Temporary Solutions for Long-Term Problems: The Pinoy’s Most Common Response

My heart goes out to all those who helped Mary Jane Veloso escape her predicament. From those who prayed for her (I’m one of those who believe that prayer does indeed hold some power), those who pleaded for her case to those who chose to spare her from execution, you have my sincerest gratitude. But while her continued survival is indeed something to be thankful for, I would like to mention the fact that all we’ve really bought the poor woman is time. Who’s to say that the case won’t be investigated further until those in Indonesia choose to execute her anyway? Also, what of the many other OFW’s out there in the world who are facing the threat of death from being in death row, to being in the way of a national disaster to those in countries under the threat of war?

Indeed, I believe in the Jewish saying that “one life saved saves the world entire” but the problem here is all about how we, as a people, have failed to see the bigger picture and the greater threats that loom over our nation. While the spared life of Mary Jane Veloso is indeed good news, I think that it is simply too early for us to be celebrating.

long_term_futureOver the years, as I’ve come to realize, the solutions our society offers are at best only temporary and, at worst, merely a means of “sweeping things under the rug” rather than a permanent and progressive answer to our problems. The issue about Mary Jane Veloso is just one of these many problems that we aren’t facing the way we should. Remember, Mary Jane Veloso’s case could resume at any time and go through with her execution anyway and that we still have plenty of countrymen out there who are in death row right now as we speak.

Here are some of the things I’d like to point out to you:

The “Peace Agreement” with the MILF

Okay, I know this is getting old but I think it’s all the more reason that we start taking this seriously. As I’ve mentioned before, what the MILF is proposing isn’t even a “negotiation”, it’s essentially a “surrender”. Suppose we give in to their demands (like what the president is doing), would it really bring peace in Mindanao once and for all?

Here’s the problem, the MILF does not represent all the Muslims who live in Mindanao. Were we to give a peace of Mindanao to the MILF, other groups will become jealous and will probably clamor for their own territory in Mindanao. Like the hydra of Greek mythology, cutting off just one head will cause two or three more to sprout from the severed stump of its neck. Also of note, will the MILF really stop with just the BBL or will they eventually go on to ask for more territory and greater autonomy.

President Aquino’s statement about approving the BBL or counting body bags best counts as something similar to putting a ban-aid to a skull fracture. At the end of the day, it’s more or less delaying the inevitable. Sooner or later, the MILF or other groups will get it in their heads to seize even more territory and one can only imagine how our government and our society will react then.

The CCT

“Catch a fish for a man and you feed him fish for one day. Teach a man to catch a fish and you feed him fish for the rest of his life.” The saying goes something like that anyway. I’m not really sure.

But the point is, by letting someone make a good living for themselves, they gain the opportunity to have a prosperous life and a promising future for their families. However, if you just give them money, nothing will stop them from spending all that money on trivial stuff like gambling, drinks or other vices all in one day which will subsequently drive them to bankruptcy again.

While giving money to the poor is a good thing and can allow one to better oneself, it is not a guarantee for progress. Instead, it all depends on the person spending the money. Unfortunately, based on the number of “one-week millionaires” (lottery winners who lose all their winnings because of overspending in just the course of a week) we keep hearing about, you can see just how “wise” Pinoys are when it comes to money.

Now, from my own opinion, giving people the opportunity to earn their own sizeable keep might be a different story. With that in mind, they’ll be able to make their own money by working and prevent them from relying too much on dole-outs. In the end, it becomes a win-win situation because you get a productive worker (or at least an average worker, at that) and you’re able to give someone the opportunity to feed his or her family on a regular basis.

The Case with OFWs

Okay, going back to my sentiments in the first paragraphs of this article…

The fact that Mary Jane Veloso was spared was a “win” on our part. However, I regret to say that what’s been done is at best a “delaying tactic” much like the first two examples mentioned above. There is still a chance that the Indonesian government will find more reasons to have Mary Jane Veloso executed. Worse yet, and I cannot emphasize it enough, there are still other OFWs out there who may be in danger or worse.

