Filipino Foreign Policies And How They’re Killing Us As A People

Foreigners, at least in the eyes of many Filipinos, seem to have an air of mystery in inscrutability to them. In fact, in some instances, there are even those who ascribe a sense of mysticism to them and see them as either benevolent gods with unlimited wealth or cunning devils with ulterior motives. With the current case OFW Jane Veloso is facing and the constant problem with sex tourism and those who allegedly become victims of it, I’m not really surprised that a lot of people tend to demonize foreigners and see them in a negative light.

Unfortunately, what a lot of these self-styled “patriots” overlook is that it is our own political policies that enable the deplorable conditions that our country now suffers from. Every country has a sense of nationalism but I am often forced to question whether or not what Filipinos have can be called “nationalism” or something else entirely. Again and again, I find it funny that many typical Pinoys tend to disdain foreigners even though our economy is largely dependent on foreign aid and that our military requires a lot of help from the American armed forces to be an effective fighting force and defend its own territories from threats both outside and inside the country.

poverty_philippines_30

So okay, here’s my take on our problems with foreigners and how our problems lie less with them but with our own approach to the matter:

On The OFW Problem

While we might have succeeded in preventing Jane Veloso’s execution, it is, at best, a delaying tactic and that there are probably thousands of other OFW’s out there who might find themselves in a similar or even worse predicament. Then, there’s the fact that the Bureau of Customs seems to be intent on opening balikbayan boxes and making off with their contents or taxing OFW’s unfairly.

However, if one were to look more closely at the situation, we wouldn’t have these kinds of problems if we just made our own oligarch-centered constitution more open to foreign trade. Without the debilitating 60%-40% restriction on foreign companies, the potential for international trade increases exponentially, allowing for more profit all around. After all, why force our people to seek out opportunities elsewhere when we can bring said opportunities within our own shores.

Sex Tourism

Look, before I go on, I have to ask just what is it that pushes many of our women to become prostitutes?

That’s right. It’s poverty. Unfortunately, again, as it is with our OFW’s, the root cause of all of this is our economic policies. Without promising career opportunities in their own country, what do we expect majority of our women to turn to in times of hardship?

If our economic policies allowed for more jobs that promised good and profitable careers to our women, do you think they would resort to prostitution? If we had more to offer, not only would less women to turn to prostitution, we would have more workers to boost our workforce. If there were more promising job opportunities in the Philippines, there would be less cases similar to that of “Nicole” and Laude.

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Post Author: Grimwald

I came that you may know PAIN and have it in abundance…

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86 Comments on "Filipino Foreign Policies And How They’re Killing Us As A People"

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zaxx
Member

Making our “oligarch-centered constitution more open to foreign trade. Without the debilitating 60%-40% restriction on foreign companies,”

Looks like a call for cha cha. Again here’s the RESET button —-> [DU30]

Press at your own risk. Sorry for the disclaimer. I don’t really know the guy that much; but it seems he matches the job description.

Go RICO
Guest

Hi, zaxx. I agree “Press at your own risk”. If Cha Cha switches to 40% 60%, the investors will come, BUT they’ll suck the country dry.

As a Foreigner, I think it’s best for Phil the way things are. I just need to be VERY Selective in choosing local partners.

I needed skills and commitment not connections and leverage, so I partnered with bright, young idealistic University Students.

It drove SEC and DTI CRAZY!!

zaxx
Member
Go Rico. This is a county of failed experiments. I won’t be surprised if DU30, chacha, or any other combination of “chemicals” will be another dud. Hope you’re not infected yet with the dysfunctional pinoy mindset of your partners. I suggest you demand they first recite the Zaxxun Creed before signing them up for mission critical roles. Reprogramming minds is my hypothesis as the only real, lasting and effective solution to the Pinoy FUBR culture/system. After 30 years, let’s see if my hypothesis graduates to theory status. Anyway I commend you for placing your bet on Pinoys – that takes… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest

Hi, zaxx, thanks for the reply.

Nope, so far I’ve not contracted any additional infections or developed any mental malfunctions other the ones I came with.

I learned two really valuable things from DARPA 1) how to “Screen the Team” and 2) NO FEAR of FAILURE. If one phase fails to achieve, we just move resources to another phase and keep moving.

I have no illusions about Cha Cha and all the exotic formulae. They are FUBAR and not worth the time to discuss. We just stick to our plan, maintain situational awareness and adjust accordingly. CHEERS.

Go RICO
Guest

zaxx, I forgot to add, Philippines is my MOST EXCITING ADVENTURE. I’ve been in lots of “Areas in Transition (Sudan, Gaza, Somalia, Pakistan) and i believe Philippines will be recorded in history as “Evolution not Revolution”

We’re looking for the perfect “Pivot Point”, then changes will come very quickly. Ciao

zaxx
Member

Go Rico, that’s great to hear you find it’s actually more fun in the Phil. I sure hope it lasts. If you found an incorruptible & competent Pinoy to partner with, you have a very rare Jewel.

honest and filipino are 2 words that don’t usually go together. But I do hope this Pinoy race evolves quicker than the Chinese creeping invasion; otherwise they’ll be left with nothing. The influx of foreign minds like you will help a lot. It’s good you still see a bright spot in this country.

Go RICO
Guest
Thanks for reply zaxx. I like hearing from you. Agreed, honesty and integrity are rare here, but I sense those qualities are just below the surface in Filipinos, waiting to be revealed. Israelis refer to themselves as SABRA, which is a native cactus, tough and thorny on the outside but soft, sweet and full of life just beneath. Just like Filipinos. Re: Local Partner, we’ve been together for years, and my International Partners (DC, NASA, Malaysia, China/Australia) respect her and trust her judgement. She’s very street wise and clever. Her main job is to keep me out of trouble. Cheating… Read more »
zaxx
Member

Go Rico
Please see signs of low EQ:
http://core.eqi.org/signs.htm

That list pretty much describes 90% of people in this country
Please don’t be too trusting when dealing with Pinoys.

There have been too many stories of a “trust worthy” Pinoy serving for decades turning out to be a double crossing crook.

But keep that optimism up; just be careful. Cheers

Go RICO
Guest

Hey, zaxx, thanks for the study. I use lots of them and find some merit in all of them.

No ship is UNSINKABLE (Titanic) but my 5 Partners and I are the RD&D hold all the Patents and know-how. We compartmentalize all funding and revenue streams to prevent leaking or cross contamination.

We isolate and insulate markets from each other, so loss or anomaly in one area doesn’t sink us.

You are correct, 90% of Filipinos are in the Low EQ Range, but that’s why I’m here. We need to heal that wound. CHEERS

d_forsaken
Guest

Most Failipinos are close to total ignorance about the world. They are ignorant. That is an unhealthy condition in a country in which foreign policy has to be endorsed by the people if it is to be pursued.

And it makes it much more difficult for any president to pursue an intelligent policy that does justice to the complexity of the world.

Presidente Emilio
Guest

We can blame out fucked up education system for that.

Andreas Huettner
Guest

Had your president and his vassals not as corrupt criminals, you could enjoy a better education.

Cezar
Guest
Enlightened me on this 60% -40% policy, meaning 60% Filipino owned and 40% foreign owned as partnership????? Is this a correct assumption of the Philippine Law?????that the author said hinders the creations of business investments thus hiders more jobs creation….this is what you meant isn’t it?????? I can agree with this but only partially because this is not the major problem that prevent business investors to come to the Philippines..why are they afraid to invest and put their factories in the Philippines,,, why did they put it in other south East Asian countries more than in the Philippines…our politicians should… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Dear Grimwald, this comment is not aimed to attack you. I just want to clear up some things. Is prostitution really causing a problem in the Philippines? How many prostitutes are there in the Philippines? And how many women/girls have a non-related prostitution job? Pls see it in perspective. We are not able to save the entire world (if you know what I mean??!!) In my country we also have prostitutes (including escort services/agencies. This is the high end prostitute and very expensive. Maybe you have seen and watched the 1990 Hollywood movie “Pretty Woman” with Richard Gere & Julia… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Maybe somebody can answer thi simple question.

