Filipinos have come to prefer VIOLENT solutions to their national problems

Filipinos are no longer moved by what the traditional ‘owners’ of ‘human rights’ presume to say on their behalf.

Who owns the concept of “human rights”? Is it the United Nations? Is it the Commission on Human Rights (CHR)? Is it Chito Gascon? Is it the Yellowtards? If we are to believe certain “thought leaders”, it seems everyone but ordinary Filipinos are “human rights” advocates.

They are overdue for a reality check. Just within sight and earshot of most ordinary Filipinos are “human rights violations” galore. That obnoxious neighbour who belts out “My Way” on his karaoke at three in the morning? The tricycles and jeepneys that respectively putt-putt and roar past us while spewing corrosive fumes into our faces? Those cretins who, oblivious to the surrounding people who were there first, help themselves to the buffet table? No, sir. We are not allowed to complain about them because all that buffoonery is just part of the “Filipino experience”. No big deal, right?

If we cannot solve small instances of “human rights” abuse, what hope do we have of solving the big-ticket items?

“Human rights” is just a high-nosed brand slapped on common decency that people should have learned in kindergarten. To the latte-sipping Starbucks set, it is a fashion statement to be dropped at chi chi powows and “polite” conversation. Therein lies the disconnect between what ordinary Filipinos see and what the chattering classes tweeting from their Ivory Towers profess.

Violence is made out to be “un-Filipino” by many of these lactose-addicted village kids. Yet if they bother to look over and outside the walls of their fortified residential enclaves, they will find that Filipinos actually prefer violent solutions to their many issues. The way ordinary Filipino motorists muscle their way through traffic is a case in point. Philippine roads are microcosms of Philippine society. There are rules, but they are so shoddily- and inconsistently-enforced that everyone takes matters into their own hands. You won’t get anywhere in Manila unless you are good at projecting power to surrounding motorists in the form of aggressive lane-changing and tailgating, flashing headlights, and blasting your horn. Philippine roads are a jungle and, it seems, Filipinos are perfectly fine with that.

Consider then the big assumptions that Inquirer columnist Rina Jimenez-David makes about the Filipino mindset — that, she thinks, Filipinos prefer that the government spend their money more on “social works” and less on “violent” solutions. She expresses this dubious assumption in her recent lament on President Rodrigo’s proposed budget for 2018…

Human rights group Karapatan describes this budget as a “war chest against the Filipino people.” The plan for a P3.7-trillion budget, the group says, is to use most of the funds for its counterinsurgency program Oplan Kapayapaan, as well as for the state’s “bloody war on drugs.” Says Karapatan: “Both programs are designed to inflict further State terror and violence on the poor, while public funding for social programs on housing, education, and health services have been or are practically rendered nonexistent.”

Jimenez-David laps up a certain “human rights” group’s screeching indictment of the proposed national budget using emotionally-laden words like “bloody”, “state terror”, and “against the poor” to echo the din of fear-mongering over Duterte’s different approach to dealing with the Philippine situation.

Consider that and then, honestly, think about your own sense of powerlessness over the banal injustice of Philippine society. Who hasn’t at least once fantasized about calling in an air strike on their neighbourhood karaoke singers’ houses? Who hasn’t fantasized about taking out a bazooka and blowing off the road a drug-crazed jeepney or bus driver who had just almost forced you onto a kerb? Who hasn’t once wished they could make that millennial who just walked in front of their spot in a queue while scrolling through her Facebook timeline eat her iPhone for lunch? Who hasn’t, for years on end, wondered in amazement why blatant pork barrel thievery in Congress was not simply dealt with by abolishing that whole insitutionalised crime syndicate?

Then stop to think why Filipinos have just about had it with “peaceful options” and those hipster solutions that require cops and soldiers hamstrung by “human rights” rhetoric to fix Manila’s traffic mess, Mindanao’s terrorist infestation, and the Philippines’ overall culture of crime armed with no more than their best Closeup smiles. As evident in the way ordinary Filipinos drive, it is a safe bet to assume Filipinos have better ideas in mind around how to fix those problems.

The Philippines’ hipster peaceniks have lost the battle for the heart of the Filipino. That’s just the way democracy and the “free market of ideas” that is today’s media landscape works. The statistics that drive who wins in a democracy and the memetic jungle that shapes the winners and losers of the public relations game are mere algorithms of the system we had signed up to as part of our aspirations to be beings of free will. There is no moral or immoral in a democracy and in the media landscape. There are only those who survive and win in the game on the basis of which pitch captures the popular sentiment. Those who lose may throw tantrums and be all crybaby about their loss. But how one behaves when one loses — or when one wins, for that matter — is also a personal choice.

It’s simple, really. If we want Filipinos to regain their faith in the ol’ “human rights” school of thought, its proponents need to get better at selling it in the free market. The “morality” of an idea is not an entitlement to victory. Not in a “democracy” and not in a society where “freedom of speech” is guaranteed.

print

Post Author: benign0

benign0 is the Webmaster of GetRealPhilippines.com.

Leave a Reply

43 Comments on "Filipinos have come to prefer VIOLENT solutions to their national problems"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Random Citizen
Guest

Tendency to solve things through violence is what put Duterte in his office, but only because the previous administration has proven its necessity. He is the “if all else fails” option. People are so fed up with government ineptitude that we’re willing to be ruled with an Iron Fist to get things done.

Personally, I find solving through violence is barbaric, but I also deem it necessary in certain situations. As much as possible, we need to find an alternative non-violent way to do things, but we also have to be prepared to use violence when necessary.

Pallacertus
Guest

Says the second-hand Aussie wanker who doesn’t have to taste iron(y)-rich dog shit. You don’t fucking speak for me, you don’t fucking speak for the innocents killed in this phony war, you don’t speak for their fucked-up families, and you sure as fuck don’t speak for the majority here in this country.

Bugger off, you fuck.

Hyden007Toro9999.999
Guest
We have those “sex starved” nuns, who are demonstrating for “human rights”…the same “sex starved” nuns, who demonstrated for “democracy”, thirty years ago. Instead, we got Feudal Oligarchy, with some theocracy. Making the Aquinos: saints and heroes, and a lot of thievery… I believe, we don’t really understand “human rights”…”Human Rights”, to us is doing what we want, above and beyond the law of the land. “Human Rights” to us, is taking advantage of our fellowmen… The Shabu Drug dealer has more “human rights”, than the Shabu addict, that he/she had addicted. The Crazed “On High” Shabu drug addict has… Read more »
tomas
Guest

Judging from the level of nuclear reactions from certain readers here, looks like the article poked the “hypocrite” button on their “moral” compass. 😉

salagintong bukid
Guest

all their accusations thrown to president duterte are all their doings the same pattern they accused marcos. it won’t work the second time for sure cuz the administration knows what to do…Martial Law. it kept the philippines quiet and peaceful during marcos martial law. poor souls of the yellowtards, return what you’ve stolen from the people. your kingdom is like an octopus now without tentacles. the Fall of the Yellow Kingdom now soaring worldwide.

LMAO.....
Guest

The author MORONICALLY states that ‘…..HUMAN RIGHTS are just a high nose brand of common decency……’, which is FAR from what Human RIGHTS actually are. The IDIOT FILIPINO that cuts in front of people at the buffet IS NOT violating anyone’s Human RIGHTS as the author wants readers to believe…..IT SIMPLY IS NOT SO.

HUMAN RIGHTS are defined by different groups as different things. However, the right to not be aggravated by your fellow countrymen is NOT one of them, GET RESL) no , GET A CLUE EE GAD MON……

Eel Yebay
Guest
Somehow, I find it hard to believe that the current administration is the one directly responsible for these so called “Extrajudicial” killings. It’s so easy to hire some corrupt cop to kill some random kid in the streets… citizen outrage follows and since these cops are in uniform, it’s very easy for them to just point to the guy who says “Kill Kill Kill”. So amidst these killings and resulting outrage, WHO BENEFITS? Forgive my tin foil hat theory, for I have no concrete basis for this idea. However, I think some elements from the opposition ordered these killings. Its… Read more »
ChinoF
Member
Violence has always been the way of the Filipino, even at the grassroots (look up Benign0’s earlier post about violence being a profound condition in Filipino society). From the headhunters of prehistoric Philippines to a jealous admirer of a woman trying to kill her husband in order to get her to an irate person shooting dead a jeepney driver. I believe it’s simply a result of this natural attitude: Everyone wants to exclude people or things that they believe are not useful to them (walang silbi). Or things that prevent them from getting what they want. So they want to… Read more »
Common-Tao
Guest
GRP, Should not be violence but love and compassion. People need to educate people like responsible parents teaching and raring their kids to be good adults someday. We can teach properly but not always being angry and hateful like what you all bloggers are always spouting here. It will not get you anywhere, believe me. Also, killing is not necessary in a civilized society. It is only in barbaric times. I hope you realize that. How come you are teaching Filipinos to be modernize and yet favoring those barbaric medieval acts? Contradiction in your part especially you, Benigno. We don’t… Read more »
ChinoF
Member

By the way, trivia: I’ve read in Filipiknow that when a spouse catches their partner in adultery and kills or seriously injures one or both them, he or she only gets “destierro” (banishment) as a punishment, mainly to help the killer escape retaliation from the victim’s family. That’s Article 247 of the Penal Code. It also applies to parents who catch their daughters having sex with someone they don’t like. Violent solutions still seem somewhat supported by law.

