikadesa
      Many western men choose to build a relationship with a Filipina girl. Some even choose to marry a Filipina. But what makes Filipino women so wanted?
      1. Filipina girls are renowned for their beauty. They surely stand out among Asian women in terms of charm and femininity. If you think other way you probably have never seen Angela Perez Baraquio the first Asian American and Filipino American who was crowned Miss America 2001 and Miss Hawaii.
      2. Filipina girls are a delight to be around because of their disposition and personality. Since birth Filipinas are raised in a special sense of honour called Delikadesa (or Delicadeza). Delicadeza is a Spanish term which when translated in English means daintiness. It is defined as a sense of propriety, an act of being refined or delicate in tastes and manners. It is Delikadesa what gives Filipino women such admirable qualities and distinguishes them from Western ladies. You will never find a proper Filipina bring shame onto herself and her family by lying, cheating, stealing, and running around with different men or flunking out of school. It is one of the meanings of delicadeza pride in doing the right thing.
      3. Filipinas are understanding, patient and composed. Most Filipina girls would never engage in a quarrel or a loud argument simply because this wouldn’t suit a real lady. They are taught to speak politely, with a gentle tone of voice. Arguing is just not acceptable, along with public criticism. This soft spoken, quiet and understanding nature of the Filipina ladies is the desired trait that Filipinas strive towards.
      4. Filipina girls are generous and naturally caring and supportive. The common spirit of survival has united the Filipinos for centuries making generosity and loyalty towards family a time-honoured tradition. The caring and supportive nature of the Filipinas is apparent in the fact that there are no booming businesses for retirement homes or orphanages in the Philippines. They would never abandon a child or a member of the family in need.
      5. Filipina girls believe in a one-man one-woman relationship. Since there is no “absolute divorce” in the Philippines, Filipinas are raised in a high regard for the sanctity of marriage and consider it a life long commitment. Some, in fact many who marry these Filipina beauties, swear they make the best wives in the world: loyal, loving and faithful past death.”

      After reading it, I was flabbergasted about missing a lot of qualifications. Probably a true Delikadesa woman doesnt know/feel anger, anxiety, being pissed off. In short, I read the manufactory text of the manual of a man made robot here and not a real warm blooded human being.

      Dear Mr. The many and the few,
      I wouldnt have expected anything less from a Filipino man. You dont want to give up your status quo and you show indeed the form of crab mentality here. You are afraid that someone in your own family may make it big and you coming out as a loser (being left behind). And exactly that mentality makes it that your nation will stay poor. Believe me, I dont care. So pls dont cry me a river next time when your house/village is swept away during a typhoon, flood or earth quake.
      pls be my quest and procreate like rabbits. The gap between your country and the rich west will increase more and more.

      You are defending a systen that you know is not working.

      But like I said earlier, no need to change it bec of me. Who the fuck am I, right?

      1. I think you got it wrong! Sorry, English is not my primary language! But here below is what we are talking about:

        1.
        Robert Haighton says:
        “This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty.”

        The Many And The Few says:
        The so-called ‘family-culture’ is NOT the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. It is NEITHER “freeloading” NOR “slavery”!

        Here, we have the spirit of “Bayanihan” (which is, in a way, is a “family-culture”! of cooperation!), which refers to a spirit of communal unity or effort to achieve a particular objective.

        I cite examples:

        – A Family united together with the extended family can help out a less fortunate family member to be able to finish a college education. (The Family helping out to achieve a goal!)

        – The neighborhood in a community can help out in putting out a fire to help out save a property. In unity we find strength! (To achieve an objective!)

        2.
        Robert Haighton says:
        You dont want to give up your status quo and you show indeed the form of crab mentality here. You are afraid that someone in your own family may make it big and you coming out as a loser (being left behind). And exactly that mentality makes it that your nation will stay poor.

        The Many And The Few says:
        In short, if ten people can get along and can able to share with a box of pizza with eight slices, then we can have no problem! And who will effect this?! Whether we like it or not, it’s still “THE-POWERS-THAT-BE”! (The Government, The Business Sector, The Media, Influential Leaders … Those holding powers and the resources to effect change!)

