Women are being STEM-shamed into coding work by Silicon Valley!

You know why Silicon Valley and the whole tech industry is pushing women and minorities into taking up coding and into various techno-geeky fields of study? It’s because they want the other 50 percent of the workforce to join the pool of programming professionals and put downward pressure on tech salaries.

So when you come across idiotic articles like this one asserting that Tech Would Be Better If More Women Designed It, think again and wonder what the underlying agenda is. According to that piece;

Women make up just a quarter of the STEM workforce but closing the gap would not only help tackle the skills shortage in the tech industries, it would also lead to better performance, said Emma McGuigan, managing director of Accenture’s technology division in the U.K. and Ireland.

“We all know that you get the best team performance when you have diverse teams and people from different genders and backgrounds. That is when you get the best ideas,” she said.

womem_who_code_01

That figures of course, considering this is a claim tech giant Accenture is making. Accenture, after all, is a company that’s spreading its tentacles into every corner, nook, and cranny of the globe in search of cheap labor to churn out code, so it can bill its blue-chip clients hundreds of dollars per hour of “development time”.

So now it’s all about getting women into STEM fields (“STEM” is a now-popular acronym standing for Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics). That’s sort of the 21st Century equivalent of fat-shaming. Back in the old days, lots of women suffered self-esteem issues thanks to an entire marketing industry idealising a concept of beauty that favours tall thin and fair-skinned women. Today, it is Silicon Valley spreading notions that women who do not get into STEM are uncool.

See, the thing with political-correctness is that it is not immune to this thing called unintended consequences. The science and tech field, in particular, is rife with textbook cases of this phenomenon. Every invention has unintended consequences. Cars once heralded as wonder inventions are now the scourge of urban living. Antibiotics have led to the proliferation of “super-bugs” that now threaten to wipe big mammals off the face of the planet. Nuclear weapons beat a resolute enemy quickly back in World War II but now find themselves in the hands of an even more crazed bogey.

Those hipsters who now STEM-shame women into turning away from the humanities and liberal arts so that they can, we are told, go head-to-head with men in Silicon Valley have blinded themselves to the known and unknown-unknown unintended consequences of this initiative mounted under the banner of political-correctness.

All these guys really want is a vast pool of code monkeys they can pay with bananas. Politically-correct that.

In an age when people worry about the loss of our humanity thanks to the onslaught of artificial intelligence, social media and device addiction, and robotics, the last thing we need is an army of people — whether they be men or women — who got into coding just because some billionaire who comes to the office in jeans and sneakers everyday says it’s a “cool” thing.

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Post Author: benign0

benign0 is the Webmaster of GetRealPhilippines.com.

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9 Comments on "Women are being STEM-shamed into coding work by Silicon Valley!"

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William Jackson
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Question, how do you plan to fill the STEM high paying shortage of jobs in the USA and many other countries? Unlike the Philippines, the USA has no discrimination in pay for the same job. STEM jobs from STEM teachers to bio mechanical engineers are the highest paying and shortage jobs in the USA. Also most of the jobs, provide fast tracks through the immigration process for VISA. What is the true fear? Is it that people will finally wake up and see that STEM involves technology that makes our lives better from the software coding used to make bullet… Read more »
Stefan
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I don’t see any political correctness issue. It would be politically correct to demand to raise the salaries in the arts and humanities field. So it does not fit into your crusade against “political correctness”. What will happen if women leave arts and humanities in favor of STEM? Well, the STEM salaries will drop. That’s not politically correct. The salaries in arty and humanities will raise. So these are becoming more attractive for men. At the end you may have an equal distribution of men and women into STEM, arts and humanities and equal salaries. That’s what the PC advocates… Read more »
T
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dude, this is not a bad thing. the world needs a new marie curie more than it needs a next jk rowling. the point being, if women are not given this opportunity they’d most probably end up as just another wasted talent. If you can name at least 10 famous women scientists from the top of your hat (besides curie and ada lovelace) without consulting either google or wiki, i’ll concede my argument. I graduated from a government-funded high school that requires all its students to take up science-related fields, and every time i hear about a schoolmate who instead… Read more »
755Hyden007Toro099.99
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755Hyden007Toro099.99
There are people, in the U.S. workplaces, who simply do not like women and minorities. There is the so called: “glass ceiling”, whereby women and minorities cannot go up in the management level or higher positions. However, things are slowly changing, as the world is slowly changing. Women and minorities are getting more and more higher education. And, these companies, cannot hold on to the notion, that some people are not fitted to such work and positions, because of their gender , ethnic background and the color of their skin. The workplace is getting diverse every day. People’s brains and… Read more »
OnesimusUnbound
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The tech industry is inherently sexist.

Unless this is resolved, women in general will be uncomnfortable working in such industry.

d_forsaken
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If you have a vision and you are able to pronounce that vision clearly and consistently you have a fighting chance.