What if I am married with a Filipina and we both are living in the Philippines. I build a house from scratch and pay for everything out of my own pockets. Then after x-years, the marriage goes haywire. Do I lose on the house bec of that 60-40 law?
If yes, then I will never buy a house in the Philippines. I pay 100% but at the end of the day I lose.
If the same applies for business objects then I will never start a business/office/shop/store in the Philippines.

jericsaniel
Guest
@robert. Yes. You can build a house but can never own it; as foreigners are not allowed to own a piece of land in the Philippines but you can own a condo unit. Goes the same with companies. 60/40 rule is really a turn-off for foreign companies to invest in the Philippines not to mention the corruption, and our complicated taxation. While other countries, like Singapore, makes it so easy for everybody to open a business. That is why more jobs are created. This also creates a pull on our talents to leave our country and work for our neighbors.… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Jericsaniel,
To actually build a house is not expensive (just bricks) but owning the actual soil (where the house is built on plus the front and back yard) is far more important. The soil/ground makes it expensive. And the actual foundation (of the house) starts with the soil.

I see big and great similarities with building a house and the lack of having a good foundation in the Philippine society.

andrew
Guest

60-40 ownership is for foreign businessmen who wants to put up their businesses in the country. if you have a business and you want to put it up here, then 60% of your profit goes to the government then you get the 40%. that’s how i understand it.

Robert Haighton
Member

Andrew,
without sounding arrogant, it isnt that difficult to manipulate one’s taxable income. In real having an income or profit of PHP 10,000 can be easily reduced to an income or profit of PHP 1,000. So, I see no problem with the 60-40 scheme.

Where I draw the line is when buying an actual office (building or floor) and never becoming the legal owner for 100%.

marius
Guest

Andrew: foreigners are only allowed to own condos because foreigners are not allowed to own land, at all, ever.

Therefore, if you bought a house (in your wife’s name) you would lose everything in the case of divorce: it doesn’t matter how much, financially, you’ve invested into it. I’ve heard many stories of this happening – sometimes with deliberate intent on the part of the woman – and the judges will be pissing themselves with glee that they’re depriving some dirty foreigner of his lawful property. The word “theft” simply has a completely different meaning in the Philippines.

marius
Guest

Just to clarify: I mean “in the case of separation”, because as we all know nobody gets divorced in that happy paradise.

Add
Guest
@Robert. I don’t think the 60-40 applies to conjugal properties, which are immediately 50:50 husband/wife joint properties irrespective of who paid for it, unless there are pre-nuptial agreements. Joint means one party can’t dispose of the property without the agreement of the other. If you want to be shrewd about it, the party who paid for the property could ask the other to give him an undated Power of Attorney which he could use at some point in time when he wants to sell the property even without the knowledge of the other — it is some kind of a… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Add,
thanks. Appreciated the explanation. Very usefull indeed.

So theoretically, my Filippina wife (if I was married with one) can become president of the Philippines BUT in reality I am pulling the strings?

Add
Guest
Hahaha, Robert. All the time. In the PHL, you marry the family, you could find yourself in a business partner with the family, and you elect a guy into office and thus are also electing in a way the family into office. All that is okay, except that the mothers in law here for some reason are typically known to be more nagging and demanding than your wife herself, and that is what will make married life miserable. Hahaha. That also gave credence to the persistent rumor during the incumbency of Gloria Arroyo that it was actually her husband, Mike… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Add, when my pinay GF (now ex) and I talked about a possible wedding she wanted to settle/reside in the same place as where her parents live. I said, no way. (Why I aid that?). Well, constantly people started barging in to meet the “trophy” (me) every time she and I were at her parents place. And like in my own situation, my family members (my 2 sisters) live 100+ kilometres away from me. Like I mentioned many times here, we give much more preference to our privacy than our family members. Plus we dont like people barging in. Pls… Read more »
Add
Guest
There is one thing I will tell you that nobody in the Philippines will ever admit. I have observed up close the Indian society with their caste system and all that because of my many trips there. You know what? Among the ASEAN nations, it still amazes me that the one that comes closest to India is the Philippines. There is definitely a class structure here that is discernible. For one, the women in the upper class have a totally different mentality than those in the lower. I should clarify that. When I say upper class, I am talking of… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Add, I understand why you compare India with the Philippines (or vice versa). The nouveau riche are almost always assholes. I wouldnt know how to describe my in-laws (well actually ex-inlaws). Some people told me they are middle class. I dont know what PH middle class looks like and what their mindset is. For me my inlaws are typically Filipino. Old-fashioned, conservative and having the mindset that equals the Dutch but then from 60 years ago. I never – I repeat never – met a PH person who had a very forward/modern mindset. For me the Philippines doesnt feel like… Read more »
andrew
Guest

hey add, regarding about the indian caste system, your observation is correct. we are actually indianized and not all are aware of it. this is the time of trade and commerce in pre Spanish Era. part of trading is culture/governance system.

