Lack of thinking and arrogant attitudes are the Philippines’ undoing

In the Philippines, there are many people who claim to have a monopoly on great ideas. They claim to know what is good for you and everyone else. Some of them get very impatient about bringing their ideas into “action”. These people also think that their ideas are superior to other people’s ideas. They quickly dismiss as mere nuisances those who choose to examine things through careful scrutiny of the detail. These people — those who think they are “brilliant” — insist that the time for talking or discussing things is OVER and it is time to bring their ideas to the next level, which presumably is actual “execution”.

His arrogance will be his undoing.
HIs arrogance will be his undoing.
Indeed, in an impoverished country like the Philippines, there is no shortage of supposedly brilliant thinkers whose ideas fail the country simply because they did not want their ideas to be put under the microscope or to be subject to further critical evaluation prior to implementation. In other words, a lot of things in the Philippines — like badly-written legislation — fail because they were not examined well enough to see if they could pass the “So what?” test beforehand.

Don’t get me wrong – it is great to see that there are people who are passionate enough to do something to bring their causes and advocacies to fruition. I think it shows that there are people who have genuine concern for the country and are too eager to get things done. However, there is a danger that they could fall into the trap of wallowing too much in their own pile of crap. This usually happens the minute they stop entertaining new ideas and dissenting views. As they say, arrogance diminishes wisdom. When this happens, the advocacy becomes more about their ego and not about the idea.

When you start thinking that your ideas are always better than others, then that’s when you stop learning. How many times have we seen people proven wrong years or decades later after they arrogantly insisted they were right? The answer: countless times over the history of mankind. We see it happening right before our eyes. A lot of Aquino supporters are notorious for dismissing any suggestions that President Benigno Simeon “BS” Aquino is incompetent and vindictive. They are averse to criticism and other ideas. This will eventually be their undoing.

We must have room for improvement and compromise. We can’t always be right 100 percent of the time. We might see something work in other countries but just because it does doesn’t mean it will work in our own country. Analyzing what works in other places should only serve to give us an idea of what we can do but we might have to alter a few bits and pieces to suit before we can apply it to our local situation. Cultural differences can hamper the implementation of a perfectly-articulated idea that was successfully implemented elsewhere.

To cite an example, there are countries like United Kingdom of Great Britain that don’t even have written constitutions, but their society still functions to optimal levels. Meanwhile, there are countries like our own with voluminous bodies of laws but whose society still fails to function to an acceptable international standard. It could be because majority of Filipinos refuse to follow even simple guidelines, what more a big set of laws?

Opening up the economy to foreign investors to help solve the country’s unemployment is an idea that sounds rational to some but would seem unpatriotic to others. It’s actually funny how some of those who say that a parliamentary system would fit the Philippines cannot even handle a simple online discussion without resorting to name-calling and psychopathic behavior when their views are challenged. Not that I am against a parliamentary system of government for the Philippines, but it’s just plain obvious that Filipinos in general aren’t mature enough to handle opposing views, which is something one should expect in such a system where reality checks on one’s ideas are par for the course. Or take the debate around reproductive health. Giving away free contraceptive pills and making sex education readily-available could be another bright idea to curb high population growth, but these ideas may be absolutely unacceptable to a lot of people due to what they claim is its moral and financial implications.

These are just some of the issues that cannot be rushed by saying that the time for discussion is OVER. All parties need to be satisfied using mature and intelligent discussions prior to arriving at a conclusion as opposed to one party using bullying tactics just to get their way.

Once a bad idea has been implemented, many lives and billions in funds could be lost before its instigators could realize it. It can cause billions more to reverse the damage. Sometimes the damage is already irreversible. Years and even decades could be lost and generations of people’s lives could be ruined before people can begin to wonder how things could have possibly gone wrong. The Iraq war was a bad idea that was implemented even before common folks could get around to thinking about and discussing its possible consequences. Sadly, the Americans are not the only people who will suffer for years to come as a result of the ill-thought-out war.

