Duterte is turning the Philippines back into a REAL southeast Asian country

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Why the sudden interest of the foreign media in the Philippines? It is because they found a bogeyman in its current president, Rodrigo Duterte, to feast upon. Indeed, Duterte is living up to the smear that goes way back to the campaign leading up to the 2016 elections that he is the “Donald Trump of the Far East”. Westerners, after all, are utterly convinced of the undisputed ascendancy of their way of life — where the individual and her entitlement to “human rights” trumps all else.

The Philippines is, of course, the United States’ Mini Me. It is a quaint legacy of American aspirations to create a beacon of democracy in the region to assure a world fearful of the communist onslaught that at least one southeast Asian domino will remain standing as the others (as the thinking at the time went) fell. Many Filipinos continue to cling to the old notion that their duty as a people lies in upholding that mission to be instrumental to the containment of any threat to America’s hegemony in the region.

Times have changed. As we have seen, the ascent to power of Duterte manifests a change in what Filipinos consider to be the good of their society. Duterte replaces that traditional “good” long considered to be embodied by the “victors” in the 1986 “people power revolution” now known simply as “the Yellows”. Duterte won on the back of mass disillusionment over the broken promise of 1986 that was 30 years in the slow making. Under the Yellows, liberalist democracy was perverted beyond all recognition and turned into nothing more than a pillar that propped up an expanded class of oligarchs that consolidated and concentrated power in Imperial Manila.

Duterte is turning the Philippines back into a true southeast Asian country. He is, in effect, attempting to address the root cause of a national identity crisis suffered by Filipinos over the last three decades. Southeast Asia is home to autocratic “democracies” — states that have, one way or another, found a balance between outwardly being what the West think the world’s nations ought to be and, from the inside, being what they really are.

This is the confusion evident in how foreign media is currently “reporting” the situation in the Philippines. Its sources of information for these “reports” are the corporate media minions of the Yellows — self-anointed “heroes” of free speech that have used that lofty status to hypnotise an entire society. Was it Duterte that snapped Filipinos out of that state of hypnosis? More likely it was the failed administration of former President Benigno Simeon ‘BS’ Aquino III that did the job and paved the way for Duterte’s rise to power.

Either way, it does not matter now. What matters is the future under Duterte’s government. De La Salle University professor Antonio Contreras wrote in a Facebook post how Duterte now presents his people with “a breath of empowering uncertainty that creates spaces for us to redefine ourselves, our politics, our international relations.”

Change is, of course, uncomfortable. In the case of what is happening to the Philippines today, it comes across as confronting to what some have called the disente (“decent”) classes who have, hook line and sinker, embraced the American Way of “human rights”. For the first time in a long time, perhaps, we are confronted with the uncomfortable possibility that there are alternatives to this dogma. Contreras writes…

For once, we have a President that forces us to recalibrate, to re-examine our friendships with the US, to deconstruct the alien elements of a very individualistic human rights construct in the face of our cultural nuances as a communalistic society where rights are seen not as individual entitlements but in the context of social relationships.

This, it seems, is the reason that, at the grassroots, Filipinos fundamentally do not have a problem with Duterte. The problem, as is becoming ever more evident, lies with an oligarchic class unwilling to give change a chance.

This change, after all, requires doing things differently. What, after all, has liberal democratic ideals delivered to the average Filipino? It is this lack of results at the levels in Philippine society where voters are most numerous that the oligarchic classes that are in the midst of a shrilly crying Bloody Extrajudicial Killing! seem to be oblivious to. Instead, their Taliban-like adherence to the artefacts of Western imperialism have put them out of sync with the pulse of Philippine society at large. To continue to apply the same methods and expect different results is, quite simply, a sad form of insanity. Change, therefore, should involve a courageous embrace of diffent approaches.

Unfortunately, this small elite clique of disente change-averse Filipinos control a vast information dissemination industry that they are now desperately using to cobble together a power base to re-launch their bid to re-take the top government posts they regard as theirs by birthright and pedigree. In this context, it is understandable why foreign media are complicit in this undertaking — because the very ideologies upon which their industries have also been founded is being put to the test in the Philippines.

