Filipinos… World Class Everywhere, Except in the Philippines!

Third of a Series on the Manila Bay Reclamation

Who knows, maybe it’s an inner “evolutionary drive” more than a “bad, mismanaged economy” that’s driving our fellow Filipinos to work abroad?

That white concrete dome you see when you pass by UP Diliman on Commonwealth Avenue is the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. I assume, that coupled with the Bataan Nuclear Power Plant, would have led to a lot more Filipinos becoming nuclear physicists.  What's the use of that? If you're a progressive minded greenie, think "Dark Knight Rises".
That white concrete dome you see when you pass by UP Diliman on Commonwealth Avenue is the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. I assume, that coupled with the Bataan Nuclear Power Plant, would have led to a lot more Filipinos becoming nuclear physicists. What’s the use of that? If you’re a progressive minded greenie, think “Dark Knight Rises”.

For instance, if you studied nuclear physics, would you ever find a job here? Perhaps, yes. Then again, perhaps, you might also be underemployed or suffer some form of intellectual stagnation.

Perhaps you might end up teaching complex mathematics to brats in Ateneo or La Salle or UP, who will, more or less doubt the usefulness of such a subjects. Save for those fleeting, drunken “magic moments” in the wee hours of morning when everyone thinks they’re profound by quoting Einstein or some other “intellectual”, but are actually quoting dialogues from a Dilbert book — or graphic novel, if it can be called that.

I guess the same goes for all Filipinos who are professionals in engineering, medical science, and other fields that are grounded on science. (Note that I didn’t include lawyers, certified public accountants, journalists, performance artists, indie film makers, et cetera. Because, as far as I am concerned, there are just too many of these types already and for the most part, I don’t think they really add to economic growth. )

A couple of in-laws of mine are engineers and one or two of them don’t really find the Philippines an “exciting” place as all as far as engineering projects are concerned. After all, what was the last greatest engineering project here in the Philippines?

Some of the great projects we have had are basically muddled in so much controversy by self-professed well meaning “advocates” for one cause or another.

Take all the Marcosian Edifices, the Mega Dike Project, and the NAIA Terminal Three — not one of them emerged from the drawing board unscathed by the usual charges of corruption, environmental destruction, and other par for the course brick bats.

Do you know, for instance, that a number of congressmen whose congressional districts surrounds Laguna de Bay are having a hell of a time trying to get approval for the construction of a coastal road/dike? Why?

It’s because all the fisherfolk in their jurisdiction argue that they will lose livelihood. But, what kind of livelihood do these people have apart from their perennial complaint of having less fish to catch every year? If fishing is no longer any good, I guess the logical thing for them to do is to look for some other form of livelihood that provides products or services that they can sell for a better price. But that’s a whole other discussion which will probably be countered by appeals to preserve the “fisherfolk culture” or some other “heritage” based argument.

imelda by carlos celdranIf the Americans had actually paid heed to the landed elite who build their mansions along Manila Bay (that glorified district composed of Malate/Remedios/Ermita), I don’t think Roxas Boulevard would have been built.

Or for that matter, I don’t think the CCP Complex would have been built either. Where the frick would Carlos “Damaso” Celdran be doing his Imelda Tours? That’s something to think about, isn’t it.

If the Americans had listened to the interests of the old, long gone Manila elite in the area, would Quirino Grandstand be where it is today? Would we have the Manila Oceanarium? Would we have the Mall of Asia?

In any case, I think what is really holding us back as a people is the rather mistaken notion that we cannot build things that are already quite common place in other parts of the world.

Ever wonder why houses in squatter areas are so small and cramped? Because they were built by people who have been told all their lives that they cannot build anything as big as their dreams. They are a cowed, defeated lot — as Dick Gordon would say.

One thing we can do this very minute that can help our country is to go against this “defeated” way of thinking that tells us “You can’t do that because… you’re poor, you were born to a big family, you went to public school, you didn’t go to college, etcetera…”

Give that thinking a BIG FAT F*CK YOU. In any case, enough of my Gordonian rant.

I really intended to write a short introduction to something that I asked a good friend to write because among all the people I talk with, this speaks from a rather good vantage point.

JP Fenix was among the first reporters of Philippine Daily Inquirer and eventually took the reigns as VP for Operations. He used to blog at gmanews.tv and now mainly takes care of a wonder kid named Lucas, with bouts of some consultancy work when he can squeeze it in.

He has been around and then some, which is why I defer to his point of view in a number of matters which include history, journalism ethics, economics, food, cars, and cheap but good gadgets.

His perspective on reclamation projects is one that ought to be considered well, if not in light of the protests against reclamation projects in Manila Bay and everywhere else in the country, then, perhaps in light of providing a project where Filipino genius can shine.

Here is the first part of JP’s piece:

Land reclamation has always fascinated me, first because of all the groundbreaking (literally) technology and processes it involves, but also of the opportunities it opens up for a saturated populace.

hongkong international airportThis fascination was recently rekindled in a visit to Hong Kong, where the HK International Airport impressively sits and operates from a man-made island, reclaimed from the sea and linked to the center of commerce and civilization by high speed rail and highways. It’s a marvel, especially if you try to fathom what went into its creation and the major problem it solved.

The old Kai Tak airport was situated in the middle of all the Hong Kong action, so much so that Jumbo Jets has to maneuver ever so tightly through high rise buildings to take off and land. Even as a passenger you don’t notice it. But pilots do it daily, landing and taking off by the seat of their pants. And a recent feature on Discovery Cannel documenter this harrowing experience so well that it removed all doubt that the rapidly growing Chinese territory needed a safer way to bring passenger and cargo in and out.

My interest in reclamation came from my childhood bonding with my father was a civil engineer that specialized in what they called “earth moving.” Basically in construction this involved changing the landscape to suit what needed to be done. The shorthand for it is that they can make mountains out of molehills and vice versa, depending on the job order specs. I guess he learned this from his earlier stint as a US army engineer, helping build the facilities in Guam and Subic, and later on as a civilian as executor of the urban reform of the newly established Olongapo City as City Engineer to then Mayor James Gordon.