        3.
        Robert Haighton says:
        You are defending a systen that you know is not working.

        The Many And The Few says:
        I am depending nothing! I just identified the Problem! (I think!)

        1. Let me try to stay polite and decent myself for once.

          After spending 6 years (from 2009) in your country, I think I know how your system of “family-culture” works.
          All I tried pointing out is that the Philippines can become a bigger (not by population) and richer/wealthier country with a much better giovernment, with a much better education than now.

          With your system, the government wont change to becoming friendlier and more social and democratic to the people.
          With your system, the church wont change to becoming firendlier and more social to the people.
          With your system, the TV programs wont change to becoming more intellectual and more social to the people.
          With your system, education wont change to becoming more friendly and more social to the people.
          With your system, wages/salary wont change either to becoming more friendly and more social to the people.

          – For me, your system is build on FEAR (afraid to be left behind);
          – Your system is build without the concept of being responsible for yourself (everybody will take care of everybody, so why should I behave responsible? My mess will be cleared and cleaned up by others).
          – Your system is build on the focus of a patriarchal dominated system (women are 2nd class citizens; see the declaration and institution of Delikadeza aka Maria Clara).
          – Your system doesnt allow spontaneity.
          – Your system doesnt allow criticism (Hiya). Hence we can not progress. People will not learn from their – stupid – mistakes bec we dont allow criticism. I am too afriad to scold you bec it might make you feel embarrassed (Hiya).
          – Your system is focused inwardly (only the direct family, and the extended family) and we are so tight knit and so dependent on each other that it looks like an incestous relationship. People are blinded by the system.

          Personally, I find the system sufficating and it puts me in a straight jacket from birth. Always having to think about my family first.
          Furthermore, bec of your system I really see no space and no room for privacy.

          But pls tell me why I always see a lot of broken families while you are so proud of that system? It doesnt match and doesnt add up for me.

          I also find your governmental laws very sufficating. I have nothing to choose from. There is only one flavor.

          Last question to you:
          I have a gift (god given or genes?) and I found a job with those gifts/talents. It pays me enough money. Pls tell me why I should share my wealth with others? I work for it, let others work with their talents.

          Is it okay with you I donate money to Greenpeace, Amnesty International and for cancer research?

      2. “Probably a true Delikadesa woman doesnt know/feel anger, anxiety, being pissed off. In short, I read the manufactory text of the manual of a man made robot here and not a real warm blooded human being.”

        Mr. Haighton, “DELICADEZA” is NOT the Filipina (NOT the “..real warm blooded human being.”). Delicadeza is a Filipino trait practised or observed by a Cultured Individual, be it a man or woman or child!

    2. Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination?

      Sir The many and the few,
      we had your system and your family culture – the exact same way – till the 1960s. But daughters/women/wives started fighting that system. And they succeeded (thank god) and won. Now they are free. Women do the same things men do. Women have their own career and make their own money. And when I say career, I mean career.

      And yes it means that within one family there are winners and losers. So what? Success is a choice and you can have the same success. Dont you want to excel in being the best engineer? Dont you want the best lawyer?

      Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.

      So pls dont cry me a river next time when your house/village is swept away during a typhoon, flood or earth quake and dont beg for support from foreign governments. Pls help yourself. How many foreigners were there when you needed them during Hayian? You cant even look after yourself when in real deep shit. Your own government wont come to the rescue.

      Pls show me you dont need foreign aid and then we will talk again.

      1. “Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.”

        On the contrary, what we have is the concept of cooperation for the benefit of the many!

        In contrast to the Wall of China, which was built through years of forced labor and slavery, the Banaue Rice Terraces in Mountain Province was built through “Bayanihan”!

        1. “Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.”

          On the contrary, what we have is the concept of cooperation for the benefit of the many!

          In contrast to the Wall of China, which was built through years of forced labor and slavery, the Banaue Rice Terraces in Mountain Province was built through “Bayanihan”!