But to be truly southeast Asian is to grow and develop according to one’s sovereign terms. This is how Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia did it. And this is how Vietnam and the other new Indochinese members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are doing it. Duterte is showing Filipinos an option that, in all ironies, never occurred to them — that it can be done the southeast Asian way. The American Way was a fun ride in Disneyland. But to prosper in the manner that only southeast Asia does, the Philippines needs to go back to the basics and start planting rice.

When Filipinos learn to once again keep busy with the business of producing stuff and being independent, the shrill “human rights” slogans of The Huffington Post and The Economist will fade into mere background noise — sources of quaint intellectual amusement for the irrelevant disente crowd as they tap their self-important tweets on their iPads while sipping their Starbucks lattes.

[Photo courtesy Suara.com.]

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Post Author: benign0

benign0 is the Webmaster of GetRealPhilippines.com.

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112 Comments on "Duterte is turning the Philippines back into a REAL southeast Asian country"

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DeluxeTea
Guest
The color yellow is usually a sign of sickness and should be expunged. The body releases yellow snot and phlegm if we have a respiratory illness. Our skin and eyes turn yellowish due to jaundice, which is a symptom of hepatitis. Urine is yellow-colored because it contains waste products that could make us sick if it remained inside us. Abcess (or nana) means an infection. Rotting flesh becomes yellow before turning black. What does this all mean? In the comparison above, if the Philippines is the human body, then the Liberal Party is the one making our country sick and… Read more »
Dave
Guest

Bananas are nice though.

Aphetsky Lasa
Guest

You mean yellow bananas. But even delicious yellow bananas turn black when overripe.

Dice
Guest

“Bananas are nice though.”

No, they aren’t. That is if we’re referring to the lame excuse of a government Aquino had — but I doubt it. I don’t think you’re intelligent enough to understand the metaphor.

tribu tagabawa
Guest

he was referring to a human body not any other thing..and so ur argument is immaterial

mrericx
Guest
yes, yellow is a dangerous color for the development of our country. Maybe its time to change the colors of the 3 stars & a sun on our national flag w/c is the color yellow. So what will be the best alternative color of yellow especially that we need to change the colors of 3 stars & a sun on our watawat but retains the red, white & blue w/c it’ll be the color symbol of national change & awakening? I do believe the best color for the 3 stars & a sun, imho will be the color green w/c… Read more »
Coobie
Guest

Nah, no green. (Honestly, it’d look garish.) Just replace the sun and stars combo with a ring of stars, to symbolize federalism.

Pallacertus
Guest

It’s also the color of sunlight, of optimism (something people here are wary of), of happiness and wisdom (at least in China), and of caution and ambivalence.

What does this all mean? That building boogeymen out of colors is bullshit? Perhaps.

DeluxeTea
Guest

I’d tell you about how different shades of a certain color can mean many different things, but your reading and comprehension abilities are so poor that you missed the part right at the very beginning where I avoided generalizing the entire color by mentioning “The color yellow is usually a sign of sickness”.

Felipe
Guest
Interesting how much outpour of sympathy & concern are being given to drug criminals—-“human rights” they say, whilst the poor hapless rape, murder, & robbery victims of these criminals are being silenced as they attack the one President who finally has the real balls to speak out, defend, & fight for these victims, past to future. What show of urgency and manner of sympathy & concern are these so-called “human rights” whiners giving to these victims of heinous drug crimes?—Nothing!—-I don’t hear any effective solution coming out from that camp to rid ourselves of this drug problem. The former DOJ… Read more »
Pallacertus
Guest
“Interesting how much outpouring of sympathy & concern are being given to drug criminals—-“human rights” they say, whilst the poor hapless rape, murder, & robbery victims of these criminals are being silenced as they attack the one President who finally has the real balls to speak out, defend, & fight for these victims, past to future.” As far as I’m concerned, I’m as anxious for the criminal as I am for his victim. Just as I want the victim treated for his wounds (physical or psychical) and be rehabilitated and be made a responsible law-abiding member of society as compassion… Read more »
Shyguy
Guest

It’s disgusting how a majority of Filipinos, including their president/furer, really has a twisted understanding of human rights. It seems their motto was: “if criminals can kill anyone, why can’t I?”

If there is such a thing as rape culture, these people (dutertards and the likes) must have a “murder culture”. Such a sick society you got there!