Like the second point mentioned above, I think we should find a means to provide more opportunities for our countrymen instead of keeping the potentially dangerous system we have now. Why force them to travel overseas to make ends meet for their families when we can provide business opportunities and promising careers for them here in the Philippines. By keeping the oligarch-centered system we have, we are essentially just making the rich richer and the poor poorer and needlessly endangering the lives of productive Filipino citizens.

Let’s push to have more job opportunities with fair deals here in the Philippines instead of forcing our countrymen to risk themselves in potentially dangerous settings outside the country…

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Post Author: Grimwald

I came that you may know PAIN and have it in abundance…

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74 Comments on "Temporary Solutions for Long-Term Problems: The Pinoy’s Most Common Response"

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Robert Haighton
Member
Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot? Dont get me wrong, I am firmly against the death penalty. But wasnt she who carried the drugs? Secondly: “But the point is, by letting someone make a good living for themselves, they gain the opportunity to have a prosperous life and…” this is sheer impossible when a person (lets say a daughter) have to pay money (take care and support) to her own parents. This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty. This is… Read more »
marius
Guest
MJV either knew what was going on, or she was a complete idiot. Airlines warn people over and over again not to carry stuff for others. If you know you’re going to a third-world shithole with dubious or draconian laws, you’re doubly careful. But, of course, Filipinos think the rules don’t apply to them, do they? I completely agree that ‘family-culture’ is the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. But let’s call it what it is (freeloading and slavery) rather than dignifying it with the word ‘culture’. Still, I think it goes without saying that the government and the church… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Marius, I actually dont blame MJV that much. She was a victim of ignorance and naivity and she paid a huge prize for that. I read that the recruiter promised her a job and easy money and that she (MJV) comes from a poor background. A typical ABC and 1, 2, 3 if you ask me (for the recruiter). She (MJV) was an easy victim. Sorry Marius, but for me its really culture. A culture of being family focused,family oriented and family centered (and you can add to that god-focused, god-oriented and god-centered). Its widespreak and a national disaster/plaque. Many… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Thaddeus, not sure what you wanna know. But if you dont believe me pls do your own research. We do have corruption here (everybody knows that) done by politicians. In most cases on provincial or city level. But they are brought to justice. (here is an example: http://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2015/04/02/vvd-beeindigt-lidmaatschap-van-rey/). Our current prime minister – Mark Rutte – is like your president not married (http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Rutte). Mark is very close – politically – with David Cameron (England). They both share the same age – more or less. But the corruption is not widespread in my country. Its more an exception than a rule.… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

To add, bec I dont know what your president’s salary is:
Mark Rutte’s annual salary is Euro 178,000. This equals approx PHP 8 million.

Robert Haighton
Member
“…support the rest of my clan somehow.” I call that emotional and psychological blackmail. And I loathe the word “clan”. It always makes me think of maffia practises. If you are really free (without any burden) you work for yourself. You find a partner who also has a full time job and then the 2 of you will have quite a prosperous life. Go and have a career, make money, and spend it wisely. Does that sound selfish to you? Then pls stake care of your “clan” and stay poor. But in that case: dont cry me a river. And… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Thaddeus, “As a Dutchman looking at a bunch of dumb Pinoys,…” I am not looking down on pinays. But the solution to get out of poverty is around the corner, in front of their noses. But they are too afraid to change their family culture. And this fear helps the government, it helps the church. The solution lies within the family. But probably that is a taboo to talk about by GRP writers. It seems also for the GRP writers that the family is a sacred, not to be touched issue. Instead they (the GRP writers) want the government to… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Becoming a politician in my country doesnt require a special form of education or course. You graduated in Economics from a university is enough.

As long as you understand that the Philippine society is who you work for as politician then you could have done it. If you only do it for your own ego, for the status then you will probably become as corrupt as all PH politicians.

Robert Haighton
Member

Yes indeed as politician you can do much more than writing and bashing and blaming the government. Change has to come from within. From within the government and from within the family.