          If everybody is responsible for him/herself and doesnt make mistakes anymore, we dont need each other’s support and help. We can fix our own problems. I dont need your money anymore for putting my son to College.
          Or I dont need your money anymore to pay for my medicines. You get my drift?
          For me it would be quite insulting to beg others for money bec I cant fix my own problems.

        2. The many and the few,
          if you allow me I am willing to give you my detailed version of how you can escape poverty, starting today.

      2. “Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination?”

        I do not know where did you get that notion! There is no discrimination! You might mean “favoritism from among children” or the “degree of protection accorded” to daughters more than sons.

        Here, elder siblings’ seniority are acknowledge by younger siblings and they’re addressed accordingly as “ATE” (for big sister) and “KUYA” (for big brother) as a sign of respect.
        We respect our elders as we respect our fellowmen! We are welcoming people, Mr. Haighton!

        “we had your system and your family culture – the exact same way – till the 1960s. But daughters/women/wives started fighting that system. And they succeeded (thank god) and won. Now they are free. Women do the same things men do. Women have their own career and make their own money. And when I say career, I mean career.”

        Women here, are also free just like in the Netherlands. As a matter of fact with our Younger Republic (The United States of America granted independence to the Philippines on July 4, 1946), as compared to your all male elected prime ministers since the 25th of March 1848 up to today, we already have produced two women presidents!

        “Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.”

        Your perception is definitely not true and incorrect! If you ask around, you’ll find out that we have different and separate lives apart from the family. But we just don’t forget them! We know how to give back! Don’t be overwhelmed by the sentiments of some of the people here!

        Our view of the world is different from that of “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs” where the focus is SELF-CENTERED, more on the SELF! In contrast, whereas, “self-actualization” of individuals, in the extended 8-stage model (of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs) is achieved on the 7th and th 8th stage, we filipinos at a tender age are taught by our parents and teachers to give and share to our less fortunate fellows right from the very start!

        http://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

        “Pls show me you dont need foreign aid and then we will talk again.”

        THE Filipino Nation will always be Grateful and Thankful to those who extend us help! That is why we also do the same for others in whatever way we can.

        1. “Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination?”

          I do not know where did you get that notion! There is no discrimination! You might mean “favoritism from among children” or the “degree of protection accorded” to daughters more than sons.

          Here, elder siblings’ seniority are acknowledge by younger siblings and they’re addressed accordingly as “ATE” (for big sister) and “KUYA” (for big brother) as a sign of respect. We respect our elders as we respect our fellowmen! We are welcoming people, Mr. Haighton!

          In that declaration of Delikadesa reference is made to only the female gender. Furthermore, every time when I am at a Philippine beach, I see girls/women completely dressed (shorts, shirt, panty & bra) while guys wear swimming trunks (Maria Clara image?). Most (but more likely all) OFWs that work as house maid are female. Probably they are pushed by their parents for those simple talents. While I am sure they have other and better talents.
          I know about the Ate and Kuya. But seniority means nothing here if one didn’t achieve anything in his/her life. We have a different definition of respect. The older sister/brother can be more stupid, have a lower IQ than a younger sibling. But even then the younger sibling treat the older in a polite normal and equal way. In other words: we treat each other equally. There is no difference between an older sibling and a younger sibling (thank god).
          It’s a matter of chance (or bad luck) that I was born last. That doesn’t constitute that I have to show (more) respect to my older and oldest sisters. It is not granted that older people are wiser or better or more knowledgeable per se than younger people. My oldest sister is my equal in all aspects, whether her income is lower, her IQ is lower and/or whether she is unemployed.
          We just address each other by our first names. It really looks ridiculous to address my sister by yelling “Ate Yolanda” or just simply “ate”.
          You want to be really respected in my country? Then make a name for yourself, achieve something nobody expected you had in you. Then people will talk highly about you.

          “we had your system and your family culture – the exact same way – till the 1960s. But daughters/women/wives started fighting that system. And they succeeded (thank god) and won. Now they are free. Women do the same things men do. Women have their own career and make their own money. And when I say career, I mean career.”

