3 things holding the Philippines back from becoming another Singapore

As Singapore celebrated its 50th year of independence, one cannot help but reflect on what could have been for our own country, the Philippines. After all, Singapore and the Philippines started as equals back in the 1960s. Records even suggests that the Philippines was the most developed country in the region during that time due to America’s assistance in recovery after the second world war. But alas, the Philippines has been left in the dust by the rest of its neighbors as each country learned to evolve through the times.

Intelligent and efficient Singapore: The country the Philippines could have been.
Intelligent and efficient Singapore: The country the Philippines could have been.
Similar to a marathon runner ahead in the race but who stumbled and suffered a spectacular fall, it has been hard for the Philippines to pick herself up. It’s become even more difficult after the country fell in the hands of the oligarchs who replaced former President Ferdinand Marcos after his ouster in 1986. Meanwhile, from what was described as a formerly sleepy port, Singapore had grown to become a global finance and trade hub. The legacy of Singapore’s founder former Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew continues to guide the country’s multicultural society even after his death.

Some say it is not fair to compare Singapore to the Philippines because Singapore is smaller. The country is just 716 square kilometers, just a little bigger than Metro Manila. But like with most things, it’s not the size of something that matters but what you do with it that counts. Singaporeans obviously did a lot with their space in spite of the scarce resources within it. Just to give you an idea of what they had to deal with, the country had been relying on imported water from Malaysia for most of its water needs. In recent years, “the city-state has made its gutters, drains and rivulets a vast basin to catch rainfall” in addition to increasing the size of its water catchment areas just to ease their dependence on Malaysia. It is evident that instead of holding them back, lack of resources has certainly made Singaporeans become more resourceful.

Accommodating Singapore’s booming population seems like a welcome challenge for them as well. To manage the country’s growth, which is projected to reach six million people in the next two decades, the Singapore government has teamed up with experts from the “Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to devise ways to manage its expansion — knowledge it plans to export to other cities.” The whole point is “to study how cities work and how they can work better.” Those who have been to Singapore will know how efficient things are run in the country.

If only the Philippines can learn from Singapore and apply these to the task of managing its people and resources, the country can also join the rest of its neighbors at the finish line. Despite the Philippines’ vast resources and abundant talent pool, the country cannot seem to get its act together. Let us look at the reasons why:

1. Weak law enforcement leads to lack of discipline.

Lee Kuan Yew’s advice was: Filipinos need to develop discipline more than democracy. He was right. Democracy only works when the majority are informed and educated. That’s not the case in the Philippines. It seems there is this misguided notion among Filipinos that democracy means freedom to do whatever they want including breaking the law.

The reason why Filipinos lack discipline is because law enforcement agencies including the police and justice department do not or cannot do their jobs properly. To help them with their jobs, they have to realize that they are dealing with mostly ignorant and arrogant people so they need to apply zero tolerance and effect strict enforcement of the law. Otherwise, the people will not learn to obey the rules. Perhaps it would be best if members of the Philippine law enforcement agencies treat the populace like children who need guidance. That’s how it’s done in Singapore until now anyway. No chewing gum, anyone?

Everyday there is chaos on major roads in the Philippines due to lack of discipline. One wonders what the traffic enforcers are doing to fix the problem. Nothing, it seems. Every day there is someone throwing garbage in the river and someone building a new shack illegally on private and public lands. One wonders what the police and local government agencies are doing to nip the problem in the bud. These are just some of the violations that are tolerated in the country. Some say this is so because politicians patronize the masses to get their votes. Which brings us to the next item.

2. Patronage politics has perverted democracy.

It’s also called padrino system. This is the reason why law enforcement is weak in the Philippines. The law is not applied equally to everyone. This is evident in the way incumbent public servants use selective justice in prosecuting criminals. This is why a lot of people think it’s okay to do the crime. If you need further convincing, just look at how President BS Aquino treats his allies. When people see others get away with violating the law just by being friends with those in power or by bribing those in power, their natural tendency is to emulate or copy what they see. A lot of the elite members of Philippine society do this to get away with violating the law. Those from the lower class just copy the behavior of those from the upper class.

Mismanagement and mediocrity ruined the Philippines.
Mismanagement and mediocrity ruined the Philippines.
This is precisely the reason why it is best to first ask the elite members of Philippine society to change instead of asking or expecting the masses to change.

As long as patronage politics is strong in the Philippines, the country will not progress. You can even see patronage politics on the road. The buses that block the road on EDSA and cause major traffic jams are operated by the elites and, unfortunately, these bus operators are not doing anything to discipline their drivers and neither are the traffic enforcers doing anything drastic since they more than likely get a cut from the bus operators.