But if you see all your fellow politicians being corrupt and taking bribes then what will you do?

Yawn
Guest

Robert, the origin of the word clan is Scottish Gaelic and dates back to the 15th century. Clann meaning offspring.

Scottish families are called clans

Robert Haighton
Member

Thanks Yawn,
I should have known, but I didnt.

Sick Amore
Guest

“Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot?”

The Indonesian government needed to answer this otherwise other countries will think the Philippines is given special treatment. Country leaders of those scheduled to be executed all make an appeal and was rejected except PNoy. What’s the catch?

OnesimusUnbound
Guest

Personally, I wanna be convinced beyond reasonable doubt if she’s fully aware of what she’s doing (hence should be execute as per Indonesian law) or was simply duped person, forced to find work elsewhere due extreme hardship in the Philippines.

Robert Haighton
Member

She (MJV) was an easy target for the recruiter(s). The recruiters lost the drugs and MJV became collateral damage.
Being ignorant and naive is not a crime. But boy oh boy I hope she learned her lessons (if she gets out of this).

For Indonesian law it is not important whether a person is/was aware of what one is doing. She broke the law. I even think a Brazilian was autistic and he got executed.

MJV was 30 years old, right? She should have known better. She wasnt a 12 year old child anymore.

Lil
Guest

“Can someone pls explain me why the Filipina case differs from all those other people who were shot?”

That sounds like a question the Indonesia govt are now expecting the PH govt/judiciary to answer. If they don’t get a favorable response, then I’m afraid Grimwald is right. All we did is just buy her some time.

Dave
Guest

Robert, you may see things like the family-oriented culture as a problem, and I may happen to agree with you, but you have to understand that is how they like it to be – damaging or not.

Imposing your views on what Filipinos need to change, even with good intentions, is no different to Christian missionaries trying to save people’s souls.

Robert Haighton
Member
Dave, I was and am afraid of that, every time I comment here (being labeled as the Christian missionary). BUT I, personally, dont gain and dont benefit from a possible change in family-culture (is there any money in it for me? Where? How?). All I want(ed) to share is, that I think I know how people can change their future step by step. And that change wont come from the government and wont come from the RC church. All I know is that that is the source of the the problems Filipinos are facing. And thats why, I dont understand… Read more »
Ilda
Admin

All I know is that that is the source of the the problems Filipinos are facing. And thats why, I dont understand why all or most GRP writers keep on bashing the government.

What the…? We will write about whatever the hell we feel like writing about. If you don’t like it, then go somewhere else.

Robert Haighton
Member

I dont care what you write about. I only dont see any change.

Ilda
Admin

And why do you blame the writers of GRP? We can’t control the behaviour of the majority. We can only write about it.

Robert Haighton
Member
Ilda, pls for god’s sake, I am not blaming you and your co-writers. I only think (or arrogantly said: I know) that the people you address (the government) dont give a shit (Pardon me my French). The government – unfortunately – is there to use and abuse the population and the government is sitting there for their own ego. Now and then the government will give something to the people (RH law) to keep them quiet again. The key or the power is in the hand of the individual. And if each individual can find their equal friend to start… Read more »
Ilda
Admin

Quit expecting too much from the writers here. We will write whatever we want to write about. If I want to focus on exposing the stupidity of the culture through the actions of the voters and the elected officials, I will do so even without your permission.

Now, I suggest you create your own blogsite and write your own articles to satisfy your need.

Robert Haighton
Member

That would be very arrogant from me to think you need my permission.

Apart from that I wish you all the best with achieving your goals with your writings. I hope we will see each other in heaven in about 200 years from now and will see then what the results were. Probably changed not much.

Ilda
Admin

Yeah, so what if you think we’re just wasting our time? Then you are even worse because you are wasting your time on people YOU THINK are just wasting their time.