          Women here, are also free just like in the Netherlands. As a matter of fact with our Younger Republic (The United States of America granted independence to the Philippines on July 4, 1946), as compared to your all male elected prime ministers since the 25th of March 1848 up to today, we already have produced two women presidents!

          I cant deny that. It is a fact. But I actually don’t care who is king, queen, president or prime minister as long as he/she is good. So if the next Dutch prime minister is a black woman, being a lesbian, having 2 adopted young kids, in a wheel chair then I am okay about that as long as she was/is the best candidate.

          “Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.”

          Your perception is definitely not true and incorrect! If you ask around, you’ll find out that we have different and separate lives apart from the family. But we just don’t forget them! We know how to give back! Don’t be overwhelmed by the sentiments of some of the people here!

          Don’t get me wrong. We also help our family but not to such an extent as it happens in your country. My sisters frequently ask my opinion, advice or sugggestions (and vice versa) but that’s about it. My sisters can look after themselves and take care of themselves. They don’t need my money. I don’t interfere with how they raise their own kids (not my business).

          Our view of the world is different from that of “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs” where the focus is SELF-CENTERED, more on the SELF! In contrast, whereas, “self-actualization” of individuals, in the extended 8-stage model (of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs) is achieved on the 7th and th 8th stage, we filipinos at a tender age are taught by our parents and teachers to give and share to our less fortunate fellows right from the very start!

          http://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

          And this is where everything goes wrong in your country. Teachers don’t say how we must live our lives (its none of their business). Teachers teach me French, English, global History and that’s what they are paid for. Teachers are not my parents. Parents tell us they want us to have a better live than they ever had by encouraging and stimulating us improving our talents and making our talents work for us. If I had to constantly be aware to help my parents and sisters then I would never be able to progress. I would be less fortunate, and I would have a far lesser interesting job. I would be living in a shithole squatting house begging for food. Such a life has nothing to do with living, that is surviving (stage 1 of Maslow). I am sure I will commit suicide and damn I would be angry at my parents for putting me in such a shit life. I rather wish they stopped procreating after they had my sisters.
          If your country would more adopt the full scope of Maslow there would be no less fortunate in your country. And then you can finally pursue YOUR goal at the expense of nobody. As a result, everything in your country will change for the better bec if it would stay the same it would and will hinder YOUR progress. The level of education will improve, the government will stop being corrupt, TV programs will improve and so on and so on. But if you keep on sticking to the family culture then the quality of education will not change, the government will stay corrupt and tv programs wont change either. So the power lies within you as individual. You wanna stay poor then don’t change, you wanna move on then change your life. But I know the population wont change their behavior bec they are scared of being left behind. Fear is the driving force in your country but all you do is sugar coating it and give it another name.

          “Pls show me you dont need foreign aid and then we will talk again.”
          The Filipino nation will always be grateful and thankful to those who extend us help! That is why we also do the same for others in whatever way we can.

          If something happens here equalling Hayian then all we get are your prayers. What more can your country do? And I don’t think we need your help and prayers. We can help ourselves even in such a disaster.

    3. Just like every Filipino I’ve ever met, TMATF, you’re quick to blame every problem on everybody except yourselves.

      You are living in a complete fantasy world if you think the Filipino concept of “family” encompasses the meaning of “community”. I’ve seen communities which are so busy arguing between themselves – pathetic feuds that have been going on for years – that they don’t realise how much wealth they could produce if they would just shake hands, settle their differences, and get down to work.

      1) Filipinos are pathologically unable to co-operate with ANYBODY. Virtually every family has an OFW providing money so that the rest of the family can sit on their ass and do nothing.

      Contrast that with – say – Indians, who (if given the chance) will all get jobs, pool their resources, and buy property for each family member in turn.

      2) “The Few” do not hold the resources. The poor do. That’s why the entire country is poor: most of the land – from which all wealth flows – is held by people who don’t have the will or the education to do anything with it. You have literally lost half your country before you’ve even started.

      As for having no education, oppressed, etc etc etc: we see it. We see it perhaps more clearly than you do. You volunteer for oppression, by voting for criminals and listening to the Pinoy Pride nonsense in school. Can’t read or write? Don’t know how to farm? Educate YOURSELF. Don’t wait for the government to come and do it for you. You know the government doesn’t care. Why should you expect them to help you?