Carta
Guest

It is even more sicker in other country just imagine working in a country with so many people with mental problems. Most is related to drugs not even the country can do anything about it. They keep putting the victims to mental facility but they never tried to eliminate or curb their most common root problem Illegal drugs. They are a powerful country but they have the most patients with mental problems. I guess you already know which country it is. Protect the innocent not the criminals incase you are still a human.

Klara
Guest

What the yellow essentially represents is an abandonment of our national identity. And it’s not just with Filipinos. Look around. On an individual basis, once you lose a sense of self identity, there’s nothing worth fighting for. What one does then would only be for self interest-something the LP epitomizes and their yellow mentality.

999Hyden007Toro9999.999
Guest
999Hyden007Toro9999.999

Pres. Duterte is changing our country. Foreigners should stay out , in meddling in the internal affairs of the Philippines.

The U.N. should go to Iraq and Syria, where the ISIS caliphate is murdering thousands of people. Subjugating infidel women as sex slaves…

We can solve our own problems, without foreign help. The U.S. should stop in making the Filipinos their Clones…we cannot be “Little Brown Americans”…we are searching our own national identity, lost due to colonization.

The War on Drugs, can be won on our own terms…not from foreign countries terms !

So, stay out from the Philippines !

Robert Haighton
Member

Hyden,
I really hope you will be consistent when there is another major typhoon hitting your country. I hope you have the gutz to send all foreign aid back home the minute they set foot in your country. And not only physical aid but also financial and medical.

Apprentice
Guest

We will do our best to depend on ourselves for the rebuilding don’t worry po 🙂

Robert Haighton
Member

Apprentice,
baed on what do you make your statement?
Your history doesnt speak in favor of your statement.
Oh, I know, you can only help yourself NOW bec of Duterte. Is that it?
Duterte is still busy killing drug addicts and -pushers. So far, I havent read any good plan(s) about the future for PH.

115Hyden007Toro9999.999
Guest
115Hyden007Toro9999.999

Robert Haighton:

Those foreign calamity aids were stolen by our thieving politicians, anyway.

The multi million U.S. dollars aid, for the building of houses of the Yolanda typhoon victims was stolen by Aquino and Mar Roxas and their cahoots…

We welcome foreign aid, but no strings attached !

We are grateful for the help, but please give the funds to the right channels, where they will go to the victims; and not to the pockets of the thieves !

Robert Haighton
Member

Hyden,
there is no such thing as a ‘free lunch’. And besides, you can clean up your own mess, as you stated yourself very clearly.
So pls send ALL aid back to their country. Only then you are consistent.

Dice
Guest

And, I think Duterte is so busy drafting good plans so a Robert Haighton would have his dose of sanctimony.

fe relampagos
Guest

sir by trying to re establish our own identity it does not
mean cutting our frienship with uour country, we just need to rewstablish our own identity dor the next generation to stand with their head up high and not subservient to any foreign interferences as far as our internal affairs are concerned, let us be what we want to be.

234Toro007Hyden9999.999
Guest
234Toro007Hyden9999.999

@Robert Haighton:

If you give aid to us, with “strings attached”…you can keep your aid ! It is not an aid, but a “tool of manipulation”, for your self serving purposes…

Even, if we eat once a day; and live under a tree…we can manage…

As I had said most of the aids and donated funds, were stolen by Aquino, Mar Roxas and their cahoots.

Arrest these thieving people, take them in your country…torture them until they give back to you, what they had stolen !

I hope, I will be crystal clear on this issue !

Robert Haighton
Member

Hyden,
I understood you immediately.

But it would yield and render far more appreciation and respect, if/when you say:
“we dont need your aid, we dont want your aid. We will manage on our own. Thank you”.

I am very sorry to say but in my country we dont torture people.

Robert Haighton
Member
Fe, how much time do you (the Philipppine population) need to (re)establish who you are? The Spaniards are gone many lunches ago, the Americans are gone many dinners ago. To establish who you are is that subject to who your president is? So now under Duterte you feel free again, you really feel you again? Pls, come on, give me a break. In less than 6 years from now, Duterte is gone and who will be next on that seat? Then you have to re-establish yourself again? As mentioned many times here in GRP, the Philippines has a mediocre mindset… Read more »
Hildergarde Hamhocker
Guest
Hildergarde Hamhocker
For typhoon Yolanda aid was given to the Philippines by many nations. Actually the U K gave more than any one else at $150 Mil US dollars, while both Australia AND the USA gave US$ 100 million each but those 3 countries also provided the troops, the machinery the rebuiling of communities, the fresh water, the supply of food, shelter and the other requirements that a disaster response required….The Philippines did not and could not THEN OR NOW do it for themselves and when disaster happens and countries step in to save the people then that country should be perpared… Read more »
Elaine
Guest

We might just do that too. Why not? We can test how much we can bear by facing odds by ourselves. We might be all surprised how strong and resilient the Filipinos are.

454Toro007Hyden999.999
Guest
454Toro007Hyden999.999

@Robert Haighton:

I do not like people to put words into my mouth…I stand for what I wrote, 101%…

Regarding torture, you can grab Aquino, Mar Roxas and the other Typhoon Yolanda Fund thieves…send them to ISIS Caliphate in Syria. Let the ISIS Jihadists torture them; put them in cages to be paraded like animals in public; cut their hands, because they are thieves; burn them; drown them; and finally cut their heads off !

Nathan
Guest

Giving an aid doesn’t mean controlling the recepient. If you ask to be repaid, then it’s called loan. The point here is for foreign nations not interfere with the internal affairs of the Philippines.

David
Guest
I don’t know about you, but I’m not going to keep giving you a “handout” if I can’t meddle in your business to find out why you can’t stand on your own two feet. If all Filipinos feel the same way you do, then I guess it’s time for the Philippines to tell the United Nation to “take a hike” and start going at it alone. Then let’s wait and see how they will handle the next natural calamity, disaster, and political strife on their own. I’ll grab the popcorn and you grab the drinks. This should be an interesting… Read more »
Nathan
Guest

@David.
Suit yourself.

David
Guest

You need to tell that to all Filipinos on what they want to happen.

Nathan
Guest

Not all Filipinos share the idea of the current government, just like the government of yours. Our president has 91% approval rating, so do the math of how many are in favor on how he is running this country. You might be talking to the elite few.

David
Guest
@Nathan, You make as much sense as a drunk trying to walk in a straight line with your last comment. Why are you comparing my government to your government? They don’t even have the same problems. Just because 91% of your population approved what Duterte is doing today, it doesn’t’ mean they completely understand what he is doing; or, will they still continue to agree with him days, weeks, months, even years from now? I believe the Filipino people are just looking for a change, any change, that will break the status quo of the past 30 years—just like the… Read more »
Hildergarde Hamhocker
Guest
Hildergarde Hamhocker

To allow you SOME scope to understand the truth: Eligible voter turnout was 56 million…Duterete gets 14.7 mil votes..next closet candidate gets 14.3 mil votes….ok that means qute SIMPLY THAT 75% OF VOTERS did not WANT HIM……………………………………….how does any one make a case for a majority of voters votingfor him..simply was NOT true!

Tell It Like It Is....
Guest
Tell It Like It Is....

@ ROB, This article is funny,yes? ‘Duterte is changing’…..into ‘What it really is’, REALLY? The Philippines is a third world hell-hole and nothing has changed except the deaths of a few thousand druggies. WHAT IS THIS, A FEEL GOOD FUZZY MOMENT? GET REAL? WHAT? WAKE UP, YOUR DREAMING….

OOPS, my bad, Filipino’s are now independent, free thinking, wealthy socialites……my bad,really, my bad…

Dee
Guest

Everything has a price. You give some, you get some. Nothing’s free in this world

888_888
Guest

Remember you have a freedom to help. But were not brainless, if we need help and you offer help, we let you in. BUT if were not asking help and you offer??? What you gonna expect???

David
Guest
@888_888. If you’re not brainless, then you should realize that there’s “no such thing as a free lunch.” If someone gives you something, you better believe they’re going to want something back. If the Filipinos have any sense of dignity and “class,” whatever is offered to them as a handout should be refused with a big “NO!” and say to the giver, “we can handle our own affairs by ourselves.” That’s not what’s happening to the “patay-gutom” (gluttonous) Philippine society. Filipinos will take everything they can get their hands, without sharing it with each each other, and refuse to reciprocate… Read more »
David
Guest

“Hands on,” that is.