Additionally, I also had this theory that po/opo is used by slaves at that time. hence, I don’t see that po/opo is respect. it’s a sign of submission for us tagalogs.

Add
Guest

Interesting, Andrew.

Aeta
Guest

@Andrew. It (po/opo) is also a sign of tactic for us Filipinos to get what we want, because there is no sincerity behind those words.

Bananaboy
Guest

You lose your house and you can’t even divorce the woman. But if you buy a house on her name then you deserve it anyway for being stupid.

Robert Haighton
Member

Bananaboy,
a marriage closed in the Philippines, first needs to be registered in my country. If I dont register my PH marriage/wedding then I am still regarded as single (by dutch law).

I think I will never invest money in the Philippines except my daily needs and other neccessities.

37Toro007Hayden9.999
Guest

Prostitution is the “oldest profession”. There are many reasons, why prostition is a profitable profession. Or why people become prostitutes.

In our country; the alledge reason is “poverty”. However, people can work and earn respectable money, if they try to work. But, it is easier to earn money by prostitution. They do not care about : HIV AIDS, VD, WARTS, “Tulo”,”Kuto”, STD, etc…

Prostitution is not only confined to women; but men and young boys, also…”Pilpinas Kay Ganda”…”Kay Ganda ang mga Puta”…

Cezar
Guest

To Roberts,,,,Here is America acquired property during marriage, is called conjugal property it does not matter who financed it,,,unless both has written agreement not to…when divorced they are 50- 50 division of property..by California law..In the Philippines it is the same 60-40 means just like that…60% to the Filipino citizen and 40% to non Filipino citizen…the same as in business partners.

Robert Haighton
Member
Cezar, in my country, it depends what marriage regime a couple signs. We have 2. Either a couple marries – in gemeenschap van goederen This means that everything will be settled 50-50% in case of a divorce OR – op huwelijkse voorwaarden (prenuptial agreement) This means that everything will be settled by the “rule”: what is yours, is yours and what is mine, is mine. So in the latter case, I paid for the house then the house will be mine (no matter what). This regime is clearly to protect the rich(er) person so that in case we are dealing… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Cezar,
dont you think its a bit unfair – the 60-40 rule?
As foreigner I buy and pay the house (including the land/soil); I probably also pay (in full) for the new furniture. Plus maybe property taxes. And after x-years all I get is 40%. Where is the fairness of that rule? The Filipina can sell the house, get 60% and maybe she (and her direct family) never need to work again. Wow.

Cezar
Guest
To Roberts, I understand what you mean but that is the law of the country ,,In America this used be an issue, that was resolved by immigration,,, the marriage must last 5 years before it was considered legally married….then it’s 50-50 split , if it falls apart before that then alternative in court is you request annullment …legally more expensive and lengthy to solve..if the law of the country does not seems favorable to one..then they should not marry in the first place…there should be no problem if there were no financial intent on both parties……but for job creation which… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member
Cezar, we have no annulment or nullify nor legal seperation. All you can get here is a legal divorce. Or you can just pack your bags and leave your spouse. This is called seperation but technically you are still married. You just live somewhere else. Who wants to live under the same roof with the spouse you dislike/hate? No one. Or will you sleep in the same bed with the persobn/spouse you start to dislike/hate? Again, no way. You can file for a divorce after having been married for 1 year. Even when you live apart. And you only need… Read more »
Bananaboy
Guest

Cesar, that is not correct, because you can’t buy a land and own 40% of it. You can not own any land as a foreigner. Unless you form a corporation, which owns the land. Then you are correct with the 40%.

Go RICO
Guest

@ Bananaboy, that’s a good idea. Foreigners shouldn’t marry, just form a Corp with a Filipina.