3. Anti-intellectual attitudes discourage critical debate.

An anti-intellectual attitude in the Philippines is a problem that has plagued the country since the mid 1980s. The problem started when Filipinos allowed a “reluctant” housewife with no expertise in running a government to become the President of the Republic. Instead of promoting excellence, former President Cory Aquino promoted mediocrity. The society also became increasingly emotional and vindictive.

One just needs to look at the current crop of public servants today and one will realize why the country is run like hell. Instead of voting for experts and professionals or at least someone with more experience and vision, Filipinos love putting a lot of celebrities and popular personalities and their relatives in powerful positions in government.

It seems as though Filipinos are allergic to people who have knowledge and expertise in solving the country’s problems so they would rather go for someone who they can relate with even when nothing is being done to solve the country’s woes. No wonder the country’s public transport system is almost in ruin.

It’s only in the Philippines where intellectuals are ostracised. When you explain something that is deemed too complicated for the average person, they will simply dismiss you with “eh di wow!” or similar exasperated expressions in a condescending manner. It is the reason why some intellectuals would rather go with the flow than risk being shamed for using their heads.

As long as intellectuals and experts are not in charge of the Philippines, the country will not reach the same status as Singapore.

The above reasons are what is holding the Philippines back from reaching First World status. They all pertain to Filipino cultural traits. There are some who would say that the country’s flawed system is what’s holding the country back and suggest that perhaps a parliamentary form of government will help foster intellectual discourse. However, the system is only as good as the people. There is very little chance a good system will be designed by a society that is lacking in discipline, is anti-intellectual, and is imprisoned by patronage politics. Sadly, such a society is guaranteed to either remain stagnant or become worse in the decades to come.

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Post Author: Ilda

In life, things are not always what they seem.

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297 Comments on "3 things holding the Philippines back from becoming another Singapore"

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DR
Guest

Nice article. Even if the three items were fixed I doubt the philippines would make first world status. How about removing the idiotic foreign investment restrictions and ownership rules.

Sean Akizuki
Guest

Hi Ilda! I still have to admit there are some clowns at Get Real Philippines group that keep calling Singapore as “Everybody’s favorite tyranny.” which is for backward thinkers.

Anyway, you may want to take a look at these entries I made:

The Philippines’ Problem of Anti-Intellectualism Prevailing in Society!

Philippine Democracy Is Currently A Government Of Stupid People, By Stupid People And For Stupid People!

Failipinos Can’t Expect to Bring Progress in Their Country IF They Refuse to Follow Even Simple Guidelines!

I hope you enjoy reading them and feel free to comment.

John Weath
Guest
Hi Sean I agree with you The stupid people who are in politics and stupid people who voted them in government position,also greedy very rich business man stupid people help this politician to acquired gov.position and Intellectual people are being ignored like Daniel Dingle who invented a car using water converted to Hydrogen fuel and many genius Filipino that never given a chance or support from the Philippine gov,because there self interest comes first before others. As commented by Korean people there country become successful because all of Korean people honestly love there country.Specially the people who have the highest… Read more »
Sean Akizuki
Guest

What is more hypocritical is this…

Ever noticed they mock the Pinoy intellectuals then… when the Pinoy intellectual succeeds, they do their free riding? It’s so annoying.

Then if a Filipino who is Chinese by blood wins abroad, a lot of Filipinos want to discredit him/her.

I really hate what the country has become.

Not a Typical Filipino
Guest
Not a Typical Filipino

I can’t help but to agree on how much this country is slowly becoming a place where people who are not bible-thumping demagogues, basketballtards, Yellow Propaganda junkies, squatter minded fools and emotional bigots are becoming unwelcome and unwanted. This makes me want to cry bitter tears whenever I think about it and feel incredibly desperate about our Philippines, once a nation filled with hopes, intelligence and true pride become a den of oligarchs, hypocrisy and unwarranted pride.

Gordon McPhail
Guest

You can fix a broken car, you can fix a broken bridge, you can mend a broken arm you can fix a broken mind. You cannot fix Stupid. Sorry

Aeta
Guest

And Filipinos’stupid delusions of how great of a people they are is beyond fixing. What the Filipinos need is a complete overhaul of their cultural values, attitude, and way of life—which will require a complete lobotomy.

jordan arcilla
Guest

hi! im filipino and i learn a lot from this post thank you someday i will be the one who handles the fuckin’ philippines.