Recent events have made some people reflect on the legacy of past world leaders and how they affected their society and the world around it. When news of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s death from a stroke at age 87 made headlines around the world, the reaction was mixed. Whether they view her as their greatest or their worst leader, the one thing most people agree on is that she was one of the most “polarizing” leaders of the free world.

To those who laud Thatcher, they saw the Iron Lady’s 11-year tenure in office as the decade that Great Britain kicked some ass, so to speak. After all, the invasion of the Falkland Islands in 1982 was thwarted when she ordered the British armed forces to “take care” of the Argentinean forces. She was also said to have been instrumental in that momentous event in 1989, which was the fall of the Berlin Wall. She could arguably have been the inspiration for some of the greatest hits from the United Kingdom. For they say that it was in the 1980s when inequality in the UK began to worsen resulting in the many riots, protests and hunger strikes that marked that decade for the UK. All that 1980s rock-n-roll fuelled by woes and discontent surely paid off in terms of music royalties — for some, at least.

Some financial industry pundits along with Prime Minister David Cameron himself also hailed Thatcher as the one who averted the possible financial collapse of the British Empire had it embraced the Euro. Even before the Euro was born, she was completely against the idea of a single currency for Europe. She was said to have fought a lone battle against adopting the Euro and the accompanying closer political and economic integration of the European nations. Unfortunately, her unpopular views caused factions within her own Conservative party that saw her leadership challenged and eventually led to her ouster in 1990. The collapse of Iceland and Greece’s economy however, vindicated her but not until decades later.

According to an excerpt from her autobiography, Thatcher’s wisdom then which was being made to come across as xenophobic by her critics, was accurate in predicting that a single currency would not be able to “accommodate both industrial powerhouses such as Germany and smaller countries such as Greece”. Germany, forecast Thatcher, “would be phobic about inflation, while the euro would prove fatal to the poorer countries because it would “devastate their inefficient economies”.

To those who loathed Thatcher, her death was a cause for celebration, a time to dance for joy – on top of her grave if it were up to many of them. History had been kind to her despite the fact that her government supposedly initiated Britain’s de-industrialization. Her government cut down on manufacturing jobs and years of social unrest took place as a result. In retrospect, it probably didn’t make sense to a lot of people then that the world’s first industrial nation was trimming down its manufacturing industry. Thatcher’s government rationalized that this would make “industrial companies leaner and release labor to expand businesses in the more lucrative service sector”. Sadly, their prediction was wrong. Those who were laid off found it difficult to find work and some ended up with low paying jobs:

The loss of skilled manufacturing jobs widened inequality, with negative consequences for social mobility. In the 1980s, income inequality between the top and bottom 20 percent of British households widened by 60 percent. Inequality continued to rise, with only minor fluctuations, under Britain’s next three prime ministers, John Major, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

Basically, the British people lost their jobs even before Globalization – even before outsourcing manufacturing jobs to cheap labourers in developing countries came into vogue. No wonder some people hate her with a passion especially since Germany and France were able to maintain their manufacturing industries and sustained lower social inequality compared to Britain as a result.

It seems that Thatcher didn’t make any apologies for the loss of jobs nor the rising inequalities and the overall consequences of her government’s policies. Some claim that she lacked empathy for the poor and refer to them as “work-shy”. Ironically, her anti-poor policies seemed to have increased the number of poor people in the UK.

It is clear that Thatcher got some things right but she also got some things wrong. Some of her policies had devastating consequences to British society. Her arrogance ultimately prevented her from accepting realities.

We can only learn from the lessons of how arrogance during Thatcher’s and George W Bush’s terms destroyed lives and livelihood. So to the Filipinos who think they are ready to implement their brilliant ideas: think again. Even a luminary like Thatcher fell into the trap of wallowing in her own crap a few times in her career. It seemed to happen when she declared the discussion over.

In the Philippines, public servants quite often make mistakes that affect millions of Filipino lives because they rush into action without even thinking. Unfortunately, their actions reveal they are only concerned about their own personal agendas that hardly benefit the majority of the Filipino people.

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Post Author: Ilda

In life, things are not always what they seem.

