Hanging onto Gilas Pilipinas (and other famous Pinoys) will not uplift the country

A slew of indignant comments raged over Gogs’ insightful article “Why A Smart Gilas Win Means Nothing To Me.” This is the same outrage fadism which flooded my own article “Why Pinoy Pride will not save the Philippines.” Instead of taking the lesson and doing better from it, or even just making some noteworthy and effective counter-arguments, some Filipinos take the article as an attack on them and they counter with insults and anger. There’s even that classic loaded question, “what have you done to help the country,” which is better asked if the asker himself can name something he did.
smartgilas

Perhaps the reason why Smart Gilas’ progress in the games is very important for many Filipinos is because the team carries the country’s name (although they also carry the name of corporate sponsor Smart). They are an official team. So their success or failure in the series is assumed to be the success or failure of the whole country, similar to those who went to the recent 2012 Olympics.

A commenter, matthew habacon said:

Para sakin these kinds of victories can serve as an inspiration for individuals to aspire for greater things. While I do not dispute na marami talagang maling nangyayari sa Pilipinas, Yung mga ganitong panalo ng isang team representing our country can make some of us want to do better.

While it is a good point, there is still a problem here. It is true that Filipinos need to aspire to do better, but the Gilas team is a basketball team. So will most Filipinos need to do better in basketball? No. You need to do better in school, do better in your work, do better in business, and more. Filipinos can get the wrong idea on “doing better.”

When we say, “do better,” we might have have forgotten other examples like Dado Banatao who founded S3 Graphics, or Katherine Luzuriaga, who helped develop a cure for the AIDS disease. Or even Yelle Castro, who decided to stay a medical professional abroad despite the promise of a singing career. We always look at sports and performing arts figures, we forget those in science, the military, the fine arts, and others who have achievements based on discipline and good behavior.

However, there seems to be another reason for Filipinos to cling on others’ successes. As fellow blogger Paul Farol tried to explain in his article, “Pinoy Pride… sometimes it’s a candle in the dark,” Filipinos try to use others’ successes to divert attention from Filipino faults. Because of the Bus Hostage Crisis and other things I mentioned in my Pinoy Pride article, Filipinos seem to have a bad reputation abroad. Thus, Filipinos try to save face.

Hiding behind the skirts of other successful Filipinos is one way of saving face. If Smart Gilas wins, Filipino fans may say “look at how great the Gilas team is! If they are great, then we are great too! So you don’t have any right to criticize us or put us down!” Unfortunately, this is only trying to make up excuses to deflect accountability and responsibility. If a Filipino abroad uses this argument so say, “you can’t fire me just because I seduced the boss’s daughter! We Filipinos are great, like Lea Salonga and Manny Pacquiao! So you should not fire me or else,” then you know the guy has a screw loose. If only there were no Filipino faults, there would truly be a reason to be proud.

And the ultimate lesson: if the Gilas team wins, it’s not because they are Pinoy. It’s because they are disciplined… which most Pinoys are not. If most Pinoys do not display this discipline, which is demonstrated in following rules and the law, being more frugal with money and being less arrogant and more accepting of criticism, as a few examples, then it has come to nothing. As Paul said, be proud to be a Filipino by being like your Filipino Idol.

And as commenter Amir Al Bahr asked in reply to Mr. habacon above:

Where are the results?

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About ChinoF

I stick with this blog because I believe, as my cohorts do, that many things Filipino embrace as part of their culture keep their society backward. And blogging freely to show that in a truly decent society, with true freedom of speech, even nobodies have a voice.

Post Author: ChinoF

I stick with this blog because I believe, as my cohorts do, that many things Filipino embrace as part of their culture keep their society backward. And blogging freely to show that in a truly decent society, with true freedom of speech, even nobodies have a voice.

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37 Comments on "Hanging onto Gilas Pilipinas (and other famous Pinoys) will not uplift the country"

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Gogs
Member

Thanks for that ChinoF. People will attack anything except the points the raised. I really don’t think basketball’s big boys were trembling in fear with this bracket. Again no other in the country in the world is as tunnel visioned in terms of basketball as us yet it has been 28 years since we are the point where we are at now. Not one heckler in the thread ever addressed that. Even Malacanang’s finest put in their two cents.

FallenAngel
Member

Filipinos consistently fail to realize that multiple achievements of individual Filipinos will never equal a grand achievement accomplished collectively. The challenge for Filipinos, then, is to unite for a vision bigger than their tribe, ethnic group, and come together to help each other out. However, it does not mean that everyone jumps onto a bandwagon, or shaming people just because hindi nakikisama, it means coming together despite their differences.

ComradeAldrich
Guest

Maybe the same tired call to collective action—a la DPRK propaganda mural—deserves some rethinking. Neither the American Founding Fathers, Enlightenment philosophers, nor the Jose Rizal who read them, would survive the suffocating rhetoric of nationalism among “Pinoys,” including many of those on the GRP’s comment section.

potaters
Guest

I think it’s fine to be happy for the team and recognize their achievements. It’s just the insufferable chest-beating way that some people do it. Tapos halata naman na ngayon lang sila nanuod. It feeds the superiority complex of some individuals.