If things go bad in the relationship you can still retain 40% of the asset. Correct?

marius
Guest

No. The property is then owned by the corporation, not by the two directors, and if the company falls outside the 60/40 mark – in this case by the foreigner buying-out the Filipina – the company will be dissolved by the SEC. The foreigner loses all of his investment and it is handed over to the Filipino partner(s).

This is so common that (IIRC) there was a Supreme Court ruling on the matter. It goes without saying they upheld the legal validity of this practice – and realistically, as the law is now written, they could not have done otherwise.

Go RICO
Guest

Thanks, Marius, that clears things up.

So, bottom line, any Foreign Investment in Phil is ultimately a Donation.

Andreas Huettner
Guest
Simple things are in the Philippines is not possible without bribes. For me unthinkable that I pay any bribes lackey. Too often I’ve heard – I am “PNOY”. Dumb and ridiculous this statement appears. Especially if they are made by persons who are not able to scribble their names without template freehand on a piece of paper. Or is it the pride, despite the poverty and the catastrophic conditions to survive? A very sad situation. The Philippine economy is a disaster. I have been following the regular reports Aquino, which tell of economic recovery and prosperity. Of course, he’s right.… Read more »
Cezar
Guest
Do you think DUTERTEis the right choice to turn the country around…..if you think he is why he doesn’t want to do it,,,,maybe he is not patriotic enough or maybe like the other intellectual Filipino that I observed ..they don’t want do it because it is hard………a handful of patriotic could not muster a great motivation to turn the country around ..they feel it’s too hard for them….it doesn’t give them motivation of the ten million population that don’t do nothing to change itself..back to where we started …WHAT IS IN IT FOR ME !!MENTALITY. DUTERTE say he is tough… Read more »
Robert Haighton
Member

Cezar,
I am sure your question is not meant for me. But I will answer how I think about it.

Only the people (the Juan’s and Maria’s) can change the country. The politicians will NEVER change it. It is not in the benefit of the politicians to change the country for the better.
But the actual culture of the Philippines will hinder Juan and Maria to be successfull in changing the country (“dont bite the hand that feeds you”, is something I hear very often to NOT change things)

Robert Haighton
Member

Cezar,
In short, if you are a woman and marry with a Dutch guy and you stay a full time house wife, I am sure the Dutch guy will marry on the basis of a prenuptial agreement and not “in community of property” (conjugal property). As house wife, you are contributing nothing even if the husband gets richer/wealthier. It is to his credit.

And pls dont give me the answer: “buy hey, I cleaned the house, I raised the kids, I cooked dinner”.

Then I will answer you: “okay we take a full time nanny”.

Cezar
Guest

That is a smart choice for you, but for others who really marry for love,,,,they gamble .. Example …Nicole Smith who married the Texan oil billionaire…..He married her for love…I guess he is really Inlove with her..

Robert Haighton
Member

Cezar,
come on, that guy fell in love with an image, with a body, 40 years younger. Unhealthy relationship. And she was a typical “gold digger”.

Exactly in such cases, the rich(er) person needs to be protected.

Bystander
Guest

Yes 60/40 is in the constitution, but PHL being a corrupt government this constitutional provision has been circumvented by creative system manipulations. Pls read attached column in Manila Times by former Ambassador Robert Tiglao.

http://www.manilatimes.net/were-the-only-asian-country-where-foreigners-control-the-telecom-industry/216706/

Cezar
Guest

manipulation or not ,,,they put Filipinos to work..they creat jobs,,,,they,re employees feed their family ..that is what’s important…because without them,,,,poverty probably doubles and it is going to that direction…next step when people are hungry they will ….pop. you in the head and steal your money or food so they will survive… It is happening in most areas..and worse…anarchy is closing in….civil unrest ang God help the Philippines …civil war is next….

Bystander
Guest

Then, let’s do away with the damn Constitution and its governing laws. Or better yet, get rid rid of the official government set-up. To each his own…Wild, Wild, West! After all, what do we have now, a Gatasang Pambansa, composed of scientists–RACKET scientist, that is.

marius
Guest

>> To each his own…Wild, Wild, West!