Robert Haighton
Member
Dear Mr./Sir Grimwald, I sincerely do think that GRP and I (independently from each other) have the same goal and objective for the Philippines. But I think the road GRP is driving on towards their goal and objective is not the fastest road (I will not say the wrong road). And only there, on that fact, we (GRP and I) seem to differ. I know that Ilda (and probably you and other GRP writers) doesnt care what I think, but I do think that the government will never give an inch and “come down” to the people. The politicans do… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Dave, For many years, I have been busy/trying to find answers to why the Filipinos live the way they live. Its probably not fair to compare one country with another country but I am just interested and curious what makes people tick. So far, I havent experienced any form of corruption while being in the Philippines (except maybe that strange airport terminal fee one has to pay). We, the dutch didnt get rich over night. That was a fight and struggle taking many years. And that fight was fought “bottoms-up” and not “top-down”. What I see, every time when I… Read more »
BING BONG
Guest
@ Robert, OOPS, you done did it, insulted the frail ego of the Filipino, tsk tsk !!! I see that you are only out for their own good fortune and somehow they take it the wrong way. Filipino’s are way too easily insulted, they are like the Black people in the states. BUT the real ghetto blacks in the states though are the ones that have nothing but their pride and take insults as an excuse to kill people.So ,Filipino’s are a step up from them but still, if they could get over themselves and have the nerve to all… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Bing Bong, My comment (criticism) is NOT to insult and/or to offend and/or to embarrass. I had many conversations with my former Filipina girlfriend about probably all aspects of the Philippine culture. I only told her that what I observed didnt and doesnt lead to anything good/positive/better. Probably they and she see/saw me as a foreigner who barges in their country telling them what they are doing wrong. Nobody likes that at first. But hey, I also do get comments and crticism from my own family members, friends and even collegues. Are they all wrong? No, they are not. So… Read more »
BING BONG
Guest

@ Robert, I dont understand it either. It was also obvious that what you stated was not meant to be an insult. Insults are words that are meaningless 90+% of the time, the rest is slander and can be dealt with legally, or illegally.

Sick Amore
Guest

As to this

The “Peace Agreement” with the MILF

I just came across this after exploring GRP:
“peace initiatives tend to separate Muslims from Christians which eventually add to the tension there. He suggests that any peace agreement should benefit all those affected, not just one group or the other.” http://leadphil.blogspot.com/2010/12/snk-with-we-care.html

Irineo B. R. Salazar
Guest
Well, this short-termism can not only be found among Filipinos but also among members of the working (and non-working) class in Europe. People who are used to having no future learn to think only of the present. Dr. Phil Zimbardo writes about this in one of his books, writing that cultures with more future-orientation are more successful but have less fun than those who only live in the present. Possibly the reasons are to be found in the colonial experience, but also in the fact that the Philippines used to live in conditions of tropical abundance – but now of… Read more »
092Toro0055Hayden
Guest

Miss Velosa’s execution is just delayed. Sooner or late, she will face the Firing Squad.

We don’t have good paying jobs in the Philippines. We have university graduates, working in call centers.

So, people have to go overseas, to seek employment. We remit money (I’m an OFW); and the Oligarchs control the Banking system. They profit immensely on this financial set up.

The Philippine economy would sink; without the OFW remittances. This is the “Daan Matuwid” of Aquino; going straight to his pocket…

marius
Guest
Haven’t you noticed the contradiction in your statement? 1) The Philippine economy would sink without the OFW remittances. 2) So, people have to go overseas, to seek employment. We remit money (I’m an OFW). You don’t have to go abroad. Quite the opposite. STOP going abroad and create local economies independent of the banking system. The flow of dollars will stop and the oligarchs will fall. Not going to happen, is it? The last thing the Filipino wants to do is (a) defy the parents orders to send back cash and (b) co-operate with people who aren’t part of the… Read more »
Chris
Guest

“I’m one of those who believe that prayer does indeed hold some power”

Sorry Grimwald, but after several years of following your well-informed posts you have just lost all credibility with me. Please come back down from whatever planet you are on.

Pilosopo Socrates
Guest

@ 092Toro0055Hayden :
“We don’t have good paying jobs in the Philippines. We have university graduates, working in call centers. ” I am a statistic.
sadly.