Oly Serafica
Guest

I shared your mind-provoking articles in my timeline. Thanks.

Robert Haighton
Member
Great article. I like this line especially: “However, the system is only as good as the people.” = the weakest link in the system is/are the mediocre people. We – the Netherlands – also have the same traffic problems and we are trying to solve them. What are the cases of our traffic problems? We are occupying the road at the same time bec we all want to get at work at the same time. Possible solutions: 1) those who can work from home should be encouraged to do so. 2) flexible work hours. Most of us work probably 8… Read more »
CCC
Guest

Exactly! and these will also give a chance for employees to process their needed government papers before or after their shift, because there will be longer office hours… come to think of the 8-5 routine is outdated because it applies back then when the population is not a problem. But now, i think we need to adjust…. can the congress have a social media account so that they could read about law suggestions… they could use their belly fat for something right?

Robert Haighton
Member

And all those others who shouldnt be occupying the roads at rush hour should pay a heavy congestion fee. People that insist doing their shoppings (groceries and going to malls) by car/bus/jeepney/MTR between 8AM and 10AM & between 3PM and 7PM should pay that congestion fee.

I am aware that my suggestions are not solving all traffic problems, but it may be a start. Besides those mentioned by Ilda.

cris webb
Guest

they once lamented how can w cut the number of buses on edsa. Simple really make a cut of 50 per cent by making them all double deckers. the same goes for the lrt and mrt make them double deckers. done in many countries in the world trouble here is nobody will listen to good advice

Janice Ward
Guest

I have an easy suggestion! Why aren’t you off your butt and doing anything about the issues the Philippines has? Instead we are all on this message board doing not but complaining. What the Philippines needs is someone with huge hairy balls!? Someone be the do’er and not just the thinker or complainer!!

marius
Guest
I initially found it odd that Filipinos seem to spend so much time travelling hither and yon. Where the hell are they all going? Most of them are supposedly unemployed. Then I had the misfortune to encounter the Philippine bureaucracy, AKA the Employment Agency for The Slightly Retarded. In functioning countries, you interact with the government via the internet, a phone call, or form to fill in, or at worst a single trip to some ugly office. In the Philippines… oh my. You go this window. Then you pay a fee and get send to some other office. Then you… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Marius,
I dont have to leave my house to pay a/any bill. I can pay by mobile phone or by internet banking from any computer.
To renew my passport/drivers license, I still have to go to City Hall (in person).

Johnny Cruz
Guest
We’re getting there … to pay my water, electric, cable, DSL and mobile phone bills, I can do it online or just go down to the 7-11 at the ground floor of my office building. I work from home in the morning and go to my office after lunch and leave for home slightly after rush hour. During my car coded day, I usually opt to walk home which is just 2.4 kms. away instead of taking a cab and bypass the more unfortunate car riders stuck in gridlock. In my line of work, I deal a lot with various… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Johnny, just to add. if one has a job here then having a bank account is a requirement. Employers dont issue cheques anymore with which you have to go to a bank to cash that cheque (too dangerous of getting robbed). Your wage/salary will be transfered to your bank account once per month (approx at the 21st of each month). Almost all purchases are done by using a bankcard (direct debit card) (punch your pincode of the bankcard, check the amount, punch OK and purchase is paid). Hence almost no need to walk around with cash money in your wallet.… Read more »
Sukie
Guest

I live in Melbourne Australia.
One morning, I went to have my Driver’s License renewed. I was 4th in line at 8:15 am, 15 minutes before the office opened.
8:40 am I was leaving the license office with my new Driver’s License. I wish my beloved Mother Land is as efficient as that.

Robert Haighton
Member
Sukie, Literally, I cant wait for my DL and passport because they have to be ‘manufactured/processed’. That process takes time and is done centralized. The ‘waiting’ time is about 4 or 5 days. And by the time one’s current DL or passport expires, one receives a letter (by snail mail) from City Hall that its about time to renew it. So far, I never heard any complaints about the ‘waiting’ time of 4 or 5 days. And even when passports and DLs are actually made/manufactured by City Hall, I dont think it will go as fast as in your city/country… Read more »
marius
Guest

Just a bit of hyperbole there Robert. I dunno about Manila, but out in the provinces you have to physically go to the water co-operative to pay the bill (most people don’t have bank accounts anyway, so online service would be futile).

I was referring mainly to all the silly hoops that the average citizen must jump through to do anything more complex than paying a bill. To start or run the simplest business, for example, you need to employ a full-time accountant to deal with the mountain of foolish regulations and paperwork.