I particularlyearth moving remember in the early 70s, I stood watching intently for hours as the giant dump trucks lined up to dump earth and rocks from the mountains into the edge of the Manila/ Pasay reclamation area, where later the CCP complex would stand.

But the Manila experience is nothing compared to what has been done all over the world. In fact, the reclamation projects in the country, especially Manila, has been marred by so much disadvantageous events that the vision that American architect and city planner Daniel Burnham in his 1905 plan did not bloom fully. Just glimpses of what was supposed to be Manila’s true glory.

Historical record has it that then Governor-General William Howard Taft invited Burnham to plan a modern Manila, specifically as a Paris on the Prairie or a Manila versiona of the Grand mall of Washington DC in the US.

The proposed capitol has Jose Rizal’s monument in Luneta, followed by a lagoon and quadrangle then the buildings of different government offices to the Capitol Building in what is now Taft Avenue, all of which are facing the sea. But the dawn of World War II put a halt to this, as only three structures came up: the Finance and Agriculture buildings (thus AgriFina circle) and the Legislative Building. All of which will be the national museum system when the Department of Toursim finally leaves the area.

Approved by the US Congress in 1905, the Burnham plan started the reclamation if Manila Bay in that same year and work to reclaim the bay front started in mid-year. This reclamation was to provide the basic land need for the broader Burnham Manila plan which, aside from the capitol, included the Port Area, South and North Harbors and all the way to what was supposed be a seaside drive all the way to Cavite City.

Navy Yacht Club ManilaJaime Laya, former Central Bank Governor and former chair of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) wrote recently: “The Manila Yacht Club, Philippine Navy Headquarters and the U.S. Embassy were built on new land, but the rest was Dewey (now Roxas) Boulevard and its wide promenades. Mansions rose on the old shore, including Andres Luna de San Pedro palaces for the Zobels at the corner of Padre Faura, the Perkinses (“El Nido”) on Cuarteles and a sugar baron near Malate church. Till recently the ruins of Manuel Quezon’s home stood against the skyline near Buendia… That was it until President Diosdado Macapagal’s time when businessman Harry Stonehill started large-scale reclamation. There was a big corruption exposé involving people in high places; Stonehill was deported and the project came to an abrupt stop.

“After Ferdinand Marcos was elected in 1965, First Lady Imelda Marcos resumed reclamation for the Cultural Center and later for the government financial center. After the Cavite Coastal Road was built in the 1980s, more land was reclaimed between Pasay and Bacoor.”

Of course, now, the Coastal Road stretches all the way as CAVITEX, giving direct access to Kawit and Emilio Aguinaldo’s shrine and the birth of the first Philippine Republic.

Imagine, all that took a century, and then some.

As our country is engaged in corruption, political bickering and so many time delays, the rest of the world has grown through reclamation.

 

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73 Comments on “Filipinos… World Class Everywhere, Except in the Philippines!”

  1. I for one support reclamation as a solution to the urban nightmare that is Metro Manila. I even proposed of getting rid of the airports (MIA NAIA T1,T2, & T3) out of Pasay/Paranaque area and move it in a reclaimed artificial island somewhere in Manila bay:

    http://www.pinoyexchange.com/forums/showthread.php?t=536476&page=4

    …But personally, I would not go with this route and prefer to have a new airport outside Metro Manila (heck, technically outside Luzon) so as to adopt to the future development. An airport in a densely populated and developed area will be an aviation transportation & security nightmare waiting to happen, hence the old HK airport from Kowloon was moved to Chek lap Kok island. My proposed solution is to built an artificial island through reclamation several kilometers west of Manila, approximately at the center of Manila Bay to be connected via underground tunnel to Metro Manila’s major transportation hubs (provincial railway stations, LRT/MRT stations, bus stations, ports, NLEX/SLEX connector roads, etc.). The reclaimed materials will be coming from:

    a.) dredged silts of the PASAMAR river systems (Pasig, San Juan, & Marikina), NMTT River systems (Navotas-Malabon-Tenejeros-Tullahan), Paranaque River and their tributaries and its esteros ==>Metro Manila’s natural waterways;

    b.) dredged materials from Laguna Lake

    c.) dredged silts of Bulacan river delta & riversystems and its tributaries (marilao-meycauayan-Obando river, Calumpit river, Angat river)

    d.) dredged silts and lahar of Pampanga river delta

    e.) treated waste materials from dumpsites and landfills of metropolis and provinces adjacent Manila Bay (Metro Manila, Bulacan, Cavite, Pampanga, Bataan).

    Besides addressing the inefficient domestic (yes, including the domestic) and NAIA terminals (yes, including T2 & T3) as country’s premier air transportation hubs, the proposed solution also addresses the following major issues:

    1.) Flooding

    – By doing (a), you are thereby clearing and increasing the capacity & efficiency of Metro Manila’s natural waterways thus a more flood-resilient Metro Manila

    – By doing (b), you are increasing the carrying capacity thus increasing the flood resiliency of Rizal & Laguna municipalities surrounding Laguna Lake.

    – By doing (c) & (d), you are increasing the flood resiliency of Pampanga & Bulacan provinces thus never again ‘Pedring’ & ‘Quiel’ devastation

    2.) Traffic

    – By removing the airport in the middle of densely populated metropolis, you are decongesting Metro Manila’s traffic problem. A freeway/expressway, even a railway traversing the heart of Metro Manila is now more feasible by removing/rerouting the unnecessary road networks that used to be the ‘arteries’ of the road network system to-and-fro both the international & domestic airports. The tunnel from airport to major transportation hubs further increases the efficiency to regional movement.

    – By doing (a), (b), (c), and (d),preferably up to navigable depths, you are providing an alternative mode of transportation – water transportation. This is particularly important to local/domestic tanker and cargo ships because increasing their traffic volume, number and distance of routes means reduction of traditional land-based movement of goods by cargo/haul and tanker trucks in our roads.

    3.) Waste management

    – By doing (e), you are increasing the capacities (and even maybe reopening) of existing landfills thus no need for new land fills. By removing the contents of existing fills, you are increasing the buffer for waste disposal for future generations. Also, by removing and rehabilitating existing land fills, these landfills can be utilised to produce electricity by building and installing a waste-to-power generation plant = a more sustainable approach to waste management.