      Get real, Philippines. The only people who can help the poor are the poor themselves. They have it within their power. But they prefer to be exploited.

      1. “Just like every Filipino I’ve ever met, TMATF, you’re quick to blame every problem on everybody except yourselves.”

        Isn’t it ironic, that after saying what you’ve stated above, you started blaming and generalizing everyone else!

        Your words:

        -“You are living in a complete fantasy world if you think the Filipino concept of “family” encompasses the meaning of “community”.”

        -“Filipinos are pathologically unable to co-operate with ANYBODY.”

        -“That’s why the entire country is poor: most of the land – from which all wealth flows – is held by people who don’t have the will or the education to do anything with it.”

        -“You volunteer for oppression, by voting for criminals and listening to the Pinoy Pride nonsense in school.”

        -“But they prefer to be exploited.”

        The views of these statements are all in the NEGATIVE, maybe next time you can try a POSITIVE version for a change and let’s see what’s what!

        I don’t know what Nationality you have, but just like all the Rah-Rah Boys! of GRP Commenters prevalent in this site, you are entitled to your opinion! “IT’S THEM NOT US ATTITUDE” is still the Weapon of Choice!

        1. Well that’s the problem with dumb flips like you: puro ka pinoy prayd nang pinoy prayd and yet look at you always sugarcoat any negatives with anything “positive” because you are too coward to face the former and to make yourself feel better. That is such a stupid way to fix our country’s problems you coward because even if you sugarcoat it with any -illoions of times, you can’t escape them and they will haunt you forever.

        2. >> Isn’t it ironic, that after saying what you’ve stated above, you started blaming and generalizing everyone else!

          I’m not blaming “everybody else”. I’m specifically blaming:

          1) People who vote for corrupt, lazy and criminal public officials … over and over again
          2) People who hold onto agricultural land grants and do nothing with it.
          3) People who send their sons and daughters abroad to be OFWs so they can leech off them and brag about ‘family values’.

          Those people, specifically. And there are a LOT of them.

          >> The views of these statements are all in the NEGATIVE, maybe next time you can try a POSITIVE version for a change and let’s see what’s what!

          So let’s get this right, TMATF. You don’t want foreigners pointing out what’s wrong. You just want them to tell you how to fix it?

          Fair enough. Here’s the positive version. The power to change society is in YOUR OWN hands. Why? Because you – the little people – are the cause.

          You do not have to wait for the politicians to fix it for you. Here’s the solution:

          1) Change yourselves. Stop lying, cheating, and leaving it to God to fix.
          2) Stop abusing family generosity.
          3) Behave like the Christians you proclaim yourself to be. Start with the ten commandments: stealing; idolatry; adultery; covetousness; and all the rest.
          4) If you have a farm, get off your lazy ass and develop it. There are lots of educated people going back to the family farm and making it a big sucess. There are magazines and websites (written by Filipinos) full of their ideas. It’s up to the ‘poor’ people to pay attention.

          As for nationality: do you know what REALLY annoys me in the Philippines? The general idea that all foreigners have a money tree growing in their yard. I work hard for my money. I spent a long time gaining qualifications and experience. And I deliver big profits to my employer. But people in my home country who are lazy and stupid are as poor as Filipinos. Because they choose to be.

        3. And incidentally, TMATF, many people in my home country DREAM of having a farm. They would count themselves the luckiest in the world to have one. Some people save and work for years to realise their dream and buy a farm.

          The Filipino, who is given land for free, just sits there moaning about how the government doesn’t do anything for him.

          That’s not just pathetic and sad. It’s treason. Those people are deliberately holding back the country’s development.

  9. The Republic of The Philippines is FUCKED, Get out now !!! By any means possible and never return !!! or at least do not return until a citizen of another country.