Robert Haighton
Member
888, after PH’s last natural disaster (Typhoon Yolanda) a fundraising was organized on Dutch national TV (No, not local TV but national TV). I cant remember exactly how much money was raised donated by the Dutch public/people but it must have been in the millions of Euros (€). No one gives money to expect something back in/for causes like these. We hope that it will reach the aeras where it is needed and the money is used wisely and efficiently. A few weeks after that fundraising it came to light that the Dutch people are getting tired of donating money… Read more »
IKARROS
Guest

FYI Sir most of the alledged Foreign Donations whether in Cash or in Kind never reached the victims of Typhoon Haiyan. It was looted by the Corrupt Officials of the previous Administration. No need to send back those Donations anyway coz it did not reached the intended party.

Thanks and no thanks the victims are still languishing in misery until now.

Robert Haighton
Member

Ikarros,
The moment I donate money, it is out of my hands. Not only literally but also metaphorically.
It is transferred from my bank account to the bank account of the organization/institution.
Then it is used to buy goods (mostly) and those goods are shipped to the aera. And probably handed over to the local authority.

The fact that the (international) organization doesnt know that those local authorities are corrupt, sounds very stupid to me. But I read aout it before.
I think – more or less – happened in Haïti (earthquake).

andrew
Guest

don’t call other people “sir”. say “robert”.

jeanette
Guest

anyway in every aid that is given to the Philippines there is always a string attached to it so I would say that the new president should be wary with so called aid

Aizel
Guest

if you are one of those kind hearted who helped out the needy without expecting anything in return. Thank you for being an instrument and may God bless you more!

Robert Haighton
Member

Aizel,
I dont give ‘fish’ (money or goods or both) to the needy. I teach them how to (catch) fish for themselves so that they dont need me anymore to help them out in the future.
Or I will leave them behind altogether.

Sorry, but I am not religious. So your godly words go in vain.

DeluxeTea
Guest

Robert, are you living in the Philippines? If you are, we’ll send you back first. 🙂

Boy Gutom
Guest

I’m hungry.

Charot
Guest

Philippines is on BBC World News now almost every night …which surprise me.

Aeta
Guest

BBC needs controversy, parody, and comedy in its news program.

234Toro007Hyden9999.999
Guest
234Toro007Hyden9999.999

BBC is a British Network…maybe De Lima contacted them; and gave disinformation to them…all foreign news networks…please refrain from interfering in the political affairs of the Philippines. We can solve our own problems !

I request all foreign news network, to contact the Office of Public Information, of Pres. Duterte…and not consume the disinformation from Aquino, De Lima, Porky Drilon, Mar Roxas, Hontiveros, Trillanes, Leni Robredo, etc…

These evil people are tools of the Chinese Triad Drug Mafia crime syndicate , operating in the Philippines !

Elaine
Guest
They may have hired PR people to discredit our new President and our country. They cannot win the Filipino people so they want the international community to exert pressure so they could bring down our government. They are that poweful. Let’s not despair, we are Filipinos. We can get back our country and rebuild it again. We can change the mess of previous administrations left unchecked like drugs and corruptions. All we have to do is to be more balder and engaged in facing these problems head on. With prayers and active involvement in our cause for change we can… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

I never knew the Philippines was “a REAL southeast Asian country.” I’ve always thought of it as the Mexico of the Far East, complete with hand-me-down religion, government, and way of life from the west—where the people think like Spanish aristocrats and behave like Americans. This means Duterte will have to kill everybody, including himself, to erase everything that has defined the Philippines for centuries and start all over.

234Toro007Hyden9999.999
Guest
234Toro007Hyden9999.999

We are now almost the same as Mexico…a Narco State. The Mexican Army has taken over the Mexican Police; because the Mexican Police is controlled by the Mexican Drug Cartel. Almost all Mexican Politicians are controlled by the Mexican Drug cartel !