    4.) Increased Biodiversity
    – By doing (a), (b), (c), and (d), you are potentially reviving the river ecosystem thus attracting different river/estuarine life and migratory birds.

    5.) Urban Redevelopment

    – Removing the airports will also remove the restriction of erecting tall buildings. Currently, building in Metro Manila are restricted to build up to 250 m (even lower as you go near the airport) due to air traffic requirement from Civil Aviation Authority. Without height restrictions, we can now build taller buildings thus a more efficient use of space.

    – The area occupied by the airports is prime real estate thus it can be sold to private developers. The income generated from this WILL be used to fund the development of the new airport in an artificial island in Manila Bay

    – Or use the space to develop worthy of hosting an Olympic event!

    6.) Enhanced economic activity

    – By addressing the issue on traffic and efficient logistics of goods and people, you are increasing the economic activities.

    – Having an urban redeveloment will trigger the influx of money to real estate and construction industry thus providing jobs and an increase in economic activity in the region.

      1. Thanks. You’ll be surprised of how relatively short period of time I have come up with the working concept of this. The only reason I was able to come up with this kind of solution in a relatively short period of time, is that I work in a global multi-disciplinary engineering consultancy which tackles these kind of problems and have been trained to think in a ‘hybrid’ manner (i.e. discipline paradigm shift to find other way of addressing the problem).

        1. Any ideas on integrating alternative power generation technologies in the reclaimed land? Like hydroelectric turbines off the new islands you are building?

        1. @Johnny Saint, I’m not sure what you mean with ‘hydroelectric power source’ in a reclaimed land but there’s not much renewable energy alternative to choose from in a reclaimed land. Hydroelectric requires to have a significant stored and constant water source in an elevated distance from the turbine to harness its potential energy (we don’t have that in the reclaimed airport). Energy from tidal barges requires to have significant water head between low tide and high tide (not feasible in Philippines due to very narrow band of difference). Energy from waves and undersea current are not feasible in this side of the planet due to relatively calm seas in the tropics(except perhaps where there’s localised increase due to geomorphology). Wind energy from wind turbines are not practical since it will mess up the radar system of the airport. Solar may be feasible provided it will not be a safety issue in the navigation. Another potential source of energy perhaps will be waste-to-energy power (either using the solid waste or the methane by-product as fuel to the thermal power plant).

  2. The best long term solution to Metro Manila (and possibly soon for other metropolitan areas like Cebu, Bacolod and Davao) is to disperse economic and intellectual opportunities outside de facto centers. Create better incentives for investment to flow. And one way for these to happen is, for the nth time… constitutional amendment.

  3. A slight deviation, but relevant to the topic:

    I’m totally for nuclear energy, and I wonder why a lot of Filipinos are afraid of it. Based on the mess we have now, we have just four options for energy:

    a) stop using energy entirely and go back to pre-industrial society;

    b) continue letting our addiction to fossil fuels ruin our environment, dictate our economy, and fight our wars, until we run out of them and involuntarily fall back to a);

    c) convert half of the island of Mindanao into solar, wind and geothermal farms, because that’s how much land area it would take to meet current energy needs;

    d) go nuclear.

    Our friendly relations with the United States, Japan and several EU nations can be used as an advantage for us to go nuclear, which can supply 100% of the country’s energy demands until the end of the century. That’s if we got our power only from nuclear. Barring that, there’s plenty of uranium buried elsewhere too, including in other friendly nations like Canada and Australia.

    New breeder reactor techniques allow us to reuse an increasingly significant amount of waste material, extending our usable supply by multiple factors.

    The potency of fission energy is so efficient that the total solid waste generated by a medium-sized city like, say, Bacolod, for the entire lifetime of its population, including charging their electric cars if everyone drove them, would fit into a modest country home, and that’s ignoring breeder techniques. Using coal and gas, that same home would fit the waste produced by just one family in one year.

    Nuclear plants produce virtually no pollution, and no radiation. You could live your entire life next to a functioning nuclear facility, growing and eating crops and drinking from streams, and never receive more than the normal background dose of radiation. Fossil fuel plants constantly eject their waste haphazardly into the atmosphere–and a great deal of that waste is radioactive.

    Contrary to popular belief, nuclear facilities are among the safest places you could be, precisely because they are perceived to be so dangerous. The nuclear power industry practices a manic culture of safety, answering to various international regulatory agencies which constantly bombard them with tests and inspections. Homer Simpson couldn’t go anywhere near a real nuclear plant.

    It is IMPOSSIBLE to make any sort of weapon out of power-grade uranium or plutonium at any point in its cycle. Enriching material to weapons-grade takes a far more involved process; the only way for a bad guy to obtain a nuclear bomb is to steal one that has already been made by a government that knows how.

    In the past sixty years, there have been, worldwide, three major nuclear accidents. Three Mile Island was caused by human error; we learned from it and fixed the system–Three Mile Island will never happen again. Chernobyl was incompetence; the Soviets were screwing around without considering the consequences. Chernobyl could never happen here. Fukushima was caused by a natural disaster; we will learn from it, and amend our rules about where to build and how well they’re built.

    Meanwhile, conventional power plants (such as for coal and gas), particularly in our country, suffer catastrophic failures on a regular basis.

    It’s time for the Philippines to appreciate the positives of nuclear energy, instead of trying to find ways out of investing in it.

    1. I personally like the idea of building 4th Generation nuclear plants, ones that actually use much less nuclear material and also recycle nuclear waste for energy.

      Of course, there’s the usual opposition and we have to consider the backlash from the Fukushima thing.

      But I do agree with you, Midway.

      1. The smart thing to do would be to adopt a hybrid solution. Photovoltaics/Solar power, windmills, hydroelectric power, geothermal power, natural gas and yes — fossil fuels like oil and coal. None of the first five alternative power generation technologies are anywhere near the efficiency of fossil fuel technologies. Solar power is at 15-20% efficiency while the power we can derive from burning fossil fuels is at 75-85% efficiency. Combining all the technologies available to us will be more cost effective. At the same time carbon emissions will be reduced without the perceived potential risk of nuclear plants. Meanwhile, solar power generation, etc. will be allowed to mature and develop to a point where they can replace non-renewable fossil fuel technologies.

        1. As far as renewable energy discussions are concerned, a lot of proponents are in favor of a mix (waste to energy, PV, solar thermal, nth Generation nuclear, wave tech, wind generators).

          PV in the Philippines needs to be the tropical kind because as PV heats up, it produces electricity at a lower efficiently. Conversion, I think, is only up to 15% or 20%.

          Solar Thermal might be the better option. You basically harvest heat, turn water to steam and then use that to drive turbines as in conventional power generation.

          Moreover, you can install the system on the outer shell and roof tops of most buildings. Perhaps, this will even contribute a significant percentage of the building’s power needs.

        2. Paul,

          Something new in solar energy technology: “solar paint”

          The University of Newcastle (Australia) is developing a method of suspending semiconducting polymers in a liquid. Initially done in water, this has led to the production of a solar paint or ink, infused with the conductive properties of the suspended polymers, that can be applied to various materials like steel, plastic, even concrete. Wired to inverter boxes, the paint/ink can produce electricity in the same way that conventional silicon solar panels operate when exposed to sunlight. Researchers believe that ultimately it will be possible to paint the conductive liquid directly onto a roof or wall, or even apply it as a window tint. Its a low-cost, environmentally sustainable technology that could eventually have individual houses and buildings produce electricity for their own use and even feed it back into the grid.

  4. I am a technical man. I studied in the Philippines, but, I cannot find a good position to grow for my profession. So, I migrated to America. I studied in America, to retool my obsolete technical knowledge to fit the advanced American technology. And to find a good position to grow.
    In our country, It’s all politics. Not what you know, but whom you know…this is the cause of stagnation and brain drain in our country.
    Reclamation projects will require a lot of
    public funds again. It does not solve the yearly flood problems. It will be another cause of huge corruptions.

    1. So basically you turned your back to the country that birthed and nourished you. For what? So that you can earn more money and buy a nice car and a shiny I-Phone?

      Wala kang utang na loob. Wala kang delicadesa. Bakit? Kasi galit ka sa iyong sarili. Huwag kang makinig sa mga tao na minamaliit ang kagalingan ng ating Bansa. Ikaw ay isang Pilipino. Tanggapin mo ang responsibilidad na paunlarin ang iyong bansa tulad ng responsibilidad ng isang anak para sa kanyang mga magulang. Gawin mo ito dahil ito ang katotohanan. Hindi ka linagay ng Diyos sa mundong ito para magpayaman sa California at magpakasaya sa Las Vegas. Mahilin mo ang iyong TUNAY na bansa dahil isa kang TUNAY na Pilipino!

      1. Not everyone leaves purely for money.
        Some leave for the opportunity to apply their skills in a more receptive and stimulating environment.
        To have greater intellectual and creative freedom.
        To be challenged and developed.
        To give rather than take
        Usually money/success comes as a by product of commitment and endeavour and lifelong learning, so some of us are not driven by money alone, however much we make. It is in our psyche to contribute and achieve.
        Sad that you see yourself differently. and maybe therein lies the problem.
        such attitudes do not create world class companies, best practice etc. so i assume you have not/ do not run a major company, or understand what it takes to cimpete un a global environment.

        1. Trouble with Pinoys is that they have a very narrow grasp of what can constitute personal motivation and it usually does not go beyond money. If you overhear Pinoys talk, 80% of the time the topic will be about money. Pinoys are so obssessed with money in a way that is grossly disproportionate to their inherent ability to make money..

        2. Libertas,

          Chistiano ka ba? Saan mo ba napulot na gusto ng Diyos na kailangan maging mayaman at mahusay sa mundo ang isang tao? Hindi ba sinabi ng ating panginoon na mas madali pang lumusot ang isang malaking hayop sa mata karayom kaysa makapasko ang isang mayaman na tao sa langit?

          Importante ba sa Diyos na ikaw ay nasa “major company” at sa “global environment”? Eh kung ganoon bakit hindi pumunta si Jesus at ang kanyang mga discipolo sa “Roma” para magtrabaho sa “major company” para sa kanilang “global trade routes”?

        3. Proud Pinoy,

          Isa kang HANGAL.

          Which person deserves your respect — the one never stops whining and needs to ingratiate himself with Kris and Noynoy or the one that motivates himself to seek out an environment that will stimulate his development and force him to grow?

          Which country deserves your respect — the one that offered you nothing, that made living conditions so miserable they forced you to leave or the one that took you all in and gave you the opportunity to live out your dreams?

        4. Many Pinoys would like to have lots of money because they believe they can buy attention, and with attention they can buy pride. KSP is still the root of all evil.

        5. The biggest reason why my sister left the Ph to be a nurse in the US in the 1980’s was so that she could practice her profession in a world class hospital in the US.

          Of course, with that comes money.

          Here in PH, there’s a lot of competition for top spots and there’s few top spots where you can really flourish.

          In the US, it’s almost for the picking to anyone who wants it bad enough.

        6. @Proud Pinoy

          Don’t you know Abraham is rich?

          Don’t you know that Daniel worked for two paganistic kingdoms?

          God call us to glorify Him in wherever we are, what ever our profession is.

          “So, whether you eat or drink, or uwhatever you do, do all to the glory of God. ”
          – 1 Corinthians 10:31

      2. Ingat lang sa salita. Baka yung sinasabi mong nagpapayaman sa US, eh nagpapakain ng pamilya dito sa Manila o sa probinsiya. Dun siya nagtrabaho kasi wala ngang makuhang trabaho ditong matino.

        Hindi ka linagay ng Diyos sa mundong ito para magdakdak lamang ng walang pag-iintindi.

        1. Chino,

          Buti naman meron pala marunong mag-tagalog dito. Pa-english-english sila pero marunong naman sila mag-tagalog. Kanino ba sila nag-papasikat eh lahat naman tayo dito nakaka-intindi.

          Tama ang sinabi ni Rizal: “Ang hindi marunong magmahal sa sariling wika ay higit pa sa mabaho at malansang isda.”