How is that different to the Philippines today? 🙂

Aeta
Guest

@Bystander,

It’s not just the government that is corrupt–remember, the government is made up of people just like us: Filipinos–the whole culture is corrupt because our value system is dysfunctional.

Aeta
Guest

@marius.

This is what the Philippine has always been: a “Wild, Wild, West!” The Filipino people have always had the attitude of “it’s every man for himself,” without any deep-seated concern for the country and each other. The Philippines would not be what it is today–fleeced (raped) by local and interest groups, and the general population–if it were not for the self-serving (kanya-kanya) and arrogant/aristocratic (hambog) attitude of its people.

Aeta

Go RICO
Guest
Thanks, Grimwald. I noticed you reference Movie plots and storylines as background. I’m not in your league, but I tried using “Dangerous Minds” to illustrate the Foreigner experience in Philippines. For me, IT WORKED!! Thanks!! In the True Story “School System” (Gov) neglected aspirations and potential of Students (Filipinos), the Students devolved into a cynical subclass (Squatter Mentality) then an Anglo (Foreigner) teacher enters the picture. Preconceived Suspicion and Mistrust ruled. To break the impasse, Foreigner preemptively awards “A Grades” as a gesture of good faith, but the students had to work hard to maintain and defend the Grade. The… Read more »
Bananaboy
Guest
I beg to differ that Filipino women go into prostitution because of poverty. Yes of course, there is a percentage, but it is by far not the only reason. The reason is the lack of education and that they are plainly lazy. Yes, lazy! It’s easy to make money. In this country it’s almost fashionable to be a whore. It’s portrayed on TV and in the movies. Half of the actresses (if you can call them that, entertainers is a more fitting description) are whores. Come on now? Aside from the ridiculous fact that Filipino woman are just about the… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

Prostitution = Easy Money.

Go RICO
Guest

WOW, Bananaboy, you certainly know a lot about Prostitutes!!!

You can quote prices from Ermita, Burgos and EU, in both Pesos AND Euros and yoU’ve interviewed them to find if they enjoy the work.

Are you in the business?

Bananaboy
Guest

I can’t help it if you don’t know anything, so don’t be a smartass. Your sarcastic statement is a reflection of your lack of worldliness.

Jim DiGriz
Guest

Hey Rico, have you ever talked to a sales lady at SM? Are you in the shopping mall business?

Even I know how much a hooker charges in Europe. They even have ads in newspapers and brothels advertise on the radio. So yeah….don’t be a smartass.

Go RICO
Guest

@ Jim DiGriz, The topic was Poverty causing Filipinos to risk their lives working as OFWs or girls resorting to Prostitution to feed their families.

I was surprised me that “Bananaboy” (“Senoritas Boy”)rants about lazy prostitutes charging too much for their service when minimum wage is only P485 day.

Either his economic development plan is everyone becomes a success as prostitutes making P 3,000 per shot or prostitutes should reduce their price so he can afford one on his minimum wage.

How’s that for “Smartass”? Pretty good, huh??

Jim DiGriz
Guest

I think Bananaboy knows a lot about the business because he talked to your sister.
Pretty good, huh?

Go RICO
Guest
@ Jim DiGriz, yeah, that’s possible. My sister sounds just like Bananaboy’s type. She has been addicted to Heroine since she was 17 years old, Sister had 2 daughters by 2 different men who were each already married fathers, neither of which married my sister or supported the daughters. My sister is a “Super Christian” and claims to have long talks with GOD (seems unlikely to me). My 2 nieces got good grades in school but ran away from home at young ages to escape my sisters drug habit and poor housekeeping. One is a happily married lesbian and the… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

The remittance money has done nothing but increase the inflation rate in the country and fatten the bank accounts of corrupt government officials and Chinese-owned businesses, while keeping the OFWs–and their respective families–in a “serfdom” status, by continuing to buy into these monopolizing organizations’ products and services. Sex tourism has done nothing but tarnish our already tarnished image as an impoverished and corrupt nation.

Go RICO
Guest

@Aeta, You are EXACTLY RIGHT. Poverty is the Primary Product of the Philippines. It ensures that people remain desperate enough to risk their lives as OFWs.

This sad excuse for a Government knows exactly how much is remitted and which families benefit.