Common-Tao
Guest

Violence is not always the solution in all the cases violative of the laws of the Philippines. There maybe exemption in special cases but acts should be proven as justifiable, example, Justifiable Homicide. Otherwise, there shall be criminal liability incurred on the part of the offender. On your example, husband and wife will still be imprisoned if they remained alive after the unlawful act committed. Only the mistress shall have banishment as a penalty. You should have done your research on that, not for the reason of gossip you already believed. How could you.

interxavier
Guest
The reason why violence is the preferred solution is because the ‘other’ solution is deemed ineffective. Yap all you want about the benefits of love and compassion as well as upholding the rule of law but if they do not deliver the results, it won’t be the go-to solution. This is why vigilantism exists because the institutions that are supposed to combat these problems are ineffective. You want the violence to lessen? Then do a better job of showing the ‘other’ way works. No, denouncing the current administration by saying you are against their policies isn’t going to work. The… Read more »
Common-Tao
Guest
You contradict yourself. Who is in charge of upholding and protecting the rights of the Filipinos? It is the current administration. If Duterte and his administration cannot do their job properly and their premise is going unlawful and if they go against on what they promised to uphold the laws and constitution at all times then they better resign. Upholding the rule of law should start and end with whose in charge of all the political and economic aspects of the Philippines. And that burden lies in the hands of this administration because they are the ones controlling the current… Read more »
interxavier
Guest
Common Tao, You are missing the point. On paper, it’s the leaders who are responsible for upholding the law and protecting individual rights. The problem? Apart from not following those oaths, Duterte’s platform has basically been about killing criminals. That’s what got him elected, his populist rhetoric that he will solve our utmost problems by doing this and that. It’s the people who believed in his way of doing things and eventually handed him the reins. It’s the people’s responsibility to elect a leader, therefore, they get what they vote for. You want the killings to stop and the rule… Read more »
Common-Tao
Guest
Yes. He was elected but that doesn’t mean he is not bound by the law. Nobody should be above the law – the principle of democracy. Those who elected him because they like the ideas of killing are probably uneducated. The disadvantage of democracy allowing different kinds of people to vote. Duterte administration is ruining that principle of democracy by encouraging vigilante killings. Vigilante killing is not a civilized way of implementing the laws in a truly modernized society. It is actually the opposite. How are we going to advance if that is the principle that we must apply. What… Read more »
marius
Guest
Interxavier: you write well. You should start a blog. Or perhaps run for president (purely for amusement value – nobody would vote for you :). ChinoF is quite right above: violence IS the Filipino’s preferred solution. It’s the way humanity has solved things since time immemorial in the absence of other solutions. Civilization is the deliberate abrogation of that basic human drive, and it’s not as simple as just writing some laws and paying some people to dress in police uniforms or judge’s robes. Without the underlying ideas, all you end up with is a sham and a money sink… Read more »
interxavier
Guest

Marius,

We all want a quick fix. It’s human nature. What sets each and everyone of us apart is how we respond to it. Sometimes the bad things has to happen in order for the good things to surface.

catbad
Guest

and things are way better than before, now yellowtards at palace are gone and we finally can get to kill criminals thanks to duterte. killing them is not enough, we need to defile their corpse as a deterrent.