Robert Haighton
Member

I think I started (earlier on) to understand that most (or a lot) Filipinos dont have a bank account.

My local water co-operative (we just say: the water company) will send me straight back home. We are about to go to a penny-less society/nation (= an empty wallet/purse). I think we can do everything with just 1 bank card.

Robert Haighton
Member

Marius,
Are you implying that all those 10 million OFWs also have no bank acount?
If yes then how do they transfer money back home? Using Western Union or Money Gram?

marius
Guest
Robert: I think you misunderstand me. I was referring specifically to the Philippines, not Europe – where, of course, the bureaucracy functions very well (although we pay heavily for that privilege, but that’s another story). This was in the context of the traffic problems: I’ve had many experiences in the Philippines that require me to make a physical trip – often several trips – to deal with some trivial issue. It wouldn’t surprise me if the OFWs bring their poor financial skills with them, including their mistrust of banks (which is well-founded in the Philippines). You can send cash via… Read more »
anon
Guest

NBI’s previous pseudo-online application

1. Go the their website and fill out form.

2. Print said form.

3. Go to the nearest NBI branch…. wait what?… and join the long lines of walk in applicants.

4. Failed to make it to the minimum daily number/quota? Tough luck. Go back next. At 2:00 AM. Fk yes, 2AM.

5. Complain about the goddamn system? Get told that a TRUE FILIPINO sucks it up and is open to sacrifices. Or run for president.

FKKIN PINOY RESILIENCY.

/rant

marius
Guest

My point exactly.

I get the impression all of this is deliberate. The government WANTS to fuck up the economy. They WANT everyone to waste their time standing in queues, or waste their money on “professionals” who navigate the system for them.

If the people who make the rules can hobble everyone except themselves with ridiculous regulations, then they can establish monopolies and rule the country. And that’s precisely what they’ve done.

andrew
Guest

that happened to me anon. i applied online and guess what i waited in line the whole day. i wasn’t able to go to work that day. a waste of time. mothaf@ckaz! XD

CCC
Guest
To be fair with the nbi online system, i applied for nbi clearance way back 2013, thanks to google i discovered this online application. After the online process and payment, i went to get the clearance in robinson’s cainta and spent only 15 minutes. I was scared because the people in line is throwing me this murderous look probably because they were there for hours but here i am just spending 15 minutes and already got the clearance. It’s a good thing the security guard kind enough to explain it to them. Im not sure about the current process though… Read more »
Mario Arocha
Guest

You’re right! Unfortunately, most of these people don’t have the technical know-how to use the NET or don’t have access to them and lastly, many Philippine government offices,especially local government offices don’t have websites or if they do have, they don’t have features that would allow transactions on the NET.

Biffa Bacon
Guest
Very excellent point…years ago I helped a young lad emigrate to the u.s.from the phils. so he could be reunited with his mom after being separated for 10 or so yrs..you think what you went thru was difficult?? And last yr.I was married in the phils….the beaurocratic bullshit was never ending,go here for this,go here for that…oh wait,you didnt do this,you need to go back to where you just were to to get this signed by the chief dildo in the back office….and of course he is some pompous asshole with his hair all coiffed, you’ve just interrupted playing a… Read more »
CCC
Guest
Sometimes i’m guilty of dumbing down myself just not to be ostracize. I have no patience for small talks and i love intellectual conversation, but whenever i try to talk to my officemate, they will say things like, ‘eh di wow’ , ‘bakit di ka magsenador andami mo alam’ or masyado ka naman teh seryoso and they will laugh, which i got tired off an just shut myself up. Then they will fill their mouth with talking about how to be more beautiful or how to whiter or about the most recent love team to conquer the brainless media. So… Read more »
saboteur
Guest
There just your typical, annoying co-workers who only care to earn a peso for a living. I bet they made you not go to work just to meet them. A good co-worker not only help each other but hang out with each other after work sharing pains and accomplishment from the works created. I used to work on a site where we appreciated the camaraderie and that was because I worked at the military site. And we enjoyed playing PS3 and Wii during our break, played basketball under the sun during noon, and competed by NFL Fantasy league trying to… Read more »
Mumbay
Guest

How about these phrases?

“Ang dami mong sinabi!”
“Ang lalim ng Tagalog mo.”

