Should the Philippines consider becoming a state of the Union?

I mean, think about it. Filipinos worship virtually everything American. They follow American showbiz, American sport (NBA in particular), mimic American accents, and bicker socially and politically, in a manner similar to Americans. