Duterte’s promise of change: it is Filipinos’ duty to ensure it is delivered lawfully

duterte_grand_rally

One thing’s for sure, the Philippines’ elite Establishment is unnerved by the show of power that was leading presidential candidate Rodrigo Duterte’s insanely successful miting de avance held Saturday, 7th May 2016 at the Luneta. More than anything else, it was renewed Filipino nationalism on display, with the red-white-and-blue colours dominating above any semblance of partisanism if any at all. If this was Filipino nationalism re-discovered on such a scale not seen since Independence Day in 1946, it says something about the the nature of the fear struck into the hearts of the Philippines’ entrenched oligarchy and the self-appointed members of its so-called “civil society”.

Duterte’s ascent to power highlights the confronting reality that the 1986 EDSA “revolution” was never a true revolution in the real sense of the word. Now that the hot air in the perception that the “holy sacrifice” of the Aquino-Cojuangco clan owned the only “fight” worth fighting by the Filipino had finally been sucked out of the Yellow bubble, it is plain as day today that there really was nothing revolutionary about Cory Aquino’s “democracy”. All it did was oversee a musical chair of oligarchs, all the while keeping the pie being divvied amongst them out of the reach of most ordinary Filipinos.

The Second Aquino Presidency led by Cory’s only son, President Benigno Simeon ‘BS’ Aquino III promised, back in 2010, that all that will change under his watch — that the roadblock to inclusive prosperity would be removed. Under Aquino’s daang matuwid (straight path) mantra, came the promise that the elimination of that singular roadblock to inclusive prosperity, corruption (we were told), would be implemented. Thus, the Son of Cory, put forth yet another myth — that this walking down the “straight path” and the smiting of “corruption” to pave the way for universal prosperity was the revolution his administration would oversee.

That myth has since been busted. It took just six years for Filipinos to discover the abject hollowness of BS Aquino’s Daang Matuwid. With that disillusionment over yet another set of lofty promises being broken came the creeping in of feelings of revulsion towards Aquino’s colours — his yellow banners and the emo rhetoric surrounding them. It is much like how a former lover’s sweet nothings make one’s skin crawl when one recalls the memory of these words being whispered in one’s ear.

The key takeaway from Saturday’s Duterte Grand Rally lies in the words of his former professor Jose David Lapuz who recalled how Duterte learned at San Beda Law School, “Ang batas ay may lakas.” (“the law has strength”) but that nowadays, “ang tingin natin sa batas ay may butas” (“we see the law as full of loopholes”). He then asserts that rather than focusing on finding loopholes in the Law as many politicians do today…

Kay Duterte, hahanapin niya ang lakas ng batas and strongly, forcefully, vigorously, [enforce the law], subalit, siya ang kumakatawan sa pantay-pantay na pagtangkilik ng batas. Mayaman, mahirap, guwapo, hindi guwapo — pantay-pantay na pagtangkilik. Iisa ang Pilipino nation.

[Translated: Duterte will draw upon the full strength of the law and strongly, forcefully, vigorously enforce it and embody its consistent equal applcation to all whether rich, poor, good looking or not so good looking. All will be equal in the application of the law as the Filipino nation is one nation in its eyes.]

Thus the challenge to Filipinos in their choice of Rodrigo Duterte as 16th President of the Republic of the Philippines is to hold him to his former teacher’s words. Duterte has demonstrated that he wields the awesome political capital needed to effect the change his supporters maintain “is coming”. As a leader, he will be judged on the basis of that promise. As his people, Filipinos are duty-bound to ensure he fulfils that promise within the framework of the law that Lapuz asserts will be the source of the strength of the Duterte administration. On the ability to fulfil that duty as citizens of a democracy, all Filipinos will be judged.

This is the pact between leadership and citizenship in a true democracy. How the Philippines upholds its democracy and, at the same time, draws upon the evident strength of Duterte’s leadership and mandate will define the quality of the much-anticipated revolutionary change at hand that was denied the Filipino back in 1986.

The fear being fomented by Duterte’s detractors that his will be an authoritarian vigilante government is a cop-out from the citizen’s duty to her democratic country. Rather than succumb to that fear, Filipinos owe it to themselves to embrace this fear, overcome it, and step up to their duty to the Republic and get the best out of their next president, Rodrigo Duterte.

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Post Author: benign0

benign0 is the Webmaster of GetRealPhilippines.com.