@Grimwald: Been following since your 1st post, i love the topic but i was dissappointed.

dont get me wrong, the idea of temporary solutions to long term problems is a good one though can you also apply to almost everythimg else that is wrong with the country? Also why do most of the leaders never seem to think of long term consequences?

Do all of them follow the KKK rule???

11Hayden0066Toro
Guest

@Pilosopo Socrates:

I am very lucky to get out of the Philippines; after I graduated from College. Otherwise, I would have been one of the Statistics, working in a Call Center.

Now, I am earning a decent pay, as an OFW, with a career that is in line with my College degree…

Pilosopo Socrates
Guest

@11Hayden0066Toro I still respect your POV.

I wish I could get out as well, i have relatives in the States/ Canada but the very idea of leaving is still look down upon as being a traitor to your country in my social circle.

The bright side I could say is that I am not part of the unemployed and trying to secure as part of the intelligent and aware upper class. (I am not part of any dynasty BTW).

Ricardo_Diaz
Guest

The primary reason why nothing gets ever done in the Philippines is because they consider straight up truth and honesty to be “disrespectful” and thus attack the messenger and never bother to listen to the message.

Many temporary solutions are partly made with the intention of not offending anyone. Thus we have the wreck of a country we see today.

Vincent
Guest
I have one experience similar to the title of this post. A couple of years ago, the establishment beside our apartment were demolishing their 10ft+ hollow block fence, the fence being shared by them and our compound. Small pieces of concrete were falling towards our area but being a Filipino, we ignored it despite safety issue. Makisama ka na lang ika nga. But what is not forgiving is when they left the top 5ft+ portion of the wall hanging. One day, after a couple of hours that they left the job site, (when I concluded that they must have stopped… Read more »
marius
Guest
Filipinos love pieces of paper. The country is awash with pointless forms and procedures. I used to think that Filipino politicians had simply misunderstood how functioning governments use paper and procedures – to create and to record action – and had just mindlessly copied the superficialities. I’ve now realised they’re not that stupid. The purpose of the paper-shuffling is precisely to HIDE the fact that they’re not doing anything useful, and don’t intend to. You’ll waste all your time and money filling in forms and following the procedures, until you’re eventually exhausted and will leave the bureaucrats alone to do… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest
The so-called ‘family-culture’ is NOT the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. It is NEITHER “freeloading” NOR “slavery”! I beg to differ with the concept of ‘family-culture’ which Mr. Robert Haighton and Marius espouses! In their own words: Robert Haighton says: “This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty.” “A culture of being family focused,family oriented and family centered (and you can add to that god-focused, god-oriented and god-centered). Its widespreak and a national disaster/plaque.” marius says: “I completely agree that ‘family-culture’ is the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. But let’s call… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
@The many and the few, re: your BTW here is a text that I copied many years ago from a Filipina’s page regarding her “definition” of Delikadesa. “Delikadesa Many western men choose to build a relationship with a Filipina girl. Some even choose to marry a Filipina. But what makes Filipino women so wanted? 1. Filipina girls are renowned for their beauty. They surely stand out among Asian women in terms of charm and femininity. If you think other way you probably have never seen Angela Perez Baraquio the first Asian American and Filipino American who was crowned Miss America… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest
I think you got it wrong! Sorry, English is not my primary language! But here below is what we are talking about: 1. Robert Haighton says: “This family-culture is really the cause/problem why the Philippines will never get out of poverty.” The Many And The Few says: The so-called ‘family-culture’ is NOT the root cause of the Philippines’ poverty. It is NEITHER “freeloading” NOR “slavery”! Here, we have the spirit of “Bayanihan” (which is, in a way, is a “family-culture”! of cooperation!), which refers to a spirit of communal unity or effort to achieve a particular objective. I cite examples:… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Let me try to stay polite and decent myself for once. After spending 6 years (from 2009) in your country, I think I know how your system of “family-culture” works. All I tried pointing out is that the Philippines can become a bigger (not by population) and richer/wealthier country with a much better giovernment, with a much better education than now. With your system, the government wont change to becoming friendlier and more social and democratic to the people. With your system, the church wont change to becoming firendlier and more social to the people. With your system, the TV… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest

“Probably a true Delikadesa woman doesnt know/feel anger, anxiety, being pissed off. In short, I read the manufactory text of the manual of a man made robot here and not a real warm blooded human being.”