          Pero balik tayo sa sinabi mo. Honga pwede siland magpayaman at magpagaling sa ibang bansa pero sino naman ang matitirang may utak na mag-papatakbo ng ating bansa? Kung lahat ng matalino ay aalis, naiiwanan tayo sa mga bobong tao na tulad ni GMA at Erap. Buti na lang ah kahit tumira si Kris at Noynoy sa America ay bumalik sila para maglinkod sa atin bansa. Ayan ang tunay na Pilipino! Hindi nila nakalimutan ang kanilang pinaggalingan kasi meron siland “utang na loob.”

          Kaya malaki ang utang na loob natin kay Noynoy.

        2. Malaki ang utang ng loob kay Noynoy? Walang utang ng loob ang kahit kaynino sa kanya. Siya ang may utang ng loob sa bayan kasi binoto siya. Eh di siya magpauwi ng mga OFWs, bigyan niya ng trabahong maayos dito.

          Kung sa bagay, isa ka ka palang sumipsip tulad ng iba.

          And go back to fricking English, will ya sendonggirl/fishball/vincenzo arellano?

        3. @Proud Pinoy:

          Si Erap lang ang bobo, hindi si GMA. At least pinaunlad pa niya ang ekonomiya dito Noynoy is MUCH WORSE. As ChinoF said, kailangan maraming trabaho dito and there is no need for OFWs. Blame our archaic economic system for that kasi iyon talaga ang dahil kung bakit maraming matalino ang umalis sa Pilipinas. Galit ang mga Pilipino sa mga TAONG MATATALINO. So bulok ang comment mo dahil BOBO ang bumoto kay Noynoy, believe it or not.

          Also, THINK OF YOUR SINS:

          “Well I was using old spoof nicks all the time. So old folks like you, benign0, Toro, etc knew all along what was up.

          I am still flabbergasted why so many Pinoys don’t appreciate satire and sarcasm. Sometimes you can make a point more devastatingly effective that way.

          Oh well, back to life. Until the next Philippine catastrophe. Have fun guys. The Philippines will remain a shit hole and there is only one solution: GET THE F*** OUT.

          Peace.”

        1. Trosp,

          Bakit? Natamaan ka ba? Alam ko na maginhawa ang buhay mo diyan sa Australia. Pero sana huwag mong kalimutan na maraming tao naghihirap dito sa iyong bansang pinanggalingan.

          Kaya kung pwede, pagisipan mong mabuti ang responsibilidad mo sa iyong inang bayan. Siguro naman hindi ka tulad ng ibang Pinoy diyan na masyadong “trying-hard” maging puti sa ibang bansa.

          Pilipino ka. Kahit pa-english-english ka, Pinoy ka pa rin. Kahit may I-Phone at BMW ka, Pinoy ka pa rin. Kaya tanggapin mo ang iyong responsibilidad.

        2. @Proud Pinoy:

          Pilipino ako. Hindi Pinoy. IKAW lang iyon.

          Honestly, you’re doing this just for the sake of trolling. You don’t even get that some of us here are not in keen of your satire and sarcasm. 😛

      3. Proud Pinoy, sige, magpakamatay ka para sa bansa mo.

        Ako, gusto kong yumaman at mabuhay ng matagal.

        Kung hindi dito, eh di sa ibang bansa.

        Tapos, kapag mayaman na ako, magtataguyod ako ng isang korporasyon kung saan lahat ng magagaling at masisipag ang i-employ ko. Itutulak ko silang maging mayaman din at magkaruon ng maraming anak.

        In time, dadami ang magagaling na tao sa Pinas and it will not be because of this false notion of partiotism that calls people to suffer.

        1. Manong Paul,

          Eh hindi ba namatay si Rizal para sa atin? Si Ninoy din diba? At siyempre wag natin kalimutan na namatay din si Jesus para iligtas tayo lahat sa impyerno.

          Lahat tayo mamamtay din. Ang tanong ko sa iyo eh kung gusto mo na mamatay na may dahilan ang buhay mo? Pero kung gusto mo lang yumaman diba alam natin ang nakasulat sa Bibliya diyan.

          P.S. Sa U.P. or Collegiong Publika ba nag-aral ang kapatid mong nurse? Kasi sabi ni Ma’am Winnie Monsod, lahat ng nag-aral sa Publikang Paaralan na tumakbo sa ibang bansa ay may utang na P1,000,000 dahil na subsidiya ang kanilang pag-aral ng pera ng mga tao.

        2. Ikaw na Proud Pinoy ka, huwag mo nga kaming gamitan ng Bible rip-offs kasi napaka-blasphemous talaga.

          O ano naman ngayon kung may utang na malaki ang mga nars sa gobyerno? Kung ayaw ng gov’t magbigay ng subsidy despite the demands of nurses, oh, well. Point is, ginusto ng government na magbigay eh.

          Paul is right. Hindi ka makakapamigay ng biyaya sa ibang tao kung ikaw mismo, hindi pa mayaman at mahaba ang buhay. Phillip McGraw: you can’t give away what you don’t have.

          And shut that crap about Rizal. People who had read them carefully like Ambeth Ocampo and I would actually tell you to the face that if Rizal, Ninoy, and Jesus Christ were alive today, you ignorant Pinoys would shoot them all over again.

      4. Bakit may utang na loob pa? Hindi naman nya po kasalan na maipanganak sa bansa na to. Mulat mo po ang mga mata mo, ang hirap mamuhay dito sa pinas. Tama nga si Sir Hyden na puro politika ang nangyayari sa pinas. Ako gusto ko man maisulong ang ating bansa sa kaunlaran di parin mangyayari sa dahil daming kamay nakapwesto sa kaban ng taong bayan. Hanggang di maresolusyanan yan di talaga tayo uunlad. Mga showbiz personalities, family dynasties, at mga dating crownies ginagawang negosyo ang pagiging government officials. sa dami dami ng problem sa bansa na di mo alam kung may solusyon ba, mas mabuting umalis nalang sa ibang bansa para may mapakain ako sa mga anak at apo ko na darating.