We have almost the same brainwashed mind; done by the Spanish colonizers…the Americans grabbed half of their country, with the American program of “Minifest Destiny”…in truth, the Americans want more lands, to have as many as African slaves, to work on these lands…

gnogid
Guest
Let me play a devil’s advocate a see if we can strike a balance in the conversation. I don’t think foreign media got a sudden interest in the country because they found a bogeyman in Pres. Duterte. The country attracts attention from foreign media because we have, to say the least, an unconventional and controversial president. The smoke of the 2016 campaign has been gone after the last tally of the result was announced. Not a whimper of protest came from those who lost the election. But there is an emerging feeling even before he was declared the election winner… Read more »
Elaine
Guest
Ha ha ha! How much? if you really are a Filipino you must be one of those that had been benefited for so long by the old patronage and oligarchic driven system. If you really are a Filipino you would not be so blind how bad is our problem that this new President is trying to address. Maybe you are one of those that had been so used to black propaganda and posturing of previous politicians you cannot see real public service. Thank God for socmed! If we were still left with our oligarchic owned and paid media we would… Read more »
etretud
Guest

Points c and d. Please. Just admit to being a yellow apologist. Thank you.

LOL
Guest
Just how sure are you that grace’s votes would’ve gone straight through Roxas? Now that you said that he’s weak and blablabla. Its interesting that your tallying of issues for the current dude up at the palace are the ones that the media already carved up and shoved down the public’s current non-believing throats. Its also interesting that you didn’t leave any hints of noy and mar being in cahoots with drug businessmen when even the Inquirer reported of something noy did that was pretty much unconstitutional (sudden burning of certain papers/documents in Malacanang that the media never bothered to… Read more »
marius
Guest
I don’t know what “real southeast asian country” really means. Was there a fake one? Those countries cited (Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia) including Vietnam who is now cozying fast with the US did not develop themselves by going anti-US. And I don’t think strong men such as Lee Kwan Yew, Suharto, among others started their leadership mouthing insults and tirades against anyone much less the leader of the United States. This. i think benign0 underestimates how much the development of the countries he mentions was dependent upon co-operation with the international community in general, and the US specifically. I think… Read more »
gnogid
Guest
Your first paragraph is right on target. ASEAN and/or Southeast Asian countries are primarily pro-west groupings. They do not really aspire to get the US’ goat and be seen as an independently ‘real’. I’m not really sure if Duterte really “fails to understand” the US. All I know is that he knows what he’s doing and he’s determined to pursue it come hell or high water. The only problem on that kind of thinking is every time he creates a controversy or embarrassment he always drag the entire country with him. Which is the last thing we need under his… Read more »
marius
Guest
Reading Duterte, he simply don’t care. He’s done it (rule with an iron fist) in Davao and, by what we are seeing, he’s obviously convinced that there is no difference in the environment. I think he’s very much mistaken. That was my point. The USA is not Davao. Collectively, they are much smarter, and much more practiced at getting what they want. If Duterte think’s he’s Dirty Harry, he’d better remember that the US invented Dirty Harry. Pretty much every military commander on the planet knows that underestimating your enemy is the worst mistake you can make. He probably would… Read more »
gnogid
Guest
Well, unfortunately, that (comparing US to Davao) was NOT my point. My point was, Davao is not the Philippines, hence, I implied that Duterte has to make adjustments, big adjustments, to be able to wiggle his way around his new office. I maybe critical of Pres. Duterte at times but I’m not blind to those things that I think he has a point to stand his ground against. He has a point to express his view on his discomfort when other people questions his war against illegal drugs but I disagree on the manner he expresses his over-reaction by calling… Read more »
marius
Guest
I’m joking but you know what I mean. Again, I’m joking and you know it. I mean it. No, I don’t know what you mean. It really irritates me when Filipinos say something offensive followed by “joke lang!”. In fact, you just did what Duterte did to Obama. It’s not funny and it’s not clever. And to be clear about it, I hate it when people speaks in a threatening manner like what you are doing now. The US is a super power. No need to bully a super weak country like ours. I’m not threatening you, and I’m not… Read more »
gnogid
Guest
What I meant was not funny because what you said was not funny either. In fact, it’s horrible. You are talking down on people you think are not your kind. That is the message you are imparting on your piece. America is good and bad and you perfectly get and know it, hence, we underlings better understand it. The ‘joke’ thing was full of sarcasm and it pass over your head. So sorry. At least, unlike our president, I’m apologizing. I’m not threatening you, and I’m not American. I’m Asian. – marius === Well, Asian what? I’m sure you can… Read more »
marius
Guest
What I meant was not funny because what you said was not funny either. In fact, it’s horrible. It wasn’t supposed to be funny. And yes, the country is horrible. Filipinos deal with that by pretending it isn’t, instead of looking it in the face and dealing with it. Well, Asian what? Just Asian. I don’t “belong” to any country. I’m not somebody’s property. I’ve lived in many different places. Home is where friends and family are. You’re threatening Filipinos like me by wagging the US bogeyman in our face and dictating to us what we should do or else… Read more »
marius
Guest
That’s it for me, pal. You mean you’ve run out of pre-prepared arguments? Doesn’t surprise me: you’ve just repeated the standard list of Pinoy justifications for the country’s failed-state status. I assume these are taught to you in school? Again, my question, why waste your time? If you’re interested (as opposed to just making fun) I’m not wasting my time. You’re actually quite right: I avoid interacting with Filipinos as much as possible. Broadly, there are two types of people who dominate the country: those who act weak, stupid and helpless in the belief that this will make me give… Read more »
gnogid
Guest
There is nothing to be misunderstood. Nothing in what you said about the US is news to me. Even your suggestion that we submit to her because she can do anything possible (mostly bad) against us if we don’t. I also get it that you don’t like Pres. Duterte’s approach towards the US but your approach is as despicable, if not more despicable, than him. You don’t treat us as your vassal. You see cents and dollars, we see respect and cooperation. You see and know more a lot than us about us. You see us as an eight-year-old child… Read more »
Pana
Guest