Go RICO
Guest
GREAT ARTICLE, IIda. Well done!!! Indeed, Philippines could have and SHOULD have been equal to Singapore all along. The Philippines has always had abundant valuable assets that Singapore did not except one. Leadership!!!. Like you, I’m sure Yew’s observation that Philippines lacked discipline meant the general lack of respect for or enforcement of laws. But noting LKY’s mental dexterity and complex thought process, he implied our country was lazy in the Affairs of State and lax in delivering goods, services, justice and equal opportunity for our people. These things would be hard to say diplomatically and publicly.
Vincent
Member

“These things would be hard to say diplomatically and publicly” – this line made me laugh because I suddenly imagined LKY is declared persona non grata in RP.

Go RICO
Guest

Thanks, Vincent. Freedom of Speech is lost when you become Head of State. LKY was a Super Statesman.

ron
Guest

should have hired him as president after he retired from public office in singapore. lol. just wishful thinking. but then again, what if?

Go RICO
Guest

Cielito Flores Habito, PhD

Biffa Bacon
Guest

It is blatantly obvious to most outside observers that the Philippines and filipinos lack discipline on many fronts…what kind of people litter their once beautiful beaches,waterways and streets with trash? What kind of people keep having children that they cannot feed,house and educate properly? What kind of people have absolutely no thought of the future?What kind of people allow their ‘elected’ officials to literally rob their constituents blind?What kind of people are afraid to stand up and create change???? A weak,undisciplined people,thats who !!!

george
Guest
You make good points but omit the main reason . Your constitution prevents foreign owners from owning business in the Philippines( with the recent exception of import/export seat trade and any business that exports more than 70%? of its produce). The world bank points out that you have the greatest disincentives to foreign business of any “developed” Asian country. Your public utilities cannot be owned by foreigners – which would not matter if there were not so many blackouts , good water supply and clean sewage. You even prevent joint development of resources in the South china seas as your… Read more »
marius
Guest
Totally agree, george. No country can stand alone – only the arrogant and the mad (like NK) think that “self-sufficiency” is possible or desirable. Even the US recognises that it must trade with the rest of the world to survive. The attempt to exclude foreigners from business has not only hobbled the entire country with stupid laws, it doesn’t even work. There are plenty of ways for a big company with money and lawyers to skirt around the law. The food supply, for example, is run by international conglomerates: all of that awful junk food that people subsist on is… Read more »
george
Guest

yes but they are either franchises (like MacDonald’s ) or have a nominal office in the Philippines. A bit like how Starbucks avoids paying tax in Britain as its office is in Dublin where tax is much lower and royalties etc. go them. You cannot do that for non service industries.

Go RICO
Guest
George and Marius, you both raise excellent points. The prohibitive 60% ownership is a deal killer for most foreign companies. Even if a company decided to take the risk of a minority position, the fundamentals are either missing or unaffordable. The highest rates for the poorest power service in Asia, virtually no clean water system, substandard sewage and sanitation infrastructure and a marginal highway network in a market where 80% of the families earn less than US 7,000 per year, paints a very bleak picture. Two questions; 1) “If the Philippines doesn’t invest in the Philippines, why would a foreigner… Read more »
Pogi
Guest
I completely agree with the article and the comments. Being in SQ most of the time I see & feel the huge differences: from the absence of guards’ sticking of BBQ sticks “kalikot-izing” all belongings of mall entrants, to the deafening silence of non-horn blowers, to the disciplined queuing of all in areas where needed, to doing most of your govt transactions online free from “mga buwayang hayok” with wide open palms and/or table drawers to where “graft-ies or corrupt-ness” must be dropped, to sincere caring & concern for the PRs, citizens most particularly the seniors up to allowing my… Read more »
marius
Guest
Ilda, another awesome article. When are you running for president? 🙂 >> Perhaps it would be best if members of the Philippine law enforcement agencies treat the populace like children who need guidance. I have exactly the same feeling. So many of the people I meet seem to operate on the mental level of children. I can’t help wondering if decades of enforced mediocrity, slavery to the oligarchs, and a laughable education system has done something to the average IQ. Singapore must have been in a similar position, and regimenting the mouthbreathers not only improved public order, it improved general… Read more »
David
Guest

You don’t mention that the biggest export of the Phillipines is it’s people. You are exporting The very people who want to work hard to get ahead. You need these people to move your country forward.

anon
Guest

Remittances mostly just end up on mall owners’ hands. Not surprising when considering that 15th and 30th of the month are major news item on tv.

PAYDAY PAYDAY PAYDAY RUSH HOUR EVERYONE TO THE MALLS.