  5. Here is an example of a useless subject that was rammed down the throats of our generation. Once upon a time, we students in college were required to take a total of 12 units of Spanish for 4 agonizing semesters. We just had to grin and bear it just as we will do with that bright idea of the K-12 program. Did Spanish help me to land a good job? Maybe if I sought a job of flight steward, or an interpreter or any in the foreign service. Thank goodness the law was repealed several years ago and the current crop of students no longer have to suffer. But wait a minute! we still have so many college subjects that wont help in any way land a good job or make us world class workers.

    1. @RF

      I’ve got a feeling that you still have some subjects that you want to be removed from the college curriculum.

      To tell you my honest opinion, I just can’t go against your opinion about Spanish subject as a requirement in college education.

      How I wish you’re telling us that instead of Spanish, why not Chinese or Korean?

      1. Nothing stops you from learning Korean or Chinese. Or Japanese. Or Spanish.

        Or French if you want to migrate to Canada (before sneaking into the US 😉 ).

        Comes down to what you want to achieve in life and how far you want to go. Where you want to end up.

  6. Nukes. I love nukes! They’re part of nature because they use a basic part of nature, the atom.

    –>One thing we can do this very minute that can help our country is to go against this “defeated” way of thinking that tells us “You can’t do that because… you’re poor, you were born to a big family, you went to public school, you didn’t go to college, etcetera…”<–

    This is the kind of attitude that leads to, or is brought about by, laziness.

    Perhaps Filipinos so love their primitivist nature that they are are against modernizing the Philippines. Not realizing that being modern brings more comfort. I mean, even the squatters have TVs in their homes.

  7. @proud pinoy
    you sound like a religious nut who has neither done, nor achieved anything.
    go and play with yourself in the church.
    don’t waste the time of your betters.
    empty vessels and all that.
    are you really that stupid or just pretending

    1. Libertas,

      Bakit mo naman ginagawang personalan ito?

      Kung hindi ka tutol sa sinasabi ko, ipaliwanag mo ang iyong iniisip at talunin mo ang aking mga argumento.

      Diba sabi ni benign0: “ang pikon talo”

  8. Can please ignore these stupid rants from “Proud Pinoy” questioning commentators’ patriotism and loyalty? The discussion is turning into another shouting match on a completely irrelevant topic. It isn’t fair to the author.

  9. Can we please ignore these stupid rants from “Proud Pinoy” questioning commentators’ patriotism and loyalty? The discussion is turning into another shouting match on a completely irrelevant topic. It isn’t fair to the author.

    1. I always do this because because he is also the same person who made this post. In reality, he just wants to make fun. Nothing else.

      “Well I was using old spoof nicks all the time. So old folks like you, benign0, Toro, etc knew all along what was up.

      I am still flabbergasted why so many Pinoys don’t appreciate satire and sarcasm. Sometimes you can make a point more devastatingly effective that way.

      Oh well, back to life. Until the next Philippine catastrophe. Have fun guys. The Philippines will remain a shit hole and there is only one solution: GET THE F*** OUT.

      Peace.”

    2. @ Johnny S

      Visitors are the key to any websites survival. Look at “Proud Pinoy” as a customer no matter what his comments are. Bloggers are tasked to respond to comments and opinions relevant to their subject no matter what language is used.

      Some bloggers, this author particularly, don’t seem to understand that. Websites, after all are relevant only if they talk their talk. It is all about where GRP is in the Alexa Ranking.

      1. When did congress pass a law that mandates a response to a blog post or commentary? And since when — following your analogy — did it become illegal to turn away or refuse service to a customer who is disruptive?

        Blurting out things from the lunatic fringe in a discussion does not constitute a free exchange of ideas. It muddles the issue and buries the intent of the debate. It isn’t analysis; it is just noise. Like postulating inane conspiracy theories about the world financial sector that can never be proven.

        Worse, it is not only disingenuous, it smacks of a pathological need to be the center of attention. That is the epitome of KSP.

        1. @ Johnny S

          Call it rant, call it lunatic, call it noise, call it KSP, the fact of the matter is @ “Proud Pinoy” is not in violation of the comments policy of this website and as such should be treated as a customer just like you.

          Where “Proud Pinoy” came from and what he stands for is not your problem. Your problem is, how do you stand up in regards to his point of view.

        2. LA702,

          Now I’m required to “stand up in regards to his point of view.” I have never prevented “Proud Pinoy” from posting their skewed views on GRP. I am asking that the discussion refrain from going off on a tangent far removed from the post’s topic. THAT IS MY RESPONSE. These interjections from “Proud Pinoy” aren’t satire or sarcasm. They are far from engaging. They’re just plain silly. They do not even qualify as sensible “arguments.”

          And now that we have have talked this thing to death and beyond, this exchange still doesn’t touch on the topic of this post which was a call to dream and aspire to greater things and have the wherewithal to follow through.

        3. I’d just like to highlight this exchanges of comments –

          Fro J. Saint –

          “Can we please ignore these stupid rants from “Proud Pinoy” questioning commentators’ patriotism and loyalty? The discussion is turning into another shouting match on a completely irrelevant topic. It isn’t fair to the author.”

          From LA –

          “Visitors are the key to any websites survival. Look at “Proud Pinoy” as a customer no matter what his comments are. Bloggers are tasked to respond to comments and opinions relevant to their subject no matter what language is used.”

          From J. Saint –

          “When did congress pass a law that mandates a response to a blog post or commentary? And since when — following your analogy — did it become illegal to turn away or refuse service to a customer who is disruptive?

          Blurting out things from the lunatic fringe in a discussion does not constitute a free exchange of ideas. It muddles the issue and buries the intent of the debate. It isn’t analysis; it is just noise. Like postulating inane conspiracy theories about the world financial sector that can never be proven”

          From LA –

          “Call it rant, call it lunatic, call it noise, call it KSP, the fact of the matter is @ “Proud Pinoy” is not in violation of the comments policy of this website and as such should be treated as a customer just like you.

          Where “Proud Pinoy” came from and what he stands for is not your problem. Your problem is, how do you stand up in regards to his point of view.”