When remittance goes up, then the price of electricity, water, food and education go up (inflation) Only the Dynasties benefit from OFW efforts, and OFW families continue to suffer in silence.

Aeta
Guest
@Go RICO, It is time the Filipino people realize the kind of monopolizing grip the government and Chinese-owned-owned businesses (the Koreans are also gradually joining the monopoly trend) have around their necks. Each time we spend our money at SM and Robinson malls; each time we buy a condominium, a house and lot, or automobiles; each time we put our money in Chinese-owned banks, each time we patronize hotels, resorts, restaurants, and other forms of entertainments, we are being drawn closer into a trap that is going to drive us deeper into poverty or out of the country as OFWs… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest
@ Aeta, you’re correct again on all points. Filipinos we meet in the West (US and EU) are very intelligent, hard working and highly respected professionals. So, it surprises foreigners when the come to Phil and see that Filipinos are abused, impoverished and enslaved by their own Government. Even the least educated understand what’s happened to them and the causes, but they lack the will to change. They are exhausted, no energy to resist. Philippine-Chinese community succeeds here because they’re quietly unified. They don’t march or blog, they take care of each other. My hope is that one day soon… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

@Go RICO,

“My hope is that one day soon Filipinos will realize that they ARE THE BOSS, that Government belongs to them, and fire all of the Old Dynasty Politicians and Refuse to Elect any more of these clowns.”

This will only happen if the Filipino people are willing to set aside their personal interests–and differences–and learn to work together to revamp the dysfunctional values of its corrupt culture. Otherwise, the whole country is doomed.

Remember: ‘The Philippines is corrupt because the people are corrupt; the people are corrupt because the culture is corrupt.’

Aeta

Go RICO
Guest

Hi, Aeta, yes, but corruption begins at the top. Leaders are corrupt and they leaving us to struggle among ourselves for what is left.

If Police, teachers, public workers and farmers ALL made good wages to support their families, there would be less need to bribe or corrupt.

Even Aquino said, “If there is no corruption, there will be no poverty”.

Since there is still to much Poverty and too small minimum wage, I suppose Aquino is a success in his corruption.

Aeta
Guest
Go RICO, Perhaps these compilation of replies I gave to another commenters will help explain the futulity of directly blaming the Filipino politicians, and the problems and solutions starts at the grassroot level of our country. ‘I stopped blaming the Philippine government officials a long time ago for pilfering the country’s resources, because they are just products of corrupt culture. So each time a government official does something wrong to the country, and its people, instead of blaming him or her, I find the nearest mirror and blame myself, because I, too, am a product of the same corrupt culture.… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest
Aeta, thank you for your reply, and for your sincerity in accepting responsibility. That’s a rare quality. “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing” Edmund Burke Our leaders will only be as honest as we demand and deserve. If we elect corrupt leaders, we are guilty of being stupid. If we elect honest leaders who become corrupt, we are guilty of being foolish. If we elect leaders only because their family is rich and famous, we are guilty of being lazy. It is up to us, all 50 Million of us,… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

Go RICO,

You’re most welcome, and I wholeheartely agree with all your quotes. I’ve enjoyed exchanging ideas with you. Let’s all hope for the best for the Philippines and its people; but, most importantly, let’s not wait around for it to happen someday; it might not. Let’s ALL Make It Happen Now.

Take Care,

Aeta

Go RICO
Guest

Aeta, we agree. It is NEVER TOO LATE, but there is NO TIME to WASTE!!!

Philippines is ready for her CHAMPION!!

Go RICO
Guest

Hi, Aeta,

>> Let’s all hope for the best for the Philippines and its people; but, most importantly, let’s not wait around for it to happen someday; it might not. Let’s ALL Make It Happen Now.<<

Would you like to begin NOW?? I have a plan.

CHEERS,

Go RICO

LVM Malana
Guest
If business is foreign owned, land must be leased at least and will benefit local citizenry. Why? Because every country belong to its people. Unless foreigner is also Filipino citizen or expat. Also, there are many rich foreigners while many poor and inexperienced Filipinos. Many foreigners capable of owning bigger Philippine land and these lands may be stolen from clueless landowners (by government or oligarchs like the ancestral lands of natives or indigenous people, can be done by trickery or by force), meaning more Filipino losing ownership and ending up renting or squatters and will depend on government or foreigners… Read more »
Aeta
Guest

@LVM Malana.