How the fuck can you save on a society designed to milk every last cent out of the common man? Social drinking after work hours/payday, fiestas everywhere, every damned holiday/special events like Valentines/Mother’s Day commercialized to death.

marius
Guest

The problems started when the Americans left. They were the people running the infrastructure. It was basically Marcos who kicked them out (or made it impossible for them to continue operating).

Cory just carried on with more of the same. I’m really quite surprised that people think there was any discontinuity when Marcos left. Even some of the same faces are still in positions of power.

Add
Guest

Agree with this one thousand percent. Thing is towards the end, things with DC got personal. DC was getting irritated with Imelda showing up in parties uninvited. On other hand, Imelda was always pissed when she was not invited to important parties.

Add
Guest

This was in reply to Marius comment just preceeding

Add
Guest

Oh, what is going on. I am replying to a comment but it is jumping out of the box being replied to.

Go RICO
Guest

Hehehehe, yes, Add, Imelda was “Special”

Maria
Guest

Imelda is special(?!?) Please read or research some more. Marcos or Cojuangco/Aquino are all the same. What we need a clone of Lew Kuan Yew , a benevolent leader.

Go RICO
Guest
Hi, Marius. Thanks for saying that. I’m an American, and it’s good to hear some good comments from time to time. As an Professional Expat, we get to hear some interesting opinions of the ways America works. I was having dinner in Cyprus a few years ago, and a group of young people asked if they could interview me. There first question was, “If Cyprus declares war on US on Tuesday, and Cyprus surrenders on Wednesday, will US come and build us some new highways on Thursday?” I assured them, yes, that seemed logical. Be assured, America will always be… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Rico,

Is there also something like an amateur expat? Or are there only professional expats?

Go RICO
Guest

Hey, Robert. I suppose there is a difference, but the “Professional Expat” is a term my team gave me since I’ve only been in the US 10 days in 8 years

I chose to work all the “Garden Spots” from Mongolia to Morocco with holidays in Gaza and Somalia.

My people are are too valuable to risk and I’m expendable, so . . . . .

Robert Haighton
Member

Rico, I was a bit teasing you.

Many Filipinos also state they are a professional teacher (as if there are also amateur teachers). In my country you are a teacher or you are not a teacher (maybe you are an engineer. But that person is not a professional engineer).

However, you can be a professional soccer player (its your job, its your profession) or you can be an amateur soccer player (now its a hobby, and not paid and not a profession).

Go RICO
Guest

Understood, Robert. Based on the criterion, I travel and live abroad as a part of a career instead of leisure, so I suppose Professional would apply.

marius
Guest

There are indeed amateur teachers. How do you think the Philippines achieves such appallingly low academic standards?

Robert Haighton
Member

Marius,
I thought that every teacher is registered with the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC).

On the card of my ex it indeed says “professional teacher”. Very strange.

So from today I will state my job title as professional garbage collector (as if there are also amateur garbage collectors).

The Philippines is a funny country.

andrew
Guest

lol!
it may have something to do with our poor command of the English language. i also commit mistakes sometimes. so I need to do some proof reading first. I don’t even know if my grammar is correct in this paragraph. 😀

Go RICO
Guest

No worries, Andrew!!! The fun part about the English Language is, it’s very “Fluid”. You just start speaking, if the listener has questions, you re-phrase for better specificity.

English can be tailored into Technical/Scientific Language, Legal / Business Language, Military / Geopolitical / Diplomatic Language, etc.

Your language skills are fine, Andrew. We all learn something new everyday.

andrew
Guest

lol!
it may have something to do with our poor command of the English language. i also commit mistakes sometimes. so I need to do some proof reading first. I don’t even know if my grammar is correct in this paragraph. 😀

Robert Haighton
Member

Andrew,
As long as you dont say you are a professional engineer but instead tell me you are an engineer, then you are fine.

For me personally (and also in my country) it sounds and looks weird (and yes almost stupid) when one says he/she is a professional engineer. As if he wants to proof something to be recognized/acknowledged as such.