You know what kung hindi na magbabaha dito sa Manila tapos may transit system tayo, doon lang ako magiging “proud to be Filipino.” The question is… when? Or even IF?!!

Chibi_cute
Guest

Also when a pinoy made its way through hollywood the pinoy media always broadcast it in the news as like he/she achieved a godlike status then those parasitic pinoy tv stations and celebrities will start jumping in as like they were best friends.

mohamad
Guest
I was about to comment on this: “We always look at sports and performing arts figures, we forget those in science, the military, the fine arts, and others who have achievements based on discipline and good behavior.” but then you said this (which was the point I wanted to raise): “And the ultimate lesson: if the Gilas team wins, it’s not because they are Pinoy. It’s because they are disciplined… which most Pinoys are not.” World class athletes are what they are not only because of talent but also and more importantly because of hard work and discipline. So I… Read more »
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[…] is the main reason Gogs, FallenAngel and I came out with criticisms of the Gilas fandom. The way these fans behave is pulling down the country. Like with Manny […]

Walang Putok
Guest
List of World Famous Filipinos: Cheryl Burke – ballroom dancer, participant in Dancing with the Stars[1] Ryan “Ryanimay” Conferido – member of Quest Crew and alumnus of So You Think You Can Dance Napoleon D’umo – hip-hop choreographer on So You Think You Can Dance since season four and supervising choreographer for America’s Best Dance Crew Cris Judd – choreographer Charles Klapow – choreographer for all three High School Musical films, The Ice Tour, and The Cheetah Girls 2 Dominic “D-Trix” Sandoval – former member of Quest Crew and alumnus of So You Think You Can Dance Education Luis Ma.… Read more »
joeld
Guest

So what is your point?

david
Guest
Is this a joke? I’m not sure. “world famous” ????? World famous means people other than filipinos and some americans have heard of them. Just so you know there is plenty of world that doesn’t live and breathe good ol US of A. I must admit there is an impressive list of dancers,cartoonists and poets. Impressive in number. Not sure of the world beating quality. Only other point worth making is actually a question. Are these people filipino who grew up in PH? Are they americans with some or all filipino blood? Becuase if it’s the blood that counts can… Read more »
Gogs
Member

To understand all the chest beating, this one phrase never fails me: “KSP is the root of all evil”.

Walang Putok
Guest

Well they are Filipino. I am just sharing the accomplishments of our brothers and sisters.

Bruno Mars, Vanessa Hudgens, and APL are just from the entertainment industry. I want to give our fellow Pinoys a list of role models from other professons because we all cant sing as good as Bruno Mars.

david
Guest
This is my very point. Sorry they are not actually (many) Filipino. My first post was a bit sarcastic. Bruno Marrs is not Filipino. He grew up in Hawaii and for all intents and purposes he is american. Having Filipino blood doesn’t make him Filipino nor does it explain his success. My very point about my own ancestory. I have russian, english, scottish (and for all I know other bits of junk DNA) blood. So when I say I’m very well educated, had a very successful career to what should I attribute it? I was born and raised in Australia.… Read more »
david
Guest

I know people born to Filipino mothers and Australian fathers….trust me, they don’t think of themselves as filipino. Some having visited family in PH swear they will never visit again.

david
Guest
joeld
Guest
Sablay kasi ang Pinoy Prde e. I remember Ayrton Senna to the Brazilians. Whatever Senna achieved during his lifetime, for sure the Brazilians were proud of him. People around the world looked up to him too. But that is as far as it goes for them. For Pinoy Prayders, they take this pride to a whole new level. As in the case of Pacquiao, a true champion. Pinoy prayders will insist on inserting the word Pinoy to that. The whole world also looks up to him, but pinoy prayders will insist that they be treated the same as pacquiao because… Read more »
WinterSoldier
Guest

Respect is earned, not given or demanded.

Sa post mo pa lamang, alam ko na agad kung anong klaseng tao ka.

BARBARO. -_-

WinterSoldier
Guest

Oh yeah, your comment is DISRESPECTFUL.

Enjoy your HELL. 😀

imaruti.com
Guest

Hey! I know this is kinda off topic but I’d figured I’d ask.
Would you be interested in exchanging links
or maybe guest authoring a blog post or vice-versa?
My site addresses a lot of the same subjects as yours and I think we could
greatly benefit from each other. If you happen to be interested feel free to shoot me an e-mail.
I look forward to hearing from you! Fantastic blog
by the way!

cartman
Guest

HOY GAGO KANG SUMULAT NITONG ARTIKUL. KUNG WALA KANG MABUTING SABIHIN SA KUPUNAN NG PINAS PEDE BA TUMAHIMIK KA NA LANG.

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