Just grin and bear it – Filipinos don’t like tough questions

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Basket-Wire-Dog-Muzzle-GSD-shepherd_LRGThey don’t like asking them. They sure as hell do not like answering them.

If you think about it, this is rather unsurprising for a society that does not encourage its members to question authority even the slightest.

While examples of questionable things and issues in Filipino society are endless, the past few weeks have provided us fresh examples, but no less effective:

1) The Iglesia ni Cristo (INC) members certainly didn’t want non-members of the flock asking questions about their charity walk. Never mind that that event was very public, very revealing, and very inconveniencing for people affected by the closed-off areas. What they did was to deflect those questions and instead insist on pointing out that certain Catholic and Christian rituals and events should be criticized too. As if that excuses them from being questioned on account of “tu quoque”.

Why was setting a Guinness world record highlighted often?
Why go for a very public way of collecting funds, supposedly for Haiyan victims, when they could just quietly “require” it from their obedient flock members?
How exactly will the funds get to the Haiyan victims?
Is there another message, possibly political, underneath that the INC would like to send to the rest of the Philippines?
Did the lost productivity, economic impact, and traffic-related inconvenience make the event worthwhile, and for whom exactly?

2) Leave it to the government to tell the citizens to bear with the Skyway 3 project and the horrendous traffic that the construction works have been causing. It was implied that the citizens should shut their traps. We wanted progress, so to speak, now we’re going to get it, so don’t complain.

Why did the project start only now?
Why did several projects have to start simultaneously?
Why weren’t these started in the period between 2010 to 2013?
Were these projects started now primarily to make current president Benigno Simeon “BS” Aquino look good when he steps down in 2016?

3) The issue of the pork barrel has been a touchy one ever since last year. It seems, however, that the drama that it has been shaping up to be, due to people lining up to be “state witnesses” and “whistleblowers”, could be contributing to the persisting apathy the public have for it.

Why should whistleblowers be given special treatment?
Why do Senate inquiries carry on when they have a track record of leading to nothing?
Don’t people find it just a bit odd that the Senate is rather “selective” in investigating a few of their own?
Should the Senate even be in that position of investigating a few of their own?

4) BS Aquino is baffled by persisting unemployment and reports that certain areas affected by calamities are still not yet rehabilitated?

Why is the so-called inclusive growth not trickling down to the average Juan?
Where is the causal link between the figures that BS Aquino touts as good (stock market and GDP for example) and the improvement in the fortunes and well-beings of the average Juan?
Why did BS Aquino ignore the Haiyan victims who came to talk to him in Malacañang?
Why was BS Aquino shocked that “nobody told him” of news that isn’t good?

5) Every year, we ask the same old thing about the 1986 EDSA uprising. Why has the freedom and democracy we supposedly got back after that event not led to an improvement in the plight of Filipinos?

Filipinos don’t like asking questions because of the fear of hiya. It works both ways, they don’t want to be embarrassed by the rest of the group who usually pre-judge questions as worthless and stupid. They also don’t like embarrassing others. They believe that “harmony” is more important than being inquisitive and resolving issues.

Filipinos don’t like answering questions that make them feel uncomfortable. Especially with the case of BS Aquino, Filipinos don’t like bad news, criticism, and unflattering remarks. Filipinos always gear themselves towards only the “positive” and feel-good things; they ignore problems and issues that they are either not equipped to handle, or quite simply don’t want to handle.

They just grin, actually flash their trademark ngiting-aso, and bear it.

So once, again, need we wonder why the fortunes of Filipinos hardly improve?

It’s because not only do they don’t ask tough questions, they don’t even think about asking questions, period. Their reflex is to go with the flow, and to accept things, especially if they’re popular.

Not only don’t they know, they don’t want to know.

Ignorance is bliss. Kawawa naman mga Pinoy.

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About FallenAngel

А вы, друзья, как ни садитесь, все в музыканты не годитесь. - But you, my friends, however you sit, not all as musicians fit.

23 Comments on “Just grin and bear it – Filipinos don’t like tough questions”

  1. I often mention the 4 stages of learning in my posts. First step is unconscious incompetent . Not only don’t you know but you are too dumb to know that you don’t know. Our president likes it that way which makes him perfect for this country.

  2. Excellent summary and insight.

    It’s the equivalent of ‘mushroom management style’ – keep them in the dark, and feed them bullsh!t’

    Except, if course for the senate probes – where the aim is bullsh!t in, and for, the public domain, rather than any actual court proceedings.
    Pnoy aquino and de lima say any court case could be after 2016 (if ever)!! – basis for horse trading with binay.

  3. I have often wondered why the Philippines is one of the very few countries on this planet where one can run for office without having to face tough questions, heck, they don’t even have platform. Should there not at least be some public debates by the candidates? Debating each other. So we can see what morons they are. The media people here deserve to be executed, for having no balls or spine to ask any relevant question. Those mouth-breathers just steal our oxygen. If they ask some soft-as-cotton question, the answer, any answer, is swallowed as is and followed up by some dumb ass remark like, “Ah, oh, I see. Talaga?”.
    Jesus fucking Christ! Those people are no journalists. They are not only paid off, but just as idiotic as the candidates. Never have I heard a sharp follow up question. AARRRRRGH! I want media that GRILLS those assholes till they glow in the dark. I want a media that points out what dirty rotten liars those politicians are, by showing what they promised before they got elected and then grill them again on why they have not fulfilled any of their promises. The only way to save this country is to pass legislation that you have to have some special educational background to run for office and if you don’t pay taxes, you are not allowed to vote. That alone would be a good start.

  4. Our country as a nation has been enslaved and under colonization of Spain, America, and Japan. As slave we are not allowed to reason, not allowed to speak up, not allowed to stand against our colonizers. We have been like this for hundreds of years.