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150 Comments on "Lack of thinking and arrogant attitudes are the Philippines’ undoing"

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Gerry
Guest
Thatcher was not vindicated by Greece and Iceland’s collapse. Thacther/Reagan economic policies are what caused those collapses.Privatization, de-regulation of the banking system(transfer of private debt to public debt and then the selling off of the countries assets to Goldman Sachs to further hollow out the economies), getting rid of Union labor and destroying the middle-class in the U.K., U.S.A. and everywhere else in the West. Next up? The N.H.S. in the U.K. is about to be privatized and it will be another disaster for the little people. But the above is not really what I want to say about this… Read more »
ser chief
Guest

Great article.

Trosp
Guest
@Ilda “…Whether they view her as their greatest or their worst leader, the one thing most people agree on is that she was one of the most “polarizing” leaders of the free world. To those who laud Thatcher, they saw the Iron Lady’s 11-year tenure in office as the decade that Great Britain kicked some ass, so to speak.” Something is missing in that remarks. As usual, it’s the context. Who are those people that agrees she was the most polarizing leader in the world and those who lauds her. “For they say that it was in the 1980s when… Read more »
Trosp
Guest

@gerry

Take note of this one.

I don’t have to have all day to explain my position. Just knowing where to search the information I want because I’m familiar with the issue.

If I’m not, I’ll not let my emotion gets over me.

I’ll not pretend to know the issue based on my emotion.

Robert Haighton
Guest

Cone you guys,

dont play it personal.

We are living in the internet-era. We have access to almost all international newspapers and international magazines (like The Economist, Frankfurter Allgemeine, The Guardian, Washington Post c.s.).

Its not difficult to find out what caused the Icelandic Save disaster and the Greece aid.

In my country its all over the TV news and all kinds of “current affairs” tv programs.

Robert Haighton
Guest

TYPO

Cone you guys = Come on you guys.

Trosp
Guest

@Robert

Seems to me I’m agreeing again with you.

Nothing should be personal.

Let’s be factual.

And the other commenter is in a meltdown if you have read all his comments in this post.

Explain it to him.

Gerry
Guest

The problem in Greece started in 2001, G&S moved in and raped the country and steadily did what could look as a corporate take-over( a hostile one). Not all of what happened is available thru the mainstream media. The current situation in Cyprus is the next template being struck to confiscate wealth on a global basis.
Mr.Haighton, I am sure you understand why I will not explain myself to the clown that always resorts to insults, he truly is a clue-less annoyance.

Trosp
Guest
@gerry Can you give us the link of your claim – “Thatcher was not vindicated by Greece and Iceland’s collapse. Thacther/Reagan economic policies are what caused those collapses.Privatization, de-regulation of the banking system(transfer of private debt to public debt and then the selling off of the countries assets to Goldman Sachs to further hollow out the economies), getting rid of Union labor and destroying the middle-class in the U.K., U.S.A. and everywhere else in the West. Next up? The N.H.S. in the U.K. is about to be privatized and it will be another disaster for the little people.” Seems to… Read more »
Trosp
Guest

But then, if it’s just your conjecture or speculation, so be it. Just let the readers know it’s your conjecture.

Gerry
Guest

I do not have all day to explain the financial collapse of Greece or Iceland, it well known to anyone who has watched the events of the last 3-4 yrs..

telling me what to do(as if …) is not going to get me to inform you about what you should already know. do your own homework.

Trosp
Guest

I know how they collapsed but it’s different from what you’re telling us.

You’re telling us that Thatcher was not vindicated by Greece’s and Iceland collapses.

Say classy kid. Stick to your anecdote. I’m not telling you what to do. I’m obliging to be upfront.

Trosp
Guest
BTW, I might find your excuse very useful in my future losing arguments – “I do not have all day to explain the financial collapse of Greece or Iceland, it well known to anyone who has watched the events of the last 3-4 yrs..” He he he. I’ll include them in my favorite argument preludes if I want to short-cut the arguments – “the experts says” “new findings by latest research” “people who would not like to be identified” “scientific consensus” “according to the unidentified source” “It is well known to anyone” and some of my neighbors do not even… Read more »
Gerry
Guest

its not my job to tell you anything.
Go ask wikipedia,LOL!!!
Wikipedia, LOL!!!

ask wikipedia why the USA and UK are unable to raise interest rates at this time, see what, if anything, they tell you.

ask wikipedia…HAHAHAH!

