An Uncommon Filipino Man

If we want the country to change, we have to change how we think and in doing so, change how we are living out our lives.

While I was searching for some inspiration for a much longer article, I came across a video of Les Brown and at the ten minute mark, I heard the most amazing oratorical piece I have ever heard. I urge you to click here to watch the video. (or watch it below)

Here is the piece transcribed:

I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be uncommon — if I can.

I seek opportunity — not security. I do not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me.

I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed.

I refuse to barter incentive for a dole.

I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale calm of utopia.

I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a handout.

I will never cower before any master nor bend to any threat.

It is my heritage to stand erect, proud and unafraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the benefit of my creations, and to face the world boldly and say, this I have done.

I was surprised that it contained the very mindset that I had found lacking in myself a couple years back before I started doing freelance projects.

I wonder, how our country would be if a lot more Filipinos strive to be uncommon men and women?

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15 Comments on “An Uncommon Filipino Man”

  1. This is what I’ve always said about our country and our people.

    ‘Our country is corrupt because our people are corrupt; our people are corrupt because our culture is corrupt; and our culture is corrupt because our value system is corrupt.’

    Therefore, the problems of our people lie in our dysfunctional value system, which has been adulterated by our indigenous tribal and feudal tradition, our aristocratic Spanish heritage and lineage, and our love-hate (envy and admiration) relationship with our former American colonizers and benefactors.

    This volatile combination of tribal, aristocratic, and western characteristics are the ingredients that makeup our “Colonial and Crab Mentalities,” and, in turn, define our dysfunctional value system that is has been destroying our country for generations.

  2. This is what I’ve always said about our country and our people.

    ‘Our country is corrupt because our people are corrupt; our people are corrupt because our culture is corrupt; and our culture is corrupt because our value system is corrupt.’

    Therefore, the problems of our people lie in our dysfunctional value system, which has been adulterated by our indigenous tribal and feudal tradition, our aristocratic Spanish heritage and lineage, and our love-hate (envy and admiration) relationship with our former American colonizers and benefactors.

    This volatile combination of tribal, aristocratic, and western characteristics are the ingredients that makeup our “Colonial and Crab Mentalities,” and, in turn, define our dysfunctional value system that has been destroying our country for generations.

  3. Les Brown is an African American Radio Commentator, from Ohio. He conducted seminars to better yourself, after his stint as a radio personality.

    I like his Philosophies in life. However, I had not the chance to attend one of his seminars.

    His teachings inspire me.

  4. This column gives encouragement because it invests people with the power to know, learn, understand and control their destiny the way they see fit to bring happiness to their lives.

  5. You are an uncommon opinion maker and you do service to your fellows that way. Thank you for sharing your insightful experiences about our human existence.

  6. The quote ‘Stale calm of Utopia…’ seems to have been uttered by someone who has never been to ‘Utopia’ and experienced it.

    No doubt the Philippines needs to change, GOOD LUCK WITH THAT. BET ON THIS: 50 years from now, if the country is not underwater, the same people will be running the country because NO ONE has the balls to get rid of the tyrannical scumbags that are ruining the future of the future citizens of the nation who are as yet unborn..

  7. If the Philippines, and it’s people, studies the teachings of Buddhism (it is not a religion but a philosophy on how to look at life), Filipinos will gain a better understanding of who they are and what they are doing to their country and each other.

  8. I believe in the uncommon, the unusual and unlikely, even the miraculous. I believe in nearly all things except impossibilities. That I can’t fathom.

  9. It boils down to self awareness and knowing that money doesn’t make one happy. It helps to distract us from our sadness and illusions in life. Money follows those who are happy.

    Lets learn from the dying. When is about to die, all one wants is to ask forgiveness and be forgiven. PEACE in the end,

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