Marius in some other posts claimed he’s European but now claims he’s an Asian. In reality he’s really an Indian national! I wonder why is he ashamed of his identity?!

gnogid
Guest

gnogid: “Again, my question, why waste your time?”

marius: “You’re actually quite right.”
===
Need I say more? : )

marius
Guest
In reality he’s really an Indian national! Ah, here we go with the ad hominems. Nobody has any rebuttal for my comments, so you’ll go off on some pointless tangent and pretend you’ve won. Pinoy Pride wins the day! OK, fine, Pana. I have a European passport because I was born in a European country. As far as governments are concerned, I’m a European. I am genetically Asian. I don’t have any connection with India. Do you understand now why I said I’m not “from” anywhere? I assume you’re now going to demand exactly which country my passport was issued… Read more »
Daniel Desembrana
Guest

…a communalistic society where rights are seen not as individual entitlements but in the context of social relationships.

china_kooopal
Guest
“Under the Yellows, liberalist democracy was perverted beyond all recognition and turned into nothing more than a pillar that propped up an expanded class of oligarchs that consolidated and concentrated power in Imperial Manila.” …..Under the yellows? huh? how long did gma rule? was she a yellow? is she cozying up to abnoy or duterte? how about fvr? who was behind duterte’s run? erap? how long these nincompoops rule altogether? they were all LP puppets? PLLLLEEEEASE? ABnoy and his cohorts have a lot to answer for but if you are going to argue please put at least a semblance of… Read more »
Tell It Like It Is....
Guest
Tell It Like It Is....

LOL, ‘A Real S. E. Asian country’, what is that exactly? A THIRD WORLD SHITHOLE? It already was a THIRD WORLD SHITHOLE, give it a little time….

….and it will still be a THIRD WORLD SHITHOLE.

Duterte kills a few thousand drug addicts and makes a few crude remarks and all of a sudden the Phailippines is somehow a changed country? Please, poverty is where 33% of the citizenry reside and nothing else has changed, so what is this nonsense?

David
Guest

A “Third World” is too nice of an addition to describe this country. Just call it what it really is: S_ _ th_ _e. (I don’t want to get deleted)

d_forsaken
Guest
Patriotism is a thing difficult to put into words. It is neither precisely an emotion nor an opinion, nor a mandate, but a state of mind — a reflection of our own personal sense of worth, and respect for our roots. Love of country plays a part, but it’s not merely love. Neither is it pride, although pride too is one of the ingredients. Patriotism is a commitment to what is best inside us all. And it’s a recognition of that wondrous common essence in our greater surroundings — our school, team, city, state, our immediate society — often ultimately… Read more »
allan
Guest

awesome article!!!!