Again, it is not my job to TELL you or anybody else anything.You THINK you know what is going on? Yeah, sure ya do!wikipedia told you!

The insult is un-wanted too.

benign0
Admin

@Trosp: I’ve deleted two unnecessarily abrasive comments you made earlier. Consider that a warning. You won’t get another one.

Gerry
Guest

@Benigno, thanks for deleting that guys insults. He is truly a good example of the title of this essay.

Trosp
Guest

@Gerry

May I know what has insulted you in my comment so that I’ll not use it again in arguing with you?

All the time I’m giving you comments that are factual.

Trosp
Guest

@benign0,

I’ve posted 2 counter-comments after your warning and they were not posted.

benign0
Admin

I saw them in the spam queue but they still did not satisfy my criteria so they’ve been flushed down the hole with the rest of the spam. Your comments are now coming through so hopefully you’ve learnt from this experience. Getting yourself in our spam filter database is a pain in the ass. So try to avoid that next time. As I said in my previous comment addressed to you, you will not be warned again.

Trosp
Guest

@benign0

So my apology is not enough for you.

It still did not satisfy your criteria.

Well, as I’ve said before, I’m a visitor here in your blog.

I’ll rephrase my comments.

Trosp
Guest

@benigno

And don’t get me wrong in using a different IP address. My office in Binan has this internet provider down.

I have to use this globe tattoo.

Gerry
Guest

AAHHH, the jack-ass hath spoken.
I replied about what exactly I meant to Ilda although it should not have been necessary.I did it as a courtesy to her as she asked nicely.

The only reason I will not explain anything to you, clue-less one, is because of your wise-alec attitude. That is also what keeps me from feeling oh-so-sorry for your wikipedia quoting sorry-ass.

Paul Farol
Guest

Maybe the webmasters of this site should install a plug in that automatically replaces slurs and ad hominems with funny words.

Hahaha!

Moonlight Bomber
Guest

While this approach may be effective, there is also a side effect of automatically filtering out offensive language: the Scunthorpe Problem.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scunthorpe_problem

Libertas
Guest

if you have ever been to scunthorpe it does have a problem and obviously an unfortunate name.
we could filter out communists and conspiracy theorists – often one and the same, and so easy to spot, and to ignore.

Johnny Saint
Guest
“Thatcher was not vindicated by Greece and Iceland’s collapse. Thacther/Reagan economic policies are what caused those collapses.Privatization, de-regulation of the banking system(transfer of private debt to public debt and then the selling off of the countries assets to Goldman Sachs to further hollow out the economies)…” This is a BLATANT LIE. I am not certain what propaganda machine this was regurgitated from but at best it’s a twisted version of the actual events. It is overly simplistic and irresponsible to lay the blame for the world’s economic crisis at the feet of two dead politicians when the truth is that… Read more »
Gerry
Guest

The way you and the clown ( whose insults were removed) carry yourselves it seems like you think you are the only people with ideas and that only YOU KNOW what is going on, and you express it pretty arrogantly.
AS IF,PFFFF….

It ain’t “regurgitated propaganda” BUT it does happen to be way beyond the scope of this article whose title is , rather IRONICALLY, about arrogant attitudes in the Philippines.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Precisely. It is very arrogant of you to drop comments and declare you don’t have to explain your ideas when people challenge them because you can’t be bothered.

Now it just looks like you won’t reply, cite sources or establish context simply because you don’t like the fact that actual events do not coincide with your beliefs.

Libertas
Guest

if someone is superior to gerry it doesn’t make them arrogant, but just emphasises his low self esteem and place in the world order.

Yup
Guest

Yeah, so he can’t really explain what his talking about? so very liberal-socialist..