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31 Comments on "Duterte’s promise of change: it is Filipinos’ duty to ensure it is delivered lawfully"

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Frank
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As his people, Filipinos are duty-bound to ensure he fulfils that promise within the framework of the law that Lapuz asserts will be the source of the strength of the Duterte administration. On the ability to fulfil that duty as citizens of a democracy, all Filipinos will be judged. Within the framework also means no drive-by motorcycles for petty crime, something the rich don’t have to worry about. But I think it is important to realize that within the framework doesn’t necessarily mean drive-by motorcycles for the rich either. I agree that it’s ultimately up to the people to hold… Read more »
Aeta
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I just want him (Duterte) and Marcos to put the politicians on a short leash, limit the wealth-grabbing schemes of the Chinese-Filipino businesses, kick the Chinese and Korean nationals out of the country, and take care of the people’s needs. If Duterte and Marcos can do those things, then they would have earned their rights to be the country’s leaders.

marius
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Just the Koreans and the Chinese, Aeta? Or all the foreigners? Or, hey, how about all the people who can’t prove they have native Filipino blood? You could set up special camps for them while they’re being tested. Filipinos don’t need to do this alone, Aeta. Being Chinese or Korean doesn’t determine whether you’re a good or a bad person. I heard the other day about a Korean group who are helping poor Filipino farmers form co-operatives. Should they be kicked out regardless? I guess Filipinos could do it by themselves. If you think North Korea looks like an attractive… Read more »
Aeta
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marius, You have got to be kidding if the Chinese, with the Koreans following in the same footsteps, have not been responsible for the monopoly of our “cottage” industries, from agriculture to manufacturing to retailing–by way of bribing their way into our politicians’ pockets. Do you think Henry Sy became a $14 billion man in the last 30 years without depriving the other economic sectors of the country a big portion of that wealth? Why do you think Chinoy businessmen like Danding Cojuanco and Ramon S. Ang tried to bribe other political candidates, on the tune of about $4 million,… Read more »
marius
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>> The Chinese are the ones now in control of our industries and the Failipnos the ones that work abroad as OFWs to ensure these Chinese-owned businesses stay strong with the patronizations of our people’s remittance monies. And whose fault is that? It’s not Chinese people telling people to spend uncles/brothers/daughter’s hard-earned dollars on garbage instead of investing it wisely. It’s not Koreans coming up with stupid “business” ideas for sari-sari stores or piggeries. These people know how to think big and make it happen. >> I’ve heard that same tune played at least a dozen times a few years… Read more »
Aeta
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Marius, Whose fault is it? I’ll tell you whose fault it is. All of ours. I’m not just going to vilify the stupidity of our arrogant and self-serving people and ignore the greediness and conniving-ness of the Chinese (local and foreign) for contributing to the fucked-up-ness of our country—especially the Chinese-Failipinos whose loyalty–to the Failippines or China–I question to this very day. These motherfuckin’ “Chinoys” don’t give a damn for the Failipino side of their ethnicity, and they just call themselves part-Failipino for practical purposes. Deep down, these Chinese-Failipinos still consider themselves as Chinese and not Failipinos. It’s not that… Read more »
Aeta
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marius, You have got to be kidding if the Chinese, with the Koreans following in the same footsteps, have not been responsible for the monopoly of our “cottage” industries, from agriculture to manufacturing to retailing–by way of bribing their way into our politicians’ pockets. Do you think Henry Sy became a $14 billion man in the last 30 years without depriving the other economic sectors of the country a big portion of that wealth? Why do you think Chinoy businessmen like Danding Cojuanco and Ramon S. Ang tried to bribe other political candidates, on the tune of about $4 million,… Read more »
zaxx
Member
kick the Chinese and Korean nationals out of the country Well PH just bought 2 fighter jets from Korea – Hoorah! Now watch this: ‎China‬’s ‪‎PLA‬ military prowess Du30 is right, what can our 2 jets do vs. China’s 3000? PH is no match against its mighty neighbors – in terms of technology, military, business, discipline – walang sinabe Pinas. If you can’t beat em, join their bloc. Rather than kick out the Chinese and Koreans, let Du30 court them to turn our country into something like them – orderly and disciplined. In geopolitics, you can claim only what you… Read more »
marius
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That was my point exactly, zaxx. Aeta has had some bad experiences and he just can’t let it go. What he calls “the bamboo network” is simply ordinary human beings co-operating towards a common goal. Filipinos can’t do this. The very idea makes them feel uncomfortable. I’ve worked with Chinese people (in China) for years. A lot of them are ill-mannered, selfish, racist, and deceitful. A lot of them, on the other hand, are not. Most of them are very smart and capable. Koreans – in my limited experience – are humorless, more racist, and smarter. For all their faults,… Read more »
Aeta
