Will “equality” and “acceptance” really make gay people happy? Probably not.

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This, it seems, is the underlying premise of the “Gay Movement”. An entire industry, a vast landscape of political agendas, and lucrative businesses have been built around this debatable premise. Marketers and brand managers have gotten behind the rainbow flag salivating over the vast new markets it will create. Politicians got on the bandwagon and did rain dances in anticipation of the voter count bonanaza. It seems everyone is profiting from the “Gay Movement” — except gay people.

Take the latest postergirl of the transgender community — Gretchen Diez. In the ensuing circus following her arrest for demanding that she be allowed to use the women’s toilets at a mall, every “influencer”, “activist” leader, and politician and their cats pounced on the opportunity to milk a bit of media mileage from her 15 minutes of fame. Unfortunately for them the mob included people who begged to differ to the collective snowflake position. Even more unfortunate — for them — an erstwhile silent majority agreed with this position that challenges the snowflake dogma. Who emerged the loser out of all that? Diez.

Perhaps it is high time we all step back and understand what it is exactly that makes gay people happy or, for that matter, what makes people happy. A clue lies in the position on the matter Ricky Reyes takes. When a categorically successful person like Reyes weighs in on anything, it is his success and money that talks — not his or her gender or sexual orientation. Whatever one may say, successful people did something right regardless of the cards they were dealt at birth. Much as we might screech about money not being the measure of a person’s worth, the fact is, it is money that gives people power in the bed we’ve made for our species. So when Ricky Reyes weighs in on the other side of the snowflake position, he contributes a substantial argument.

Clearly, Reyes is, perhaps arguably, happy but, most definitely, fulfilled by his personal success. When you are an absolute success at something you did in life, your being gay, a woman, or a man wanting to be a woman, gets less of the limelight. The latter three become irrelevant. And right there is your answer.

It doesn’t matter who or what you are. It’s what you did that defines you. Indeed, the late Michael Jackson nailed it in his iconic 1991 song “Black and White” with this standout ine: “I’m not going to spend my life being a color”. Many gay “activists” seem to see no problem spending their life being defined by their gayness and, worse, want the members of their entire community to spend their lives the same way. In effect, they are setting up an entire generation of gay people to lead unhappy lives.

Because gay “activists” have thus far not clearly defined what “success” means for gay people as far as how they had framed their “cause”, they will likely be forever unsatisfied with any notional gains they make in their “fight”. We see this today in the way the LGBTQ+ “cause” keeps wanting more. This perpetual demand for more is what produces tragic figures like Gretchen Diez.

More sensible people like Ricky Reyes are telling us, enough is enough.

Ang affair ng mga bakla dapat sa atin lang ‘yan. ‘Wag nating pangalandakan. Bakit pa kailangan sabihin sa madlang people na ‘Huy, intindihin mo nga ako. Bakla ako.

Translated: “The affairs of gay people are our own community’s alone. Let’s not impose this on others. Why do we pester people by telling them ‘Hey, pay attention to us. We are gay.'”

Attention all gay “activists”: Don’t worry. Be happy.

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