      1. I do, ALL THE TIME, and I hang on the beach till I need to do something else, then I do it ! but you are stuck there and I feel bad for Filipino’s.I DO ,and I buy them some things ! but then Horse’s ass’s like you come around, and say what you just said, and my attitude changes.and I find myself remembering bad things that have happened to me there and why I walk around with a .9MM and a German Shepherd attack dog.YEAH, coz of ASSHATS like you !

  10. what POSITIVE things do you suggest? since you think it is all NEGATIVE in here, offer us something else..and BTW your “bayanihan” is dead and buried..now, it’s every man to himself…and if you haven’t noticed, best to remove those blinders you are wearing

  11. It is NOT all negative here! (Ilda and BenignO, as well as some other GRP writers writes Intelligently!) The negative reply was just a reaction to an ironic assertion! “Its Them Not Us” attitude!

    Now this is what you call Negative!

    “…your “bayanihan” is dead and buried..now, it’s every man to himself…and if you haven’t noticed, best to remove those blinders you are wearing”

    I am NOT Blind, you’re Not just deep and heavy enough into the Filipino Culture!

    The Philippines as a whole is more than GRP, more than Noynoy Aquino, more than Manny Pacquiao, more than all the rah-rah boys of GRP who are joining the bandwagon!

    “what POSITIVE things do you suggest?”

    A change in attitude is a positive thing! Think Filipino! Be a Filipino if you are one!

    1. pray tell what is a Filipino? is he the one who sells his vote to the highest bidder? is he the one who throws garbage wherever he wants? is he the one who enriches himself with other peoples money? is he the one who is proud to be pinoy because of the achievement of certain individuals with Filipino blood? is he the one who idolizes celebrities and treat them like gods? is he the one who gets paid by the government for doing nothing and then when things goes to hell, blame the same government that fees him? is he the one who cries foul that he is being driven away from a land that he does not own and cries about his rights?…i could go on and on but please tell me, who is a Filipino?

      a change in attitude? sheez! how can i when i am surrounded by people who are happy in the pile of shit they are in and will never listen to reason because they are “already happy” and “why rock the boat” or “it’s not happening to me so why would i bother” or “who gives a shit as long as I eat 3 meals a day, have a roof over my head, clothes and my teleseryes” and so on..again show me something that would change my NEGATIVE attitude

  12. For Mr. Robert Haighton!

    1.
    “After spending 6 years (from 2009) in your country, I think I know how your system of “family-culture” works.”

    The Family is a support system. Obligation to the family is not mandatory/compulsory but rather more of voluntary! It is NOT forced or compelled! Cooperation among family members is totally a different thing from what you called Dependency! Or if you may “Emotional Blackmail”! It is Not Slavery and it’s Not just limited to a clan! We are also Global People you know! I hope I am not lost in translation!

    2.
    “If everybody is responsible for him/herself and doesnt make mistakes anymore, we dont need each other’s support and help.”

    “Last question to you:
    I have a gift (god given or genes?) and I found a job with those gifts/talents. It pays me enough money. Pls tell me why I should share my wealth with others? I work for it, let others work with their talents.”

    It’s different strokes for different folks!

    And to your questions, the answer to that is because you can make a difference if you do, Mr. Haighton! Here’s why! I invite you to check out the “I-Witness” documentary “Kubling Yaman ng Cama Juan Ang Pagtatapos” so you may know as a Foreigner in this country, that there is more of the Filipino outside of the confines of GRP!

    I Witness April 18, 2015 “Kubling Yaman ng Cama Juan Ang Pagtatapos”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoGvFNBnnBE

    http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/473566/publicaffairs/iwitness/field-of-dreams-the-scholars-of-cama-juan

    https://www.facebook.com/notes/gma-public-affairs/i-witness-kubling-yaman-ng-cama-juan-dokumentaryo-ni-sandra-aguinaldo/10150195964662026

    3.
    if you allow me I am willing to give you my detailed version of how you can escape poverty, starting today.

    I am an excited pupil Mr. Haighton! Make our Day!

  13. Cct realy helps some very poor filipinos, the problem is the majority of those receiving it have too many children, i know it personally bcause my mother is a public elem. teacher and most of the cct recepients from her school come from a big family and very poor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.