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Zaxx, If the Philippines just bought two fighter jets from South Korea, then why do we need the United States for? Why don’t we just form a formidable alliance with the South Koreans, go at it with them against China’s military presence in South China Sea and our Muslims brothers in the south, and leave the Americans out of our “teleserye” dramas and chameleon-like loyalty that our people is notoriously known for? It sounds to me you’re trying to create a ‘smorgasbords’ of alliance with nations from the east and west, while fighting for our people’s rights to be freed… Read more »
marius
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Aeta, you really need to sort your head out. You’re living in a fantasy world. I can’t discern any coherent logic in your ranting. Take this for instance: >> I can assure you the rest of our people are not receiving the same benefit that you and marius are reaping from the Chinese and Koreans. Just ask our OFWs. Wake-up call, Aeta: a good fraction of OFWs are working in Korea and China. How do you think those countries are going to react if the Philippines starts kicking out foreigners just because they’re foreigners? Do you think Americans throws a… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Aeta, It would be hypocritical of any of us to say we do not benefit from the Chinese – I just bought an Android smartphone some time ago which was really cheap – guess what “Made in China”. So yeah, I do benefit a lot. I even love to hang out in their huge clean air-conditioned Malls that make me feel like I’m in Singapore in my own land. Whenever I see Chinese, Koreans, Japanese across the country – I’m really glad they come over to my land, which means my land is beautiful enough to make them want to… Read more »
Aeta
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Marius, What’s the matter, getting little antsy because I haven’t replied to you yet? Like I said, our government is “pimping” our people throughout the world so they can send their remittance back to the country to enrich your Chinese and Korean masters, while you and your family are given a taste of what it’s like to live the oligarchs. China and Korea are just another foreign destination to “whore” ourselves to. Money is money and we Failipinos don’t care where it comes from and how we get it—as long as we get it. Whew! Which side of your asshole… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
[Correction] Marius, What’s the matter, getting little antsy because I haven’t replied to you yet? Like I said, our government is “pimping” our people throughout the world so they can send their remittance back to the country to enrich your Chinese and Korean masters, while you and your family are given a taste of what it’s like to live the oligarchs’ lifestyle. China and Korea are just another foreign destination to “whore” ourselves to. Money is money and we Failipinos don’t care where it comes from and how we get it—as long as we get it. Whew! Which side of… Read more »
marius
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Wow. Aeta, I can almost see the spittle landing on your keyboard with that last post. Do you realize how crazed that rant appears? I did read it, but I honestly can’t even figure out what you said. I’m not an OFW, as you seem to think. I have (some) Filipino blood but I wasn’t born here and I’m not a citizen. You’d probably call me a mongrel, or worse. You know, one of those people who should be kicked out for being impure. I came back here, by choice, to work with some distant relatives with a farm –… Read more »
marius
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Aeta: I’m not done. On the subject of rules, you of all people should know that the laws of the land are designed to make people poor and miserable, and/or to funnel cash into favored pockets. Nobody in his right mind would follow The Rules, unless they’re a glutton for punishment. So yes, I’ve no doubt at all that the Koreans and the Chinese do whatever they have to do to evade the rules. If they didn’t, they’d be swiftly out of business, just like all the Americans and Europeans who come here wanting to do things honestly and legally,… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
Zaxx, It would be hypocritical of me not to say this, too. That’s kind of shallow excuse. Getting a cheap smartphone and hanging out in an air-conditioned Chinese-owned malls–just to get the feeling you’re in a Singapore mall–is hardly what I would call a fair and mutual exchange between us and the Chinese, considering what the latter has done to destroy our means of livelihood in the agriculture, manufacturing, retailing, and export/import industries. We Failipinos really are a sucker for nice words, aren’t we? It’s a real boost to our egos when foreigners come to our land to enjoy the… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
Zaxx, It would be hypocritical of me not to say this, too. That’s kind of shallow excuse. Getting a cheap smartphone and hanging out in an air-conditioned Chinese-owned malls–just to get the feeling you’re in a Singapore mall–is hardly what I would call a fair and mutual exchange between us and the Chinese, considering what the latter has done to destroy our means of livelihood in the agriculture, manufacturing, retailing, and export/import industries. We Failipinos really are a sucker for nice words, aren’t we? It’s a real boost to our egos when foreigners come to our land to enjoy the… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Aeta, We cannot become a closed isolationist country like North Korea, or else we will continue to regress. The easy way is to let the Chinese, Koreans, & Japanese into our system so Pinoys don’t need to go abroad as OFWs. We can be OFWs in our own land. Filipinos uniting together? We’ve been trying to do that for 400 years now. What Pinoys need are jobs, and to attract and keep those jobs they need to fix their minds – or else, as marius mentioned investors will keep running away from this country. A strong leader will train Pinoys… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