Johnny Saint
Guest
With regards to the fiction of “the selling off of the countries assets to Goldman Sachs to further hollow out the economies,” please refer to this New York Times article from 2010: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/14/business/global/14debt.html?pagewanted=1&hp&_r=0 Since we are on the topic of Greece, it should be noted that the Greek Ministry of Finance points to government deficit spending as one of the key reasons for the collapse of their economy. After the removal of the right-wing military junta in 1974, the government wanted to bring disenfranchised left-leaning portions of the population into the economic mainstream. In order to do so, successive Greek… Read more »
Gerry
Guest
“please refer to the NY Times article” (from June 2010), sure! Goldman Sachs and the hollowing out of the Greek economy started back in 2001. Taking the words of the NY Times in this matter is like asking the fox who ate the chickens in the hen house. This is all way beyond the scope of this essay and thanks to the clown and his insults I am just not in the mood, nor do I even give a shit at the moment, to take any more time to explain what happened, who did what, who took what and so… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
There’s rioting on Greek streets too by the way. And again you are quite correct — this is going off on a tangent from the topic of the article. Several books have been devoted to analyzing the phenomenon. Those are the sources I cited above. But you did bring up another interesting notion for which you again refuse to provide proof. Two actually. The first is that you seem to be implying the NY Times is involved in spin control for your Goldman Sachs conspiracy. Second, that this is a much wider plot to attack European economic systems. Oh, and… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
So now you’re reduced to name calling and foul language. Still no effort to prove your position other than a tantrum because you don’t appreciate other people’s opinion. If you were familiar with discourse and rhetoric you’d be aware that the use of proofs to support your argument is the norm. The NY Times article simply describes the events succinctly. It isn’t the only source of information out there. Dropping fanciful notions and fallacies without context doesn’t get you anywhere. And apparently you embody the topic of Ilda’s article. “I don’t need Rex Reed to tell me the plot of… Read more »
Trosp
Guest

@ J. Saint

You shamed him if he has shame.

Robert Haighton
Guest
Dear Ilda, “Once a bad idea has been implemented, many lives and billions in funds could be lost before its instigators could realize it. It can cause billions more to reverse the damage. Sometimes the damage is already irreversible. Years and even decades could be lost and generations of people’s lives could be ruined before people can begin to wonder how things could have possibly gone wrong.” – I am just wondering what it will cost to change the Phili constitution and/or a few Phili laws, in order to make same-sex marriages possible? – I am just wondering what it… Read more »
Henry Walowitz
Guest

“The greatest harm can result from the best intentions.” – Stone of Tears by Terry Goodkind

“It sounds a paradox, but kindness and good intentions can be an insidious path to destruction. Sometimes doing what seems right is wrong, and can cause harm. The only counter to it is knowledge, wisdom, forethought, and understanding the First Rule (People Are Stupid). Even then, that is not always enough.”

ChinoF
Member

The title of this article is very descriptive of Da Pinoy’s common behaviors. Pinoy Pride exactly depends on these attitudes. “Who needs thinking? Just be proud! Pinoy tayo! Kami lang ang tama! Lahat ng iba mali!” The picture I made for my old article “Filipinos are not the best things in the world,” will fit this article too.

Peace Walker
Guest

GRP, I’d like to ask your opinion involving the theme of this article: What do you guys think of Pixel Offensive?

Johnny Saint
Guest

It’s good for theatrics and sound bites.

Peace Walker
Guest

Aside from that, what else?

Johnny Saint
Guest

And new source material for bumper stickers and tee shirts.

Peace Walker
Guest

But what about the ideologies they espouse?

Johnny Saint
Guest

That’s just it. They haven’t really articulated any kind of coherent ideology. Just a notion that they’re against capitalism and feudalism and host of other “isms.” Aside from seeming to support left leaning ideologues and attaching themselves to populist causes, they have never laid out what they are FOR. Nor have they ever revealed what they are going put in place of the (political and/or economic) system they want to tear down. They make a lot of noise and lame satirical photo montages, and little else of substance.

ChinoF
Member

Mere outrage faddists.

Peace Walker
Guest

May I ask the rest of GRP about it? Especially the webmaster for this?

benign0
Admin

I don’t really have an opinion about them. As Johnny Saint pointed out, they haven’t really articulated an ideology or position on any matter. I like their art though… 😉

Johnny Saint
Guest

I’ll second that 😉 You could put that on a t-shirt 😉

domo
Guest

A bunch of commietards.