In the hobby section of your resume (CV) you can state that you like to build clay bridges over imaginary rivers.

marius
Guest
Just to burst your bubble, Rico, I didn’t mean exclusively Americans 😉 However, it is a fact that most of the stuff that worked back in the day – power, roads, etc – were funded by the US and operated by American companies. It really annoys me when Filipinos rave about Marcos being “the best president we ever had”. I can only assume their history books don’t even MENTION the Americans, and the fact that they were almost single-handedly responsible for the Philippine infrastructure, while Marcos sat there claiming all the credit. As someone (george?) mentioned back there, the rampant… Read more »
WR
Guest
Indeed. It seems pinoys are obsessed with this concept of puritanical localism, or this idea that filipinos must use “pinoy only” products just so they could brag about their “pinoy only identity”; in other words, for nationalistic purposes. By the way have you seen these programmes? Churchill’s Traitors, NGC Megafactories BMW, NGC Two tales of China Sino Eagle Group What’s more telling in these programmes is that counties like Japan, Germany and China are willing to hire and include foreign workers, designers and engineers to improve the quality of their products and services and therefore their economy. By contrast, pinoys… Read more »
Add
Guest
This is super, super 5-star article. One trillion likes. 1. Not many know that Filipinos led by Dinah Santos were part of the urban planning of SG at the start. One feature of this was to convert all flood prone areas to parks and/or forest reserve – an idea that could hv helped PHL but nobody here wanted to listen Dinah. Talk of anti intellectualism. LKY was really a visionary, first one to think green, so SG is about greeneries. 2. When Changi airport was built, ppl were laughing why it was so big, but LKY was thinking 50 years… Read more »
Sick_Amore
Guest
Great article, Ilda! I hope the likes of this article are the ones going viral. Accurate analysis of the situation and problems that will kick off change and solutions from all the people involved. As to disciplining Filipinos, it should also be partnered with education. Like if a person is caught throwing garbage or urinating in public places, aside from being detained/jailed or paying fines, they should be given orientation or have them to watch documentaries in their detention room about laws involving their petty crime, it’s effect in our surroundings/nation and how can it be prevented and the results… Read more »
Danilo
Guest
We left Philippines 15 years ago, during the time i stayed in our country im fully aware what is happining in our society. Because i grew up in poverty-stricken family so i learned to value life.They time that i spent in our beloved country im just like other ordinary filipino that just following the system. But when i migrate and live to other countries i realized how so sick our society. Our ordinary people are bombarded with telenovelas and noon time shows that becomes the cultures and past time of our people. This TV shows becomes the issue of the… Read more »
marius
Guest
The DPWH comment made me smile. Near my farm they just completed a 4-meter-wide concrete road. It goes from nowhere, to nowhere. It starts on a dirt track, and ends at a river. There is no traffic on it apart from the occasional motorcycle or carabao (farm owners). In other words, it was a complete and total waste of money. Nothing wrong with building farm roads, of course; but all that’s needed (as in my home country) is a one-meter-wide strip of concrete with a 500kg axle rating. The DPWH could have concreted the entire track, all the way back… Read more »
Vincent
Member

@Marius: I wonder who designed that road you are talking about. I have a feeling I know him/them.

Not only that, how sure are we that the materials used in that project is what was specified in the design.

In fairness to the width, perhaps that can be compared to Add’s comment on Changi Airport’s size. But then again, was there really a study made to come up with that road width? Well, at least one road is prepared for… 200 years(?)

marius
Guest
I can only assume it was done for a single purpose: so that somebody could cream off a lot of the funding for it without anyone important noticing. It’s literally in the middle of nowhere. As for the width: most roads are designed for a 30-60 year lifespan. In that timeframe, gasoline vehicles will be obsolete. The reason it’s 4m wide is because EVERY road is 4m wide. A civil engineer I know told me that every road in the Philippines is built to a cookie-cutter recipe from American design specs, presumably because Filipinos just don’t have the ingenuity to… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest

Hehehe, cute story about your road, Vincent. Make a street sign and call it Vincents Expressway.

Erom Reven
Guest

Singapore had Lee Kuan Yew but the Philippines had Rizal. Therefore, the Philippines could have advanced and progressed earlier than Singapore or other neighboring countries in the region, couldn’t it?

If Rizal hardly had any impact to each and every Filipino, who would ever like Lee Kuan Yew?

Is it that the Filipino mentality really different from those of the others that when they’re advancing the Filipinos keep on regressing?

Go RICO
Guest

@SAMMY, I think you missed the message. There a 3 Points are Sub Topics. The words in between the Sub Topics is where the information is.

