Gay Marriage in the Philippines?

It seems that the Western World is going nuts with the success of the push to have gay marriage approved. It’s all over Facebook, Twitter and just about every other social media outlet. As of late, the craze has reached the Philippines and everyone has gotten themselves into quite a bit of a bind with the Church, the common people, the media and, of course, the LGBT community all running in circles over the issue. However, with everything that has happened so far, just what will it mean for the country if gay marriage is ever approved.

I, for one, would prefer to allow people to love who they want to love but, given the way typical Pinoys tend to screw up everything, I think I’ll to keep my reservations. I have always been tolerant of homosexuality, what with a number of my relatives being gay (pun intended) members of the LGBT community. However, when you take the behavior of the common Pinoy, the rabid nature of the local branches of religion and then add to that the conniving nature of the government and the inept legislative department, then all you really have is a good recipe for a disaster, a tragedy, a laughing stock or all three rolled into one.

samesexmarriage

Of course, allow me to offer some points of interest on why I seem more than a little reluctant to follow the example of the West:

Pinoys Are Abusers Of Freedom

There, I said it. Typical Pinoys clamor about “freedom” even though they understand so little of what it actually means. Take for instance how people like to talk about the Philippines being “free” after the EDSA Revolution even though we have very little to show even after being “free” for more than a few decades now.

Like I said, I am very much supportive of gay rights but we have to remember that a lot of the gays around here are typical Pinoys as well. Instead of earning respect, they simply demand it from others, leading to many complications. I once remember an incident in high school when one of my teachers reprimanded a gay classmate of mine for crossdressing and my classmate quickly resorted to accusing my teacher of being a homophobic bigot even though it was clear that my classmate was violating school regulations by not being in proper uniform.

The Potential For Massive Backlash (pun not intended for the last word)

While there are a growing number of people who support the LGBT community and some religious leaders also encourage tolerance and acceptance of them. Unfortunately, this doesn’t apply to everyone. There is still a sizeable number of people in the Philippines who have rather primitive views and a feudal mindset.

If we were to suddenly adapt gay marriage on a nation-wide scale, one can only wonder how the more primitive-minded population of the Philippines might react.

My Proposition On The Matter

Well, I don’t want to sound like a bigot, so here’s my suggestion:

Let’s do something similar to the United States and just allow it in one city for the time being until people get used to it. When society becomes more tolerant, we can move on to other cities and go on to approve it throughout the country as time goes on.

Also, in the spirit of tolerance, let us not try to force religious ministers to perform or accept gay marriage if they don’t want to. It would be more than a little hypocritical to force people to conform to something they don’t agree with.

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Post Author: Grimwald

I came that you may know PAIN and have it in abundance…

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23 Comments on "Gay Marriage in the Philippines?"

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not sure
Guest
Coming from a guy with acquaintances that are openly homosexuals(and some I suspect but they don’t admit it), I personally don’t support lgbt movements. Still being a homosexual doesn’t cross you off my “possibly a good dude/dudette list”. I don’t care who marries whom(or what?), I’m bothered why this is even illegal. Perhaps they don’t like the idea of two men or two women living together not being able to procreate the future bulk of cheap laborers? I just don’t understand, unlike alcohols or drugs which when abused can cause physical and mental harm, homosexual people doesn’t cause any harm… Read more »
Tank
Guest

Statutorily, the Family Code defines marriage between man and wife.

Constitutionally, gay marriage isn’t mentioned specifically but if you go by Fr.Bernas’ commentaries on the framers’ intent, the constitutional mandate to protect the family contemplates the traditional sense. So one could theoretically argue that gay marriage should not be allowed if he can argue that it is harmful to the concept of family.

So gay marriage probably will never happen here unless we change the constitution and we know that probably won’t happen for a very long time.

Kyle Vincent Vinluan
Guest

And even if same-sex marriage is made legal in the Philippines, I wonder if the Philippine society as a whole is ready to accept it.

Dave
Guest

Do Filipinos think the US is the beginning and end of ‘the Western World?’ Many countries have had same sex marriage for a while now, why all the discussion today?

Chris Angelique
Guest

We discussed the same-sex marriage issue today because US is seen as the most powerful country in the world as of today. Many countries especially the Third World patronize them. So any change or trend made by them will technically make these countries drool over it.