    We are still like this up to this date. But instead of other countries, we are enslaved by religion, political ideology, and corporate greed. We just accept the fact that we cannot do nothing about it, that we are mere pawns. There are some that stand out, but they are outnumbered by those who do not accept it. A person will only allowed change if he is ready for it.

    I know that most men—not only those considered clever, but even those who are very clever, and capable of understanding most difficult scientific, mathematical, or philosophic problems—can very seldom discern even the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as to oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions they have formed, perhaps with much difficulty—conclusions of which they are proud, which they have taught to others, and on which they have built their lives.

    – Leo Tolstoy

    1. USA herself was a colony, so was canada, then there’s australia, singapore, macau, hongkong, taiwan, new zealand, entire middle east.

      in philippines’ immediate vicinity, singapore was taught the white man was invincible, above reproach , native populations under the british were segregated and ruled with ” divide and conquer” methods

      yet the contrast started as soon as the americans let go and allowed philippines to govern herself.
      so I’m not so sure the problem can be blamed on colonialism.

      1. A problem as complex as ours cannot be blamed on one thing alone, like colonialism. It was surely a big factor, especially since our lasted for almost four centuries, with more than 3 centuries of “obscurantism” under the Spaniards,as termed by Rizal. But colonialism dealt a fatal blow on our character as a people because we weren’t very introspective to begin with, having gotten used to not exerting too much effort to think and work hard owing to the relative abundance of natural resources in our land. That’s called the “paradox of abundance” or “resource curse.” I personally think that this second problem was the more serious one because the hardships we bore under colonialism could have even made us better people if we had a solid character, a reflective attitude, and highly logical and piercing minds as people. But then again, this is just my opinion.

  5. This is the problem of Filipinos…we don’t ask questions and tell the truth. We just want to ” go with the flow”…it is called Apathy. We have been Desensitized by our leaders…to accept our fates…bear and grin it…Remember, we have been like this, from the time we remember. It’s time to take over our lives; and take our country back…

    1. same thing can be said of the singaporeans, they haven’t changed government since independence, hardly question politicians at all.
      quite apathetic , just wants to get on with life
      so you can’t blame that totally too

      1. Who cares about the Singaporean….if they want to worship: Lee Kuan Yew; it’s their problem. Not us, like the YellowTards worshiping the Aquinos…insanity!

        1. You probably should considering he built the country from the ground up which allows your countrymen to even work in Singapore in the first place. LKY’s achievements are understandably more worthy of praise than anything Ninoy has ever done in his life.

        2. The irony here is, Filipino professionals, white collared workers were non existent during his time.
          Skilled labour were either Singaporeans or Malaysians

          Lky inherited a thriving port from UK. He did not build anything from ground up. Ministers like Goh Keng swee did. Lky initially wanted to push for import substitution policies which have been proven not to work before his time.

          What lky did was keep people in line and created a stable government for economic policies of the other ministers to thrive instead of allowing infighting.

        3. Gates opened to Filipino workers under his son’s reign. Not lky

          Lky himself often had not really nice stuff to say about neighbouring countries and the labour provided plus the crime rate

      2. Annnnnnd after the gates were opened to Filipino workers, Singapore finally had her first armed robbery of a fast food restaurant via an inside job

  6. The is no bliss in the country. Just pain suffering and poverty. The waiters I have encountered recently seemed they’d rather throw the plate of food on the floor, rather than serve it to a paying restaurant patron. Who could blame them. When the amount of money the waiter will make for the day is not enough to buy a ‘Happy’ meal at McD’s, something ain’t right and it is not changing for the better. In fact its getting worse.
    What a mess.

  7. Pork barrel was bad enough – DAP is simply blatant and wholesale criminality, laid directly at aquino’s door.
    No wonder there is panic, alibis, and refusal to reveal any list/information or answer any questions.
    This is aquinogate in the making

    1. MAYBE, but not a single person will lose their job, money or anything else. The Philippines is not the USA and no one is ‘going down’, no one. WATCH!

  8. Paraphrasing sir david frost

    ‘You have to ask the hard questions in a soft way.
    And you have to keep your powder dry. The first question is nearly always answered by a rehearsed/stock response. It is the second question which is critical and which opens up the discussion’

    Abs-cbn school of political journalism – ask them about their love life/trivia. At all costs don’t upset them. It is also curious and very noticeable how most/all abs-cbn interviewers are women – so already subservient. Not one political hard hitter.

  9. I like the picture of the dog in this article. I wish I can muzzle the dog that belongs to the squatter nearby the condo I live in. It barks all night long. I would probably be arrested and deported if I took matters into my own hand. And, I wish I can muzzle the dog owner too when he gives me dumb answers to my complaint. Ha ha! Yeah, and here in Cebu City the people ask me questions, but 90% of the time they don’t understand my answer, like my answer, or just don’t want to accept it, and pretend not to hear what I say, whether I speak in Visayan, English, or Tagalog. This is no country for old white men!

  10. don’t criticize the INC, their church administration might get mad at you and junk their support for bongbong marcos, your bet in 2016.

  11. When honesty takes a back seat to image we will have problems. Image and face are temporary but truth is permanent. In the long term, societies that are honest will prosper and those focused on image will implode. America’s recent fall is mainly due to the rise of ego and image. The leaders and oligarchs are an outgrowth of image over truth and ethics not the exception. Being honest and honestly seeking the real truths builds character and a foundation in which to build upon but is often met with scorn. Ever met an truly honest Filipino? I have and they are salt of the earth unfortunately they represent a small percentage of the population. Let’s all try to stop caring so much what others think of us and focus on who we actually are. Behavior is what counts in the long run, not image. If you want hope in your life give it to someone else.

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