Libertas
Guest

inoffensive but directionless.
link up with a compatible group and am sure there would be benefits of synergy, otherwise here today, pixelated tomorrow

Libertas
Guest
There is a view that narcissistic leaders/regimes will always create social unrest and restrict economic progress, as self-interest and self-agrandissment is their primary motivation rather than the greater good, and short term approval is more important than strategic decisions. Margaret thatcher was the exact opposite of p-noy, and a rare example of conviction politics combining intellect and integrity with vision and achievement, and with the courage to take tough decisions even in the face of adversity. P-noy on the other hand is about as much use and as weak as a roll of cheap toilet paper. The cojuangco-aquinos would make… Read more »
david
Guest

Conviction politics that sent young men to die in a bullshit war because she wanted a distraction at home. A few thousand British descendants on an island on the other side of the world taken only just over a hundred years before when “Britannia rules the waves”. Let’s also not forget Pinochet. In the world history of assholes she’s far from the worst..but

Libertas
Guest

and your alternative strategy would have been…?

Toinks
Guest

Good post, Libertas. Completely agree, there is no comparison between Margaret Thatcher and Pnoy. The difference is so extreme, like heaven and hell.

Libertas
Guest
“Ideas make money, money does not make ideas” walt disney Creativity is a scarce and prized commodity, especially in business where innovation, development, and problem solving separate the winners from the losers. Creativity is also a driving force in the economy and there is a clear correlation between creative cultures/countries and economic development. Creative cultures also exhibit higher levels of personal satisfaction/happiness. In many respects everyone is born creative but societal and educational systems work against it, stifling rather than developing it, promoting collectivism rather than induviduality. The challenge for educational reform in enlightened countries is to ensure that creativity… Read more »
Paul Farol
Guest

Having worked in several companies and having had several organizations as clients over the years, one thing I’ve found out is that effective organizations have a lot of individuals who can work together despite differences in thinking.

The problem isn’t that there IS conflict within the organization, but the members of that organization or teams within that organization that I’ve worked with KNOW how to deal with conflict.. they know how to compromise and how to reach consensus.

Libertas
Guest
It the individual differences/contributions which combine to create the strength of the team. And most corporations invest in training to be effective in groups be it belbins 8 roles, brainstorming, metaplanning etc. An essential component of total quality management initiatives and also when working in multidisciplinary teams and across borders/cultures. Companies here would do better to utilise/adapt the Baldrige model or european foundation for quality management (efqm) as tried and tested templates for continuous improvement and team working. But it only works where there is mutual respect and not an us/them dynamic between management and others. In philippines management has… Read more »
Libertas
Guest

“I keep six honest serving-men
(They taught me all I knew);
Their names are What and Why and When
And How and Where and Who.”
Rudyard kipling

FallenAngel
Member

Hi Ilda,

Looks like you haven’t lost your touch, hehehe.

Comparing Noynoy and Thatcher, of course, is commonly thought of as similar to comparing chalk and cheese. In Japanese they term it “undei no sa”, which literally refers to the big difference between clouds (un) and mud (dei).

Conviction and stubbornness can be often thought of as two sides of the same coin. What, then, is the fine line that separates them?

Results.

We don’t have to think very hard who’s gotten them.

Commiecs
Guest

Excellent piece, Ilda. I seriously doubt Noynoy can learn a thing or two from the rise and fall of the late Iron Lady.

Libertas
Guest

Noynoy puts the penis in Penistone and will be at home in Scunthorpe, but his favorite place in England is Banbury after reading the nursery rhyme
“Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross”

Libertas
Guest

p-noy aquino has bought a condo unit in The Oedipus Complex.
a home for political mother f@ckers.

Amir Al Bahr
Guest

He also has a condo unit in the Persecution Complex

Johnny Derp
Guest

Don’t forget the one that he has in the Closeted Homosexuals Complex

Libertas
Guest

P: Mommy mommy someone said i have an oedipus complex.
C: Shut up, and get back into bed.