Greg
Guest
Hopefully there can be progress in the Philippines – but not without a systemic change in values from the top down. The Philippines ought to be able to improve – but this is contingent upon good policies, honesty, ending corruption and laws be followed. I am doubtful Duterte can change things; further, what will happen next election? If he can make significant changes( infrastructure, proper funding of departments, end corruption) then the country may move toward a better direction. Referring to previous comments regarding foreign typhoon aid, other countries will donate and the pera will be stolen as usual. I… Read more »
BABYLON AND ON...
Guest
@ LEG, NO, the HATRED you think you see is a charade. The politicians are all in it together and take turns ‘shaming’ each other in the media and even investigating each other in useless ‘BLUE-RIBBON’ panels that start off with a BANG and fizzle out and amount to ZIPPO. Look at GMA, she was ‘PERSECUTED’ and ,according to GRP here, was thrown in ‘jail’, but that is NOT TRUE,GMA LOST NOTHING, no money was ever returned and GMA even kept her seat in Congress and spent not 10 minutes in that ‘hospital room’. Same with E-CRAP who was supossedly… Read more »
gnogid
Guest

“…..what will happen next election?”
=====
That’s a $64 million dollar question. I don’t think Duterte is thinking of stepping down after his term is up. He sees himself as the one who will solve all our problems. And that is the problem.

Elaine
Guest
Wow! Unbelievable! Where did you get that idea that he wants to stay in power forever? President Duterte does not even want to run last election. He many Filipinos begged him to run to change our dire situation. He has done a great service to his city, Davao. People there love him because of everything that he has accomplished there. He never enriched himself out of the public funds. Aside from restoring peace and order, he was able to forge peace in his city with the NPAs, and the Moro rebels. I can enumerate a lot of the things that… Read more »
gnogid
Guest
“Wow! Unbelievable! Where did you get that idea that he wants to stay in power forever?” – Elaine ===== Where did I get the idea? Pres. Duterte himself. Here’s the source: Duterte eyes abolition of Congress if elected president in 2016 http://www.philstar.com/nation/2015/01/26/1416721/duterte-eyes-abolition-congress-if-elected-president-2016 Duterte on governance: You have to be ‘like’ a dictator http://www.rappler.com/nation/politics/elections/2016/125542-duterte-governance-like-dictator “President Duterte does not even want to run last election.” – Elaine ===== You sure? Well, almost all candidates in every elected public position “don’t want to run”. Nobody wants to run until god, the angels their conscience, the people, their destiny, their long deceased love-ones finally… Read more »
Francisco C. de Asis
Guest

It’s funny to call this country a liberal democracy in substance. The president is all powerful chief that control lots of the power. The Congress is suppose to be a co-equal branch, but in reality join the new chief’s rule and are basically lackeys. There isn’t substantive loyal opposition to keep the President in check and this has been this way long before Duterte became president.
Provincial and local government is mostly controlled by the ‘chiefs” and marching off to the ballot exercise is in most cases just like a shadow play, lots of sauce and no substance.

a yellow tard
Guest

hey guys! is Marcos burial at the LNMB democratic? a one’s defeat in a final battle between democracy vs communism?

a yellow tard
Guest

de lima might attend the probe against her to block all accusations on her. that’s her delaying tactics still hoping president duterte will be impeach. what she didn’t know impeaching the president is they’re impeaching themselves at the senate all yellows.

a yellow tard
Guest

they must finished the probe in one day to be able to move on the war on drugs.

a yellow tard
Guest

they must hear all the witness one by one and no blocking tactics should be allowed.

a yellow tard
Guest

early in this video she thinks she could ran away on her crimes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-nxzjEGXwZs

Sick N. Tired
Guest

Since The anti-Duterte group cannot manipulate the people within the country, they are trying to appeal and manipulate the International community. Bravo!!! Lame lame lame… Now that the Abi Sayyaf released their last victim NOBODY CARED TO REPORT THE GOOD NEWS huh? Sad souls…

David
Guest

“Let’s have more respect for other people’s opinion.” Right, benignO? Those were your words.

Bodik Baniqued
Guest

The only thing I hate about what the writer wrote is when he called Duterte as “Donald Trump” of the country.
First, he is way too different from Trump and this Presodent has a heart while the other doesn’t have any!
You say he is a new bogey man – one who has his own brand and what’s the intention to make him a “copy” of Trump?

Let’s be consistent in what we write.

David
Guest

Personally, I suspect Duterte is the “Donald Trump” of the Muslim world. This slowly breaking ties with the United States and cozying up with China is just a front to low-ball the Filipino people–and the international community–to continue to support his agenda of being an “independent Asian country.”

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