Why A Parliamentary Shift Advocacy Has ‘Lost It’

culture changeIt’s not so much the concept of a parliamentary form of government, but the manner in which one group chooses to push for it that has gotten the larger online Filipino community linking arms against it.

Tsk tsk. Weak arguments, kilometric tirades, and focus on personal attacks are signs of a creeping desperation in this “movement” to sell “Constitutional Reform” on the basis of a quaint acronym and a strong predisposition to badger those who only seek to challenge its basic principles.” — Benign0

I am not against the idea of a Philippine parliamentary form of government because I can see where it could actually make things easier — having worked with more than half a dozen elected politicians over the past decade and a half.

However, what IS at issue is the misguided and abrasive militancy with which it is being pushed by a certain group.  If at all the group sincerely believes in the merits of a parliamentary form of government, it should heed this nut of wisdom when it comes to gaining supporters: “It’s not who you are or what you say, it’s how you make people feel.”

How can people support the cause of a group that openly resorts to defaming people’s character in public space for merely asking questions about the theoretical assumptions that underlie the group’s cause?

Compounding the group leader’s utter lack of understanding, wisdom, and knowledge of Philippine politics on the ground is a dangerous mix of intellectual dilettantism and persistent political naivete covered up deftly by an ability to recall trivia and mimic accents.

The leader of the group brags of being politically connected to the powers that be and claims to be pushing for political change but hasn’t managed to get enough “balls” together to make a REAL push as a registered political organization — at least in this year’s election.

How can you take such a movement seriously when it hasn’t put anything at stake?

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Post Author: Paul Farol

Try not to take me too seriously.

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79 Comments on "Why A Parliamentary Shift Advocacy Has ‘Lost It’"

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Amir Al Bahr
Guest

Paul,
With regards to leadership, the gurus espouse another piece of advice:

“People buy into the leader before they buy into the vision.”

Johnny Derp
Guest

It’s ironic how Mr. Dumdum tries to present himself as being an intellectual when in reality all he does is spout ad hominems and false accusations against Mr. Farol.
Like I said before, that kind of behavior is not different from the desperate malacanang trolls that attack this site fruitlessly.

libertas
Guest

Without leadership the ‘movement’ will be flushed down the toilet.
It has no traction, no respect and clearly no skills in marketing or diplomacy.
When a message gets lost in banality and irrelevances, and when there is not the intellectual rigour or logical argument it simply becomes an irrelevance.
Serious debate needs serious people, not self-delusional clowns or comedians who make themselves look foolish – enough of those already in politics.

Boots Abad
Guest

We take exception to the manner in which CoRRECT has undertaken the shift to a parliamentary form of government.

balak ubak
Guest

the sad thing is that dumdum appears to be attracting quite a number of idealistic kids who think the manner by which he promotes his ideas (some of which i agree with) is the correct way.

as an advocacy group, there is nothing correct about how they’re going about it.

i just hope none of his misguided supporters end up doing things of a criminal nature. i strongly hope no one follows in dumdum’s footsteps. otherwise, this country would be screwed.

benign0
Admin
The behaviour of the members of this “movement” exhibit a lot of parallels with the Hitler Youth back in the bad old days. Young, impressionable, idealistic — even intelligent — but unfortunately lacking enough depth of experience to apply advanced cognitive skills that allow one to step back from their own comfort zone and regard with an open mind whether one’s own thinking is in bad need of a reality check. Notice that a lot of the online forums associated with this movement are CLOSED groups. This indicates a lack of any inclination to be transparent in the internal discussions.… Read more »
benign0
Admin

Sound coming from our Spam folder: BURP.

😀

Amir Al Bahr
Guest

BURP or BLECH?

Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Shouldn’t Orion be working at around this time?

libertas
Guest

Reading dumdum’s rants and chaotic thinking it seems he needs to grow up.
Certainly no intellectual, just an obsessive and an obnoxious one at that.

“It is impossible to practice parliamentary politics without having patience, decency, politeness and courtesy”
Khaleda Zia

Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Good that you mentioned that and it seems at least Dumdum, their leader, can’t practice what they’re preaching.

Who’d trust them? Not me.

libertas
Guest

who would follow them! – not even a retarded sheep with masochistic tendencies

Louis
Guest
“I have said my piece. I say again what we need is not regime change, or change to parliamentary, but a change in our culture, a change in our hearts and minds, in our nature, in our character. The nation heals best when it heals it�s poor and downtrodden. We need a pealing of bells in the night that we might all wake up. If we don�t, what difference is there � really? Between those who colonized and conquered us, and robbed us of our pride and dignity, and our present masters, the Filipino rich and powerful? They too would… Read more »
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Certainly, it’s not the only hypothesis and we don’t ram it down people’s throats.

Johnny Saint
Guest
Louis, I think you misinterpret the message. READ Teddy Benigno’s whole essay in the Philippine Star. http://getrealphilippines.com/legacy/agr-disagr/12-5-parliament.html The argument is NOT that we shouldn’t amend the constitution in favor of some purely theoretical or academic approach to effecting change. His position is that without making the corresponding changes in Filipino culture, the shift to a parliamentary system of government is a pointless exercise. Benigno goes further, citing evidence that cultural factors had more to do in transforming our neighbors’ societies than the strict adherence to a parliamentary democracy. If we were to make the shift today to a parliamentary system,… Read more »
benign0
Admin

A good analogy is an article I wrote about the implementation of the use of roundabouts (rotondas) in the Philippines. Its proponents insisted that this new system promised to improve traffic flow in Manila’s streets.

Unfortunately, they failed to appreciate that the roundabout system hinges on motorists’ abilities to follow simple rules — something Pinoys are renowned for sucking at. Without this key ingredient, implementing roundabouts on Manila’s streets would’ve caused more chaos.

In short, New System plus Old Bulok Culture equals Certain Disaster as the late Teddy Benigno himself pointed out.

Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Here’s something interesting about culture change and it doesn’t involve teaching pigeons how to guide a missile.

http://www.sophia.org/why-cultures-change-the-four-main-factors-tutorial

The article identifies 4 factors:

1. Technology
2. Change in the environment (or perhaps this should be climate)
3. New ideas
4. Diffussion

Johnny Saint
Guest

You’ll probably have a better chance at teaching a pigeon to pilot a guided missile than to have Filipinos suddenly change if, tomorrow morning, the country wakes up to a Prime Minister instead of a President.

Johnny Saint
Guest
And if anybody still has doubts about Filipino driving, all you have to do is sit yourself down at the corner of Quezon Avenue that flows into the Quezon City Circle. You won’t have to wait five minutes before you notice a vehicle — probably a jeepney — suddenly cut across lanes without bothering to signal. Much to the chagrin, screams and honking of other motorists. Also — just observe vehicles that try to switch lanes at any one of the MMDA’s U-turn boondoggles. Chances are you’ll find cars occupying two lanes lining up to make a U-turn. With public… Read more »
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Roxas had a good analogy for the Presidential and Parliamentary form of governments. The Presidential Form of government we have right now, he said, is like a jeep. It’s slow and it has poor handling (ability to maneuver quickly). The Parliamentary Form of government is like a Ferrari, Roxas said. It is fast and can make turns quickly. Now, here’s the thing. Think of the common Pinoy jeepney driver and then consider putting him in a Ferrari. For all it’s flaws, the Presidential form of government as we have it right now, I think, is good enough for this infantile… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
I don’t think it was about “training wheels.” When America’s founding fathers decided to form a republic they certainly had the opportunity to form a parliamentary system based on English law. But they opted for a bicameral system that was inefficient by design. This was intentional for the very reasons that they revolted against the English King. They wanted to remove the possibility of a TYRANNY. American colonists first asked for greater representation in Parliament; “No taxation without representation” became their mantra. When it became clear that this was never going to be the case, the 13 colonies seceded from… Read more »
Orion Pérez Dumdum
Guest
What you didn’t realize is that when the United States of America came up with their Presidential System, the founding fathers recognized the fact that the masses were likely to be petty and personality-oriented rather than issues-oriented. That’s why they came up with the ELECTORAL COLLEGE which, if you think carefully, acts like a Parliamentary System in the sense that the Electoral College is like a parallel “Congress” whose representatives are tasked purely to choose the President and Vice President. The Founding Fathers created that system precisely because they were afraid of chaos and mob-rule which is what characterizes the… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
Clarification of the US Electoral College system: The Electoral College was created as a compromise for the presidential election process. How did this come about? In 1787, the US Founding Fathers, based on their direct knowledge of history showing that unlimited power tends to become tyrannical power, created the United States as a republic — not a pure democracy. However, the Framers of the Constitution wanted to make sure the people were given direct input in choosing their leaders and saw two ways to accomplish this: 1. The people of the entire nation would vote for and elect the president… Read more »
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Mr. Dumdum, stop embarrassing yourself. Kawawa naman ang pamilya mo dito.

johndoenymous@gmail.com
Guest
johndoenymous@gmail.com

I agree with CoRRECT’s first two points, get more investors and allow each region to make themselves grow.

As for the last one, I really don’t care because there will be no change if the people keep voting the same crooks or idiots as their representatives.

Sure, a parliamentary system has advantages over a presidential system, but changing the game will not affect the behaviors of the players and spectators. Possibly, this may incite problems as Filipinos seem to have an aversion to change.

libertas
Guest
Horses for courses Aside from an academic debate a parliamentary system is not a solution to the current political malaise, economic inequalities and social stratification which is firmly rooted in a culture reinforced over generations. Putting the cart before the horse only creates more problems and does not address the root causes in a structured or pragmatic manner. Addressing the economic provisions within the constitution is a more pragmatic, achievable and beneficial goal, but itself is only one aspect of much needed change Transformational management provides insights which can equally apply to political change. -Strategy precedes structure -Culture determines success… Read more »
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

I still think that the constitutional reform route towards prosperity is the long route, but I am not opposed to it.

Prosperity is really the individual’s look out and not society’s. It is a personal mission more than an entitlement arising from some mandate.

Orion Pérez Dumdum
Guest
It becomes a “long route” if people like you keep opposing it without even understanding it. Right now, you have realized that Constitutional Reform is necessary since I am noticing that you now realize that you cannot issue any rebuttals against it. However, your problem is a problem of ego. You don’t like the fact that I have defeated you in every single debate we’ve had in the past, and you don’t like the fact that whenever you insulted me, I returned the favour with you losing because my retaliatory attacks proved extremely hurtful to you which means I won.… Read more »
benign0
Admin

Check this out..

That’s what’s so wrong about you, Farol. And now you initiate stupid articles like this one in order to defame me. And then when I launch a counter-attack again, you always get “pikon” and start issuing threats. What a loser. You started it, you idiot.

The guy does not even know what he’s talking about.

Where specifically in this article has any defamatory statement been made about you, Mr DumDum? The only defamatory words I see is in your above comment where you call Paul an “idiot”.

libertas
Guest

With jinkee pacquaio as vice-governor, and in another province, the 24 year old wakeboarder son of the local dynasty elected as governor maybe this layer of bureaucracy/expense/corruption could be dispensed with completely.

Maclibid
Guest

How do we fix the dysfunctional culture if that is the problem?

MidwayHaven
Guest

I suppose the most basic step would be self-discipline. It would be hard to actually fix anything if one would not have a sense of focus.

Maclibid
Guest

How will the common masa acquire self-discipline? It’s hard to acquire that without a reward/punishment system.

Johnny Saint
Guest

LIFE will be the ultimate reward and/or punishment. You learn soon enough that if you don’t acquire the necessary skills, the world has a very harsh way of reminding you that your survival is at stake.

MidwayHaven
Guest

You just answered your own question. 🙂

Johnny Saint
Guest
The answer is simple. It’s so old, it’s a cliché. We hear the word EDUCATION bandied about, it’s almost lost meaning but this is the real answer at the grassroots level. Making the general public aware of all sides of an issue. Not just the points of view that Malacañang or its propagandist media want you to ingest. Disseminating information and the tools to dissect that knowledge to enable readers to decide for themselves. Through outlets like GRP. I heard about a study from Georgetown University that concluded that instead of voting, you could post a status update on Facebook… Read more »
ChinoF
Member

My new article on Sense of Entitlement offers one solution: just drop the attitude.

Kenneth
Guest

Changing from Presidential to Parliamentary is quite like changing the course of the ants path. Change their course and all ants go in chaos.

For example, a rock is blocking their path to the food, so they climb it, your intention is to make them gather food faster with less effort, so you remove the rock they are climbing. Now all ants are in chaos, going in all directions, instead of a single line.

balak ubak
Guest

i’d like to ask mr dumdum some questions as part of my own research but i am hesitant. i noticed he doesn’t take kindly to questions as he views them as opposition. i might not be able to control myself if he called me names or insulted me in some other manner.

Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Try it, who knows, maybe he had a change in his constitution.

Amir Al Bahr
Guest

A vote of no confidence is exactly what he needs, methinks :p

Paul Farol (@paulfarol)
Guest
Paul Farol (@paulfarol)

Balak ubak, why don’t you just ask the question and everybody here can answer it.

Dude
Guest

Orion Dumdum is such a turn-off. It’s a real mystery why the people around him do not have the balls to correct his behaviour.

If they can’t even remove Orion and put someone new to be the face of their group, then they can’t prove that it’s easy to change a Prime Minister in a parliamentary system in the Philippines.

balak ubak
Guest

one question that’s been nagging me for some time now is: can a parliamentary system really change our politicians, for the better?

balak ubak
Guest

i wouldn’t mind seeing a shift to parliamentary system, if only to try out something new. i’m just not convinced yet that it is superior as mr dumdum claims. maybe he can come up with a new argument in favor of parliamentary because so far, aside from the textbook descriptions of the system, all i’m hearing from him and his followers are speculative claims.

regardless of that, i’d give parliamentary a chance.

let’s see if mr dumdum can hold his temper and address my concerns like a true gentleman.

Johnny Saint
Guest
balak ubak, “(C)an a parliamentary system really change our politicians, for the better?” The evidence for this has been presented in previous posts related to this ongoing debate. I’ll state it here too. Look to the historical record. Mr Dumdum’s claim is that “merely SHIFTING OVER from the Presidential System to the Parliamentary System will indeed fix things.” The experiences of Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia (which Mr Dumdum often cites), and Taiwan seem to suggest a correlation between economic progress and parliamentary democracy (according to the European model). However, if you were to delve into the political, economic and social conditions… Read more »
libertas
Guest

“A little knowledge is a dangerous thing”
Dum dum has read “a thousand pages” ! – that represent a couple of books -, and has no direct experience!

He is entitled to his opinion, and to be wrong.

Maybe he needs to listen and learn more rather than displaying the failings of a zealot, and a zealot who will fail.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Mr Dumdum is indeed entitled to his opinion. He isn’t entitled to tell everyone else what their opinion should be.

nieves godinez
Guest

He has read a thousand pages of scholarly work on parliamentary politics, now, come on, that is not little knowledge, mind you!

libertas
Guest

‘a thousand pages’ – a days work for a lawyer or oxford undergrad or management consultant.
speed reading an essential tool

Johnny Saint
Guest

Or a research assistant.

libertas
Guest

Always appreciate your comments.
You write well and display logical/balanced thought and a broad knowledge/insights

nieves godinez
Guest
All these doubts about whether a shift in parliamentary system will eventually bring genuine change in our politics can only be proven if we manage to in fact change and then see the results. The presidential/popularity-based politics in the country has failed us big time and that is the reason of our dysfunction. It comes with pork barrel too, a parliamentary system of government will have a prominent bureaucracy as the source of most bills in the legislative, which are informed by extensive research and stock of knowledge in a particular area of policy. A bureaucrat-sponsored policy then is vetted… Read more »
balak ubak
Guest

i agree let’s shift to parliamentary. i want to see how it will work for our country.

but still not buying, the memorized lines about it being superior etc. that’s just opinion not a universal truth.

i hope supporting the shift does not require me to support opinions i disagree with.

======

i just realized. maybe mr dumdum’s followers can’t get rid of him because without him no one else will know what to say to promote parliamentary. in a way, they’re stuck with him.

libertas
Guest

Shifting to a parliamentary system just to ‘see if it works’, is not like taking an aspirin just to see if it gets rid of a headache.

It’s more like trying to stop a headache through leg amputation.
Wrong diagnosis/prognosis, and the result is a man still with a headache but who can no longer play football. lose/lose.

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