          From J. Saint –

          “Now I’m required to “stand up in regards to his point of view.” I have never prevented “Proud Pinoy” from posting their skewed views on GRP. I am asking that the discussion refrain from going off on a tangent far removed from the post’s topic. THAT IS MY RESPONSE. These interjections from “Proud Pinoy” aren’t satire or sarcasm. They are far from engaging. They’re just plain silly. They do not even qualify as sensible “arguments.”

          From my stand point, the key phrases –

          “…stupid rants from “Proud Pinoy” questioning commentators’ patriotism and loyalty?”

          (Me? I outrightly label the commenter an idiot or stupid. Whatever label to show my intense disgust to the dishonesties and lies of a commenter. Pinoy is just an ignorant and clueless commenter.)

          “Visitors are the key to any websites survival. Look at “Proud Pinoy” as a customer no matter what his comments are.”

          (Some bloggers don’t have a commenting board. They just want to express their thought.)

          For the rest of the exchanges of comments, I’m more inclined to side with LA.

      2. Johnny,

        Remember, benign0 and antipinoys are considered “noise” in some blogs and thus they are censored.

        Also, the Hacienda Conspiracy theory is considered truth among the Get Real / Anti-Pinoy crowd while it is simply “garbage noise” in many other blogs.

        You might think that global market manipulation is a “conspiracy” but not to Billionaires like Kyle Bass (who made a killing betting against CDO’s) or James Turk.

        What is true to you may not be true for others just like having an I-Phone is seen as a personal weakness by certain hedge fund managers.

        See you at Starbucks 🙂

        1. Not “noise.” The “inconvenient truth.”

          There’s a difference between stories that can be proven with documentation that can back it up and speculation that passes for news. The whining indignation you hear from the intolerant P-noy lovers’ brigade that comes from someone having a dissenting opinion arises from the fact that they cannot stomach being challenged with an alternative view. It is rare that they offer factual evidence to prove their point; most of the time they use emotional statements — like appeals to patriotism and “utang na loob” — to convince their audience.

          And the conspiracy theory that I alluded to was not about “market manipulation” or even insider trading. LA702 has previously posted that the financial crisis was the result of machinations of Jewish bankers to control the destiny (and money) of mankind. Aside from being unsubstantiated, it exudes a racist bent. This was exactly the kind of reasoning behind the Protocols of Zion and the anti-Semitic persecution of the early 20th century.

          The fact that Kyle Bass benefited from the sub-prime mortgage crisis in transactions similar to shorting the bonds suggests he may have engaged in insider trading. It does not imply a worldwide conspiracy to defraud depositors with Citibank.

          Speaking of which, are you aware that Citibank has set a precedent for failing and pleading for and getting government bailouts? The preferential treatment goes back to the Clinton administration. Citigroup’s Robert Rubin was US Treasury Secretary under Bill Clinton. Previously he worked for Goldman-Sachs. He presided over the world financial crisis in the 1990’s and managed the bailouts to American banks (including Citigroup). It is significant that the current US Treasury secretary Timothy Geithner (former president of the New York Federal Reserve) was Rubin’s protege. It seems that instead of properly policing the financial sector, they are more interested in the careers they might have after government service. That is the conspiracy worth looking into.

          The real story is that despite the presence of laws and regulatory agencies going back to the 1930’s, American regulators simply DID NOT DO THEIR JOB. Worse, they took advantage of the crisis to feather their beds for when they left their government positions. The worst you can say about Bass is that he gamed the system and got out before anyone else. The majority of the banks were just too greedy and got themselves in too deep when they knew full well it was an untenable situation.

          BTW, I prefer Serenitea. 😉

        2. We already know the real truth here while you done nothing but drinking too much Starbucks and listen too much BS media. Btw Starbucks is very overrated even though I drink one sometimes. I prefer milktea than that. You just love to waste your precious money at Starbucks everyday eh indio de trapo? Can’t you spend your hard-earned money for something more important?

        3. Johnny,

          Yes, again its the truth for you. All of it, part of it? Everyone has a little truth in them. I may not agree with benign0 all the time but I acknowledge that he right sometimes. Does that mean MLQ, Cocoy, Joe have zero truth in them even if they are totally at odds with benign0? No. I am wise enough to be unwilling to entirely dismiss anyone.

          I follow Kyle. You will be surprised on how hardcore this guy is, he preparing for total economic collapse. He has been on record saying that the next crash will cause THE NEXT GREAT WAR and even Charles Nenner (Goldman) predicts the same thing (using mathematics, reminds me of Asimov).

          Your perspective about regulators doing their job is naive. You have no concept on how ingrained corruption is in America. No conspiracies, just wealthy people bending the rules. Even in the 1930’s corruption was rampant.

          And before you lecture me about Citi, you should know that I am a high net worth individual in the United States very involved in investing.

          My position: I have put options all over the place (that means I am betting against the market)

          And yes, like Kyle, I am preparing for economic collapse. Like Kyle, I am heavily invested in Gold. Like Kyle, I have a long term supply of food. Like Kyle, I am a strong believer in the 2nd amendment.

          Good luck to you Johnny. You seem to be very sure of yourself. Let us see how things turn for you.

        4. @Conyo

          (No contest that your handle is Conyo and not coño.)

          Do you expect us to believe that you’re, as what you’re calling yourself, a high net worth individual in the United States very involved in investing?

          How about giving us your true name? For the sake of truth and not just truthiness.

          By that, my or our skepticism will be settled.

          Don’t you know that Penoy still owed me USD 2M he lost in a gun shooting contest with me?

          As for your –

          “And yes, like Kyle, I am preparing for economic collapse. Like Kyle, I am heavily invested in Gold. Like Kyle, I have a long term supply of food. Like Kyle, I am a strong believer in the 2nd amendment.”

          And perhaps you have also your underground shelter in preparation for imminent doomsday?

          What economic collapse are you talking about? A worldwide one?

          Not unless you’re dishonest with your comment, at least provide us some data where we can check your claim.

          BTW, you have this comment –

          “Does that mean MLQ, Cocoy, Joe have zero truth in them even if they are totally at odds with benign0?”

          Who is the Joe you’re referring to?