zaxx, I’ve never suggested we turn into an isolationist nation. What I’m telling you is we need to stop this chameleon-like relationships we have between the United States and China. The Americans–whom we’ve shared a long legacy of mutual alliance with, and whose country where the majority of our Filipino expatriates live, and whom we’ve fashioned our government and way of life from—are obligated to protect us from foreign and domestic enemies, and will always be there for us through thick and thin. The Chinese–aside from the fact they have been a part of our archipelago’s history for centuries as… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Aeta, It should be obvious by now that I’m no ultra-nationalist seeking to someday see native Juan de la Cruz on a pedestal – because I have already come to terms with reality: native Pinoy brains are simply too damaged to be fixed – which is why PH is where Murphy’s law reigns supreme. I’m not favoring the Chinese; I would equally want the Americans and Europeans to come in and dilute this country of its inborn stupidity. My hope is in the next generation of Pinoys – if we expose them to superior first-world minds, there is still a… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
[Correction] zaxx, Exposing the Failipinos to a superior, first-world minds depends on the types of morality and principality those minds are used to abiding by in their own culture. The Chinese’s superiority is done through sheer number and force, compelling billions of its peasant majority to conform to the decisions-making of a pseudo-communist/socialist government that will imprisoned and/or put to death innocent people if they refuse to follow, even if their human rights are violated. Duterte is only one man, just like Marcos was one man, who can intimidate the arrogant and selfish masses to conformity. However, the question we… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Aeta, If you really want to save your country, try this for a change … Roman Road To Salvation A person cannot help save others if he himself isn’t saved? So yes, I agree that change must come from each and every one of us first. —– Regarding native Pinoys vs Chinese. Filipinos like foreigners ruling over them. They go to great lengths to find foreign husbands, go abroad as OFWs, apply for work in Chinese-run businesses, and court foreign direct investments. Since they like it so much, and it’s good for them (dilutes their stupidity), then let them be.… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
zaxx, Please stop recommending these books to your readers to throw them off your scent. Most of the contents in those books are redundant and common sense anyway; and they’re not meant to be quoted literally and applied to all situations—like what you enjoy doing with the verses from the Bible to support your arguments. It’s a no brainer that Fliptards cannot govern themselves. They preferred to be ruled by foreigners because that’s all they’re used to. But it also depends on the foreigners. Fliptards may be stupid when it comes to their lack of care for their country and… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Aeta, Don’t worry, at least I’m getting a better picture of what your agenda here is. So you want me to equally call out China/Chinese/Chinoys for their sins? Well, I do have a few things against the Chinese: 1. SM Malls: almost all concrete; hardly any greenery. No balance. I like the way Americans do urban planning more (e.g. Subic; Camp John Hay). 2. The Spratlys: Pinoys have been completely outwitted. We have practically lost this battle even before it began. Here’s what’s next PAG-ASA Island Invasion. 3. Bribery of politicians. Also some stupid Chinoy politicians exist. Now the problem… Read more »
987Hyden007Toeo99999.99
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987Hyden007Toeo99999.99
The “Yellow Bubble” of the Aquino/Cojuangco political family, will burst this coming, May 9, 2016. EDSA was not a revolution. It was a coup d’ etat by the U.S./C.I.A., with the aid of the Feudal Oligarchs of every color. Paving the way to the Feudal Oligarchy government…We are never a Democracy. Cory Aquino’s constitution favors much the Feudal Oligarchs…this is the reason the gap between the rich and the poor , in our country is too wide. Whoever will win this coming, May 9, 2016 election; will have a very hard time to deal and solve the problems of our… Read more »
zaxx
Member
Marami na tayong batas. Naaubusan na nga siguro ng gagawin ang ating mga Senators at Congressmen kung kaya’t tila mga senseless propositions tulad ng “renaming NLEX to Cory Aquino Highway” nalang ang makuha nilang maisip. What we need is a strong enforcer of our laws today. If we had a strong enforcer, would there be anymore need for the Senate to set up their kangaroo court to investigate each other for corruption allegations (just to get limelight on front-page news)? Getting man-of-the-people Du30 to sit on Malacanang’s throne will not be the culmination of our struggle. This time it will… Read more »
Gilby
Guest

I’m looking forward to a Federal Filipinas.

Aeta
Guest

Gilby,

Federal Filipinas or Martial Law or anything that will root out the deeply-entrenched Chinese businesses and political dynasties out of their fortresses.

Aeta

d_forsaken
Guest

You have to direct change; if you don’t do so, change will direct you. Guess… the direction change will offer you is not a comfortable one. But the direction you can offer change will be the most comfortable. Go, make a change now!

Aeta
Guest

d_forsaken,

And that “change” that you’re talking about that I’ve started and all of you guys on GRP need to continue, is to keep creating the awareness that the Yellow Party is made up of the Aquinos, Cojuangcos, their Chinese connections (local and foreign) and their well-bribed political minions.

Aeta

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