Ask your mommy to read it to you slowly.

mrericx
Guest
Our country will not be the same status as Singapore except in Davao City & you know why when you’ll go to that city. And if you think that Duterte will be the next LKY, you might be right however many of our people will not vote for him on 2016 due to in fact that Filipinos are culturally hard-headed, dumb, “mababaw na kaligayahan” & having a crab mentality. Unless if Duterte will invent a brainwashing device that could change the culture & attitude of the Filipinos from being ignorant, undisciplined & low morale into an almost a super race… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest
Hi, mrericx. You’re correct. Singapore is the game to beat, and Davao / Duterte is the closest comparison in the Philippines. Davao does prove that we can do it with the right leadership. IIdas Articles always make me stop and think. She made the point that Singapore was tiny, only 716 Sq KM. So how did LKY make it into an International Power House, while Philippines got stuck. So, I crunched some numbers; the results are interesting. PH has 18 Regions. Of those 18 Regions, only NCR is smaller in area than Singapore. The average area of the 18 Regions… Read more »
mrericx
Guest
I would like to make a comment on what you said Go Rico on this quote: “The good news is, Philippines can still develop all 18 Regions to Developed Nation Status within a few years, but we need to choose our leaders from a list “Best and Brightest”, not a menu of the “Rich and Famous Dynasties”.” On that quote that you’d said, Mr. Go Rico is very similar to what this countdown list about how our gov’t will learn on LKY especially on #1 spot: http://8list.ph/lee-kuan-yew-philippines/ A solution on that one is none other than giving a good education… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest

Thank you for the reply and comment, mrericx, and for understanding my point.

I understand that Philippines is uncomfortable about changing things, but the Politicians in Manila leave us no choice. They never deliver the progress they promise, so Filipinos will create our own progress and economy, and find new leaders to serve our interest.

mrericx
Guest

thanks again for another reply, Go Rico and I would like to share it to you again & I’d saw this one coming from the famous Mr. BOB ONG:

https://www.facebook.com/bobongpinoy/posts/10153367333612013

Read it and I was right about giving a good education to the BOBOTANTES in order to have a drastic change in our country.

Go RICO
Guest

You’re most welcome, mrericx, I enjoy the dialogue.

AGREED, we should always look for the “Best and Brightest” men and women to lead.

If we can find some more like Sen. Miriam Santiago, life really would be more fun in the Philippines!!!

63Hayden000777Toro
Guest

I do not believe, we even come close to Singapore. Our negative culture and character are now ingrained in our bones. They are in our DNA.

The average Filipino is, naturally stupid and naive…we have no discipline…

Only a full awakening of ourselves, and purging away those negative characters; can we become better people. This begins with our leaders.

Go RICO
Guest

Well said, Hayden!!! Negative Culture and Naive, maybe, but stupid? ABSOLUTELY NOT. Filipinos, in my opinion, are just exhausted from 50 years of failed leadership.

Change the leaders and inspire the people, there’s a lot of pent up energy here just waiting to go to accomplish

Nicholas
Guest
Nice article. There are tons of solutions that could solve traffic unfortunately instead of THINKING of Solutions they’d rather think how they’ll earn first. There are models out there that can be emulated take for example Bogota Columbia’s Transmilenio a Bus Rapid Transit system, imagine these buses act like MRT’s where 1 bus goes from North Edsa all the way to MOA without stopping and another bus stops every station. People from within the city get shuttled by smaller coaster like buses to the terminals. I believe yo get the point. Mass transit without huge infrastructure spendings. Take out the… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest

You’re on target, Nicholas. Technology is EVERYWHERE but this Government resists everything unless they get a piece.

If we can help get the Anti-Political Dynasty pushed through, we’ll see some changes. If not, cannot.

Vincent
Member
LKY, in his book, mentioned two things: 1. “Our greatest asset was the trust and confidence of the people” And he explained: “These we had earned by the fight we fight we put up in behalf of them against the communists and the Malay Ultras, our refusal to be browbeaten and cowed at a time when the police and the army were both in the hands of the central government.” Trust and confidence? I’m ready to trust a leader if I have a good reason to do so. Question: Who among our past leaders you can really can count on… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Vincent,
I get paid for 8 hrs per day but I do my work in 6. Not because I work hard but because I do my work efficiently and bec I am good at it. Remaining 2 hrs I work on other stuff mostly already for the next day or I go home early.

Go RICO
Guest

Correct, Vincent. Singapore is NOT paradise, but it’s pretty close.

I am convinced that if we can recruit good new leaders instead just voting from the short list of proven dummies and criminals, yes, Philippines can be Singapore and MORE!!

However, Singapore is a high stress society. When Philippines becomes clean and progressive like Singapore, I hope we keep the smiles and charming personality that Filipinos are famous for.

Kay
Guest

Not to mention that the local media is draining the brains of the masses. This leaves them with hearts overfilled with emotions without any brains to keep them in check.

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