P: Mommy mommy do you have one of these things between your legs.
C: i will once you shut up.

P: Mommy mommy someone said my sister is a whore.
C: shut up, a whore gets paid.

P: Mommy mommy who killed my father
C: shut up, and hand me your uncle’s gun.

Gerry
Guest

Think its funny to insult people’s Mother’s? I don’t care who it is, or what they’ve done, NO!

Not cool, not cool at all! and not even close to being funny.

jeanne
Guest
Hi Ilda, Never knew that you will mention Mrs. Thatcher in your post. I have been a lurker on the UK forums when the death of Mrs. T happened and I read first hand her polarizing effect on the current citizens of the UK. I would like to put up a correction. Mrs. Thatcher was a Conservative PM, not Labour. Conservatives are the favorable lot of the business and capitalists. Labour is the opposite party, the socialists. Her victory as PM was due to the fact that the Labour government was not adept at controlling the strikers in the UK,… Read more »
libertas
Guest
Understandably her death creates comment – good and bad – and debate for a brief period in time, but relating to the philippines: 1. Her son or daughter are not suddenly swept to power on a groundswell of sympathy – most people think carol is bright but a bit eccentric, and her son mark an absolute waste of space and now lives outside of the uk, thank god. 2. There is no ongoing preoccupation with the past, brand thatcher and anniversaries of her birth, death and going to the toilet. The world, and politics in the uk moves on. Only… Read more »
jeanne
Guest

Have to agree.

Personally, if we have the Parliament style of the UK, Pnoy will not have a spare minute to campaign. He will be grilled by the opposition for his policies (no matter how moderate or hard core that may be) and I would smile at the moment when an argument backfires on him (proof that he’s still accountable to the people).

libertas
Guest

I think the parliamentary system – which i prefer – is alone not the answer, and even with its own flaws only works because of political and electoral maturity, ideologically based parties, checks and balances.
It is really a question of culture – india has a parliamentary system but is as corrupt as the philippines.

jeanne
Guest
I am agreeing with you once more. Yes, even the parliamentary system is flawed in some ways but the reasons that I like is that there are two main parties who at least expected to stick to their visions and values (at least in theory) and they can be criticize by not following party manifestos. At least, members stick to the party and not jumping around when it’s election time. Another reason is the debate and Question Time where the Head of Government (and his cabinet) is required to answer for his policies. I hate spokespersons. I need the leader… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
The Philippines has already experimented with a quasi-presidential-parliamentary hybrid form of government under Ferdinand Marcos. A convoluted thing that served largely to rubber-stamp Marcos’ edicts. Cory junked it not so much because she felt a bicameral congress was more conducive to democracy but that it was a construct of the Marcos era. Whichever form you may prefer — unicameral or bicameral — we’re still contending with the same tired, old faces, most notably Aquino, Marcos and Enrile. You are correct in stating that the form of government isn’t the issue. It’s the personalities involved that need to change. And the… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
jeanne, “(T)he reasons that I like is that there are two main parties who at least expected to stick to their visions and values (at least in theory) and they can be criticize by not following party manifestos. At least, members stick to the party and not jumping around when it’s election time.” Technically, a parliamentary democracy allows for any number of parties to register, campaign, articulate their platform, and get elected to the legislature. You mentioned an interesting trait among Filipino politicians: the LACK OF (PARTY) LOYALTY. That really should be addressed. Possibly with penalties. Imagine what would happen… Read more »
libertas
Guest

we need jeremy paxman to come over and interview the cr@p out of these idiots.
that would make nancy binay p!ss her pants

OnesimusUnbound
Guest

“You mentioned an interesting trait among Filipino politicians: the LACK OF (PARTY) LOYALTY”

I would say it’s basic self-preservation. These politicians does not care for the ideas upheld by their party, they wanna join the most popular (and powerful) party to stay in power. I doubt if they can define ideas upheld by their party.

Johnny Saint
Guest

“I doubt if they can define ideas upheld by their party.”

They are ALL familiar with the ideals of one political party — the Party of ME, MYSELF and I.

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