interxavier
Guest
Common-Tao, An important point you may have missed out on is the efficiency of our criminal justice system. I’m not an attorney but you just need to look at the speed of which our courts prosecutes criminals. It is inherently slow and inefficient. The amount of cases that continue to pile up on our courts is insane. Prosecuting everyone of these addicts, pushers, and lords take time as well as money. You honestly can’t expect our criminal courts to handle these cases at their present volume. It’s no wonder our people are restless and no longer see the point of… Read more »
Common-Tao
Guest
Interxavier, You are wrong in your premise again. You want the unlawful acts to be lawful in a civilized society? You want those who seek justice to have shortcuts in the process to obtain justice like killing the offender? Because justice system is taking time and expensive? You are ruining the principle of the whole system. If we follow your thinking, you want to dismantle the very institutions that nurture our values and rights as citizens. This will just make things worse. We already have the foundation and that is the rule of law. If the present administration sees the… Read more »
interxavier
Guest
/* You want the unlawful acts to be lawful in a civilized society? You want those who seek justice to have shortcuts in the process to obtain justice like killing the offender? Because justice system is taking time and expensive? You are ruining the principle of the whole system. */ Again, you missed the point. I used our ineffective and slow justice system as an example to point out flaws in our ‘rule of law’ and why some people have deemed it unworthy of defending—no, I am not one of them in case you are jumping to that conclusion. You… Read more »
marius
Guest
@CommonTao – Well argued. @Interxavier – I notice the tone on GRP has gone from being “we don’t know who’s doing the killing, it’s probably ordinary Filipinos killing each other, and it has nothing to do with Duterte anyway” to “yeah, we’re killing criminals. And maybe a few other people. What of it?”. So now we’ve got that cleared up, what it boils down to is this: what kind of society do you want to live in 10, 20, 30 years from now? Because what you (and the recent articles) seem to be suggesting is that, because Filipinos like killing… Read more »
interxavier
Guest
/* So now we’ve got that cleared up, what it boils down to is this: what kind of society do you want to live in 10, 20, 30 years from now? Because what you (and the recent articles) seem to be suggesting is that, because Filipinos like killing each other, and have no intention to progress as human beings, we should just let them get on with it. */ Same as any sane individual. A developed country that upholds the ‘rule of law’, little to no corruption, pollution-free, ample employment prospects with competitive salaries, ease-of-doing business (domestic and foreign) and… Read more »
ledad
Guest

as long there’s no yellowtards in gov, it’s ok

marius
Guest
Interxavier: thanks for the comprehensive response! I misinterpreted your original post. I read it again and it makes more sense in the context of what you just wrote. Thing is, though, although we might be stuck with the current administration (or any other dysfunctional, populist administration, for that matter), there’s no point just riding it out. You’ll be doing that until the apocalypse – failed societies are notoriously hard to fix from the top down. Somebody has to start doing something useful. When the lunatics are running the asylum, what DO you do if you’re one of the handful of… Read more »
interxavier
Guest
Marius, Duterte is still bound by the constitution, therefore, he cannot stay in office beyond six years. I mentioned in my other comment that sometimes the bad things have to happen in order for the good things to surface. I can see it being applied in this context. People are slowly waking up to the truth that Duterte’s policies are only feel good solutions in the short term. They are not sustainable in the long run. Slowly, people will hopefully realize that cowboy tactics like Duterte’s policies do not work and will elect wisely in the next presidential elections. Till… Read more »
marius
Guest
Interxavier: one critical thing the Smart People’s Club could do with little personal risk and a modest personal expenditure: get Filipinos eating properly. I’m convinced that the diet of junk food is at least partially responsible for widespread mental retardation, and almost wholly responsible for the disgraceful state of public health (diabetes, obesity, etc). You could do this with pure PR (ie., propaganda). The aim would be to pay for blanket advertising coverage across TV and magazines, getting out healthy-eating messages. You would be going up against powerful corporate interests – notably, the one that controls the market for rice… Read more »
marius
Guest
>> I mentioned in my other comment that sometimes the bad things have to happen in order for the good things to surface. I can see it being applied in this context. Ah, understood. I thought you were saying that the bad acts were justifiable since they would have good outcomes. History suggests, though, that Filipinos are not good at drawing the correct conclusions about bad experiences. They keep voting for people who they KNOW FOR A FACT will cheat them and hurt them. The do this in small matters and large ones. They will go through an immense amount… Read more »
Don Facundo
Guest

This is a nice thing that’s happening here! The fine discussion above is a breathe of fresh air which is a rarity as of late. It’s very much unlike when both GRP Cheerleaders and Yellow Trolls dominate it with their usual praise/assault commentaries.

interxavier
Guest

Slightly off-topic but I’d like to comment on the technical aspects of the comment section in GRP:

It would be great if you modify it or just use Disqus. It’s rather awkward to type long comments without formatting tools and confusing to keep track of who you are quoting and replying to.

mrericx
Guest

I would like to leave my tweet message to you for the sake of tomorrow’s National Day of Protest.

And MLQ was right, if we need a true change in our country then you need a radical & a bloody one instead of a political help from America or any foreign countries with just a lip service. You must clean you own backyard & you will learn it in the end.

d_forsaken
Guest

It is impossible to escape the impression that people commonly use false standards of measurement — that they seek power, success and wealth for themselves and admire them in others, and that they underestimate what is of true value in life.

wpDiscuz