So why is it being disagreed by the Catholic Church and even most of the Filipinos?

Because not every “right” is always right.

Blu Ignacio
Guest

China na ang superpower. U.S. na ang may utang sa China.

MARRIAGE EQUALITY was approved NOT AS A RELIGIOUS RIGHT but as A LAW OF THE LAND. Get that? Rights such as enjoying tax deductions, immigration benefits, employment assistance and next of kin (for the children) and so on are RIGHTS that no Religion can bestow. Clearly, you didn’t know what you were talking about when you wrote “not every right is always right.”

THINK and re-think because hating and discriminating in the name of your God is just rich.

Chris Angelique
Guest

Going to the mass-scale, since most of the Filipinos are really freedom-abusive, chances are they can or will switch partners from one another once the “love” they once knew is gone. Since men, primarily, don’t have female reproductive system, they can actually express their love on the highest form which is sex, in an anal way. Could be a faster way of spreading diseases.

not sure
Guest

Marriage by itself doesn’t cause deseases. People can have sex outside of marriage.

Blu Ignacio
Guest

Even straight people have anal sex. Straight people are also promiscuous. One can also get STDs from a woman. Nag-iisip ka ba talaga?

Robert Haighton
Member

Blu,
you are correct. A lot of heterosexual couples have anal sex, even lesbian couples have anal sex using butt plugs and dildos.

022Hayden0077778Toro
Guest

It could be one way, to slow the exploding population in the Philippines. Homosexuals don’t reproduce. They recruit…

So, let them do their thing…

not sure
Guest

Exactly why I’m not against it. Agree with this twice.

staser
Guest
The homosexual lobby groups here in the US have become quite powerful. People have lost their jobs or have been sued just because their view doesn’t agree with their company’s support of the nationwide gay movement. Organizations like the Anti-Defamation League and the American Civil Liberties Union are pushing to have LGBT exposure in schools and churches. Right now it’s not about tolerance anymore, they want forced acceptance and acknowledgement everywhere. America, just like Europe, has become so liberal and politically correct you cannot even do or say anything that appears to criticize any minority group without severe repercussions. This… Read more »
47Hayden000775Toro
Guest

The Filipino Muslims have several legal wives. Filipino Christians/other religious affiliates, are legally married to one wife; but have several concubines (“Kabits”). Ask most of our political leaders…How many “wives” they have? That is, irrespective of their religious affiliation; if the have any religion, at all..

Robert Haighton
Member

Grimwald,
If I am not mistaken you are a single man. Meaning not married, right?
Now suppose that in 2016 you get a president stating that all single guys will be put in a ghetto, then what will you say and do?
Will you start shouting and screaming about your individual human rights? Or will you blindly follow the dictate of your new president?

Robert Haighton
Member

In 2001 the Netherlands was the first country in the world to legalize same sex marriages. And it didnt make us less economically and/or otherwise. So I really dont understand all the fuzz about human rights for gays and lesbians.

chris
Guest

Now that Ireland has legalised gay marriage Australia is discussing it. Some there are saying they should do it because Ireland did. Why should they legalise it just because other countries have? This is errant and dangerous logic.

Pallacertus
Guest

Australian urban society has a far more tolerant attitude towards LGBTs than either Ireland or the United States.

From Prada to Nganga
Guest

This I agree

chris
Guest

To illustrate my point let me use a simple example. Suppose Ireland legalised murder. Should Australia follow suit? Should we see a wave of similar law changes the world over? Or would murder still be wrong?

Whether or not to legalise gay marriage should not be based on what other countries are doing.

Pallacertus
Guest

To head off and defuse an obvious point of contention — no, chris isn’t equating same-sex marriage to murder, nor is he insinuating that same-sex marriage is harmful to society as a whole. At least not yet.

Pepe Rep
Guest
I did some comments on rappler.com after the SCOTUS ruling with some notes on the petition submitted to the Philippines Supreme Court, the Family Code and other issues I tied together with the dissenting opinions of the other justices. I’d like to share it here: “Our laws are clear. The Family Code only recognizes the marriage between a man and a woman,” presidential spokesman Herminio Coloma Jr said on June 26. “Same-sex marriage by Filipinos in a foreign country will not be recognized in the Philippines.” He said the Civil Code of the Philippines states that “laws relating to family… Read more »
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