          Is he the same Joe that up to now can’t refute my claim that he has a poor reading comprehension?

          Or the dishonest Joe America?

        5. Dude, why do you need to know a person’s real identity to believe what he/she is posting here? If you are not able to take and comment on the content here (whether posted by the authors of GRP or its commentors) at face value then there is no point in hanging around here or even reading the articles here at all. The currency here is ideas the credibility of which are derived from the consistency and logical rigour applied by the authors (whether GRP authors or commentors) over a long enough period of time to allow said credibility to become evident.

        6. And as a PS conyo,

          Good luck to you for your prediction. You seem to be very sure of yourself. Let us see how things turn for you.

          I hope you’re not going to eat your words.

        7. benigs,

          My apology if you see it that way.

          This conyo has a claim that can be only be verified if he will use his own name. I’m challenging him to prove his claim.

        8. Conyo,

          Are we seriously going to argue about a DISAGREEMENT on what constitutes corruption?

          Filipinos are Asians. We grew up with corruption. About the only thing we can be assured of that the Philippines receives high marks in is our level of corruption. Its the one thing we are proficient at and readily recognize. Did you ever think that the Securities and Exchange Commission and the financial regulations enacted in the 1930’s were conceived BECAUSE of the corruption prevalent at the time?

          Naïveté? Did you not understand my comment? Do you actually think the duplicity of Barack Obama and his team of frauds, crooks and cronies would be easily missed out of naïveté? The fact that Citigroup Chairman Robert Rubin (under Bill Clinton) and his protege Tim Geithner (under the Obama administration) both happened to be in charge of US Treasury when Citigroup secured its bailouts is very strong circumstantial evidence of corruption working at the highest levels of the US government. And that is just a glimpse of what the Obama administration wants to inflict on the American people.

          Is that why your “fortune” is in Citigroup? Because you are certain that no matter what happens to the economy you will be repaid by the US taxpayer? It makes sense you value your Second Amendment rights. If word got around you actively gamed the US financial system for personal gain at the expense of your neighbor’s 401K, it would be very tempting for the hungry guy at the corner who lost everything to take out his frustrations on you. What with your hoard of gold and all.

          And yes, it is about the “truth.” Facts that can be proven. Not speculation or generalizations that you would like to pass off as fact. Or some profound insight into the human condition. As with anything, the rule is that any “truth” you propound has to stand up to analysis. It has to withstand criticism. I will be the first one to defend your right to express your opinion. And I will also be one to acknowledge if I think the discussion has strayed from the original topic or if it is no longer an opinion but an incitement to something ugly and wrong.

          With regards to the world financial crisis — the fact is despite all their impressive ivy league credentials, a good portion of the blame rests squarely with Obama’s dysfunctional team of cronies who are every bit as disreputable as their 1930s and 1940s counterparts. The corruption stretches from power brokers like Rahm Emanuel to Michelle Obama, who always has her hand out, to the bungling wunderkind Tim Geithner (who caused TWO financial crashes) to a host of special interest groups and a ballooning horde of Washington lobbyists. The fact is, none of it was exactly intentional. That they wanted to remake the world of finance in their image is without question. The fact that their manipulation caused the collapse was something they did not want; they just wanted the money. But they certainly know how to take advantage of the crisis to allocate whatever money is left for themselves.

          BTW, neither you nor Kyle are the only doomsday preppers to predict an economic collapse. Although it sounds as if Kyle certainly contributed his fair share to making it happen sooner rather than later.

  10. My point with this piece is that, as a country, we don’t have goals set large enough and high enough to challenge our real intellectuals — and they’re not the numbnuts you see on TV or ones that become popular for all sorts of movements in social media.

    1. Paul,

      In the proper context, I believe the Philippines does have the right kind of people who dream big. And loom large. And possess the capacity to carry out the execution of those plans.

      It isn’t that we cannot dream but rather most “dreamers” are beaten down and frustrated by a (government) system that only looks after itself.

      Here’s a dream that complements faux_ph’s reclamation project: ecological re-engineering of the Pasig, Marikina and San Juan Rivers, the refurbishment of their estuaries and smaller-sized streams. If these are properly developed, Metropolitan Manila can equal the world’s greatest cities.

      We don’t even have to start from scratch. South Korea’s Four Rivers Restoration Project is hailed as a model of modern urban renewal. Like the restoration of Cheonggyecheon stream in Seoul, it was initiated by South Korea’s president, Lee Myung-bak. The project is used as a model/starting point in other countries for redeveloping blighted urban areas. The project has these objectives in mind: Alleviating water scarcity and flood control; restoration of the surrounding ecosystem; promoting cultural and leisure activities, and improving the overall quality of life in the region; and revitalizing the (local) economy. On this last objective alone, it makes sense to develop a transportation route that directly links Manila Bay with Laguna Bay for mass transit and cargo transport. The flood control objective is self-explanatory; no one wants to see a repeat of the Ketsana tragedy in 2009.

      1. I’ve heard a little about the Four Rivers Restoration Project, wonderful. Haven’t had time to look into it more, though.

        But I think part of the model was to hitch restoration to people’s need for livelihood and that’s part of what made it work.

        Siguro kung mas mataas ang presyo ng recycled goods, mas maraming papasok sa ganyang negosyo.

  11. Rather than reclamation, the use of nuclear energy, etc., other schemes need to be considered, especially those that involve adjusting to the environment.

  12. Where was the Perkins’ mansion on Cuarteles St.? Was it on the same whole vacant concrete-fenced block where the Cuarteles de Malate used to stand or the next block bounded by Cuarteles and Salas? I desire to have the right details for my Flickr account describing the remnant flooring at the Cuarteles grounds which I might describe as its original foundation instead of the latter-built Perkins mansion. Many thanks!

  13. Proud Pinoy,

    Tigilan mo ako sa iyong “walang utang na loob” dahil iyan ang pinaka ka dahilan kung bakit tayo hindi umuunlad.

  14. The development of the Philippines do not depend on the government but rather on the governed…each individual Filipino. Regardless where Filipinos are, they can contribute to the development of the Philippine society by doing the right thing/the right action.

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