“Money [and Power] Talks and Bullshit Walks.” No place on earth that saying is more true than the Philippines, where the unthinkable can be thinkable, the illegal can be legal, the immoral can be moral, with the right amount of money and power.

Aeta

LVM Malana
Guest

Which explains why disastrous calamities always happen here. Not by nature alone but by man’s doing. Only the fittest and the wise really survived. May that serve as a warning.

Aeta
Guest

We Filipinos–with our self-serving (kanya-kanya/makasarili) and aristocratic (hambog) attitude about how we see ourselves–are our own downfalls. It doesn’t matter how religious, educated, and socially sophisticated we’ve become over the last century, we are still afflicted by the feudal (crab) mindset of our tribal ancestors when it comes to how we treat one another.

LVM Malana
Guest
Yes. Like the other commenters said, Philippines as “Wild, Wild, West”, every man for himself. That’s why it’ll help a lot if we have citizens or leaders (especially the Presidential candidates) who are vocal about his vision and plans of making this country a great nation. Without those, it’s hard to stir the crowd, inspire and get participation from people who are flooded with daily stresses or problems (rich or poor, we have flood and daily traffic, minimum income and high cost of living, unemployment and corruption so nobody really is free from those things). Bright ideas should be made… Read more »
Aeta
Guest
@LVN Malana. The first thing we need to do is stop putting so much emphasis on what I call ‘Pinoy Pride Chicken,’ which most Filipinos are so hung up about, because they have nothing else to brag about. Individual “Pinoy Pride” is meaningless if we’re only highlighting our own goals and achievements, while the rest of the country suffers. We Filipinos need to learn what true humility, selflessness, and compassion means—instead of the pretentious act of these important human traits we put on, to get what we want from others. Finally, honestly admitting to our own self-serving and aristocratic nature… Read more »
LVM Malana
Guest

Well said, @Aeta. Filipinos are actually lead by examples they see around them, like children. It’s important that they themselves become good examples but this can’t be done without maturity and education that composed of discipline and open reception to learning.

Aeta
Guest
It’s still a longshot, @LVN Malana, for the Filipino people to divorce themselves from their “Pinoy Pride Chicken” mentalities, and to incorporate the idea of genuine humility, selflessness, and compassion to fix their dysfunctional cultural values. Historically, we cannot rely on our government to take the forefront in changing our people’s “every man for himself” attitude, since our self-serving and aristocratic leaders have all let us down more time than we care to remember. So the change has to take place at the “grassroot” level–from people like us–by waking our people up from their delusions that the Philippines, and its… Read more »
JRIgnacio
Guest
Yes! It’s all about the drama “the economy” we need more foreign investment etc… A 60% 40% ownership is there to protect the Filipino people! Imagine we allow foreign companies to own land and businesses 100%!? This will drive the prices too high that a ordinary Filipino can not afford to buy land or a house of his own! Even now at 60/40, inflation and prices of goods are skyrocketing! What we need is self reliance! What our government should do is to stop privatization, stop contractual jobs and invest in our own industries to drive our own local economy… Read more »
Go RICO
Guest

WOW, JRIgnacio. I totally agree. I am a Foreign Investor and I think the 60%-40% is great for Philippines.

Unfortunately, this is Philippines and the Dynasties and Oligarchs use the 60%-40% to their exclusive benefit and screw the people.

Also agree on Privatization. EPIRA and PPP is a scam. Capitalism without Competition= Corruption.

marius
Guest
JRignacio: I can’t tell whether you’re being serious or sarcastic. Assuming you’re serious: >> A 60% 40% ownership is there to protect the Filipino people! And how’s that working out for you? >> Imagine we allow foreign companies to own land and businesses 100%!? This will drive the prices too high that a ordinary Filipino can not afford to buy land or a house of his own! Why would it? You’re just buying into the myth that foreigners are free-spending, money-loaded idiots. No businessman will pay more than something is worth: that is, more than he can earn back from… Read more »
Nathan Mguyen
Guest

ok