Mr. Haighton, “DELICADEZA” is NOT the Filipina (NOT the “..real warm blooded human being.”). Delicadeza is a Filipino trait practised or observed by a Cultured Individual, be it a man or woman or child!

Robert Haighton
Member
Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination? Sir The many and the few, we had your system and your family culture – the exact same way – till the 1960s. But daughters/women/wives started fighting that system. And they succeeded (thank god) and won. Now they are free. Women do the same things men do. Women have their own career and make their own money. And when I say career, I mean career. And yes it means that within one family there are winners and losers. So what? Success is a choice and you can… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest

“Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.”

On the contrary, what we have is the concept of cooperation for the benefit of the many!

In contrast to the Wall of China, which was built through years of forced labor and slavery, the Banaue Rice Terraces in Mountain Province was built through “Bayanihan”!

Robert Haighton
Member
“Your system makes everybody dependent and hence no need to be self responsible bec everything will be fixed by others.” On the contrary, what we have is the concept of cooperation for the benefit of the many! In contrast to the Wall of China, which was built through years of forced labor and slavery, the Banaue Rice Terraces in Mountain Province was built through “Bayanihan”! If everybody is responsible for him/herself and doesnt make mistakes anymore, we dont need each other’s support and help. We can fix our own problems. I dont need your money anymore for putting my son… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

The many and the few,
if you allow me I am willing to give you my detailed version of how you can escape poverty, starting today.

The Many And The Few
Guest
“Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination?” I do not know where did you get that notion! There is no discrimination! You might mean “favoritism from among children” or the “degree of protection accorded” to daughters more than sons. Here, elder siblings’ seniority are acknowledge by younger siblings and they’re addressed accordingly as “ATE” (for big sister) and “KUYA” (for big brother) as a sign of respect. We respect our elders as we respect our fellowmen! We are welcoming people, Mr. Haighton! “we had your system and your family culture – the exact same… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
“Pls explain me why daughters are raised differently then sons? Why the discrimination?” I do not know where did you get that notion! There is no discrimination! You might mean “favoritism from among children” or the “degree of protection accorded” to daughters more than sons. Here, elder siblings’ seniority are acknowledge by younger siblings and they’re addressed accordingly as “ATE” (for big sister) and “KUYA” (for big brother) as a sign of respect. We respect our elders as we respect our fellowmen! We are welcoming people, Mr. Haighton! In that declaration of Delikadesa reference is made to only the female… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

TMATF,
something completely different now:
What is the workforce/labor force in the Philippines and how many jobs are available in the Philippines?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Workforce.

marius
Guest
Just like every Filipino I’ve ever met, TMATF, you’re quick to blame every problem on everybody except yourselves. You are living in a complete fantasy world if you think the Filipino concept of “family” encompasses the meaning of “community”. I’ve seen communities which are so busy arguing between themselves – pathetic feuds that have been going on for years – that they don’t realise how much wealth they could produce if they would just shake hands, settle their differences, and get down to work. 1) Filipinos are pathologically unable to co-operate with ANYBODY. Virtually every family has an OFW providing… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest
“Just like every Filipino I’ve ever met, TMATF, you’re quick to blame every problem on everybody except yourselves.” Isn’t it ironic, that after saying what you’ve stated above, you started blaming and generalizing everyone else! Your words: -“You are living in a complete fantasy world if you think the Filipino concept of “family” encompasses the meaning of “community”.” -“Filipinos are pathologically unable to co-operate with ANYBODY.” -“That’s why the entire country is poor: most of the land – from which all wealth flows – is held by people who don’t have the will or the education to do anything with… Read more »
domo
Guest

Well that’s the problem with dumb flips like you: puro ka pinoy prayd nang pinoy prayd and yet look at you always sugarcoat any negatives with anything “positive” because you are too coward to face the former and to make yourself feel better. That is such a stupid way to fix our country’s problems you coward because even if you sugarcoat it with any -illoions of times, you can’t escape them and they will haunt you forever.

marius
Guest
>> Isn’t it ironic, that after saying what you’ve stated above, you started blaming and generalizing everyone else! I’m not blaming “everybody else”. I’m specifically blaming: 1) People who vote for corrupt, lazy and criminal public officials … over and over again 2) People who hold onto agricultural land grants and do nothing with it. 3) People who send their sons and daughters abroad to be OFWs so they can leech off them and brag about ‘family values’. Those people, specifically. And there are a LOT of them. >> The views of these statements are all in the NEGATIVE, maybe… Read more »
marius
Guest

And incidentally, TMATF, many people in my home country DREAM of having a farm. They would count themselves the luckiest in the world to have one. Some people save and work for years to realise their dream and buy a farm.

The Filipino, who is given land for free, just sits there moaning about how the government doesn’t do anything for him.

That’s not just pathetic and sad. It’s treason. Those people are deliberately holding back the country’s development.

BING BONG
Guest

The Republic of The Philippines is FUCKED, Get out now !!! By any means possible and never return !!! or at least do not return until a citizen of another country.

Tumbong
Guest

If you are a citizen of this country and if you believe so, then by all means, leave!

BING BONG
Guest

I do, ALL THE TIME, and I hang on the beach till I need to do something else, then I do it ! but you are stuck there and I feel bad for Filipino’s.I DO ,and I buy them some things ! but then Horse’s ass’s like you come around, and say what you just said, and my attitude changes.and I find myself remembering bad things that have happened to me there and why I walk around with a .9MM and a German Shepherd attack dog.YEAH, coz of ASSHATS like you !

nagtatanong_lang
Guest

what POSITIVE things do you suggest? since you think it is all NEGATIVE in here, offer us something else..and BTW your “bayanihan” is dead and buried..now, it’s every man to himself…and if you haven’t noticed, best to remove those blinders you are wearing

The Many And The Few
Guest
It is NOT all negative here! (Ilda and BenignO, as well as some other GRP writers writes Intelligently!) The negative reply was just a reaction to an ironic assertion! “Its Them Not Us” attitude! Now this is what you call Negative! “…your “bayanihan” is dead and buried..now, it’s every man to himself…and if you haven’t noticed, best to remove those blinders you are wearing” I am NOT Blind, you’re Not just deep and heavy enough into the Filipino Culture! The Philippines as a whole is more than GRP, more than Noynoy Aquino, more than Manny Pacquiao, more than all the… Read more »
nagtatanong_lang
Guest
pray tell what is a Filipino? is he the one who sells his vote to the highest bidder? is he the one who throws garbage wherever he wants? is he the one who enriches himself with other peoples money? is he the one who is proud to be pinoy because of the achievement of certain individuals with Filipino blood? is he the one who idolizes celebrities and treat them like gods? is he the one who gets paid by the government for doing nothing and then when things goes to hell, blame the same government that fees him? is he… Read more »
The Many And The Few
Guest
For Mr. Robert Haighton! 1. “After spending 6 years (from 2009) in your country, I think I know how your system of “family-culture” works.” The Family is a support system. Obligation to the family is not mandatory/compulsory but rather more of voluntary! It is NOT forced or compelled! Cooperation among family members is totally a different thing from what you called Dependency! Or if you may “Emotional Blackmail”! It is Not Slavery and it’s Not just limited to a clan! We are also Global People you know! I hope I am not lost in translation! 2. “If everybody is responsible… Read more »
d_forsaken
Guest

It’s having no foresight that makes the temporary unbearable.

detarte
Guest

Cct realy helps some very poor filipinos, the problem is the majority of those receiving it have too many children, i know it personally bcause my mother is a public elem. teacher and most of the cct recepients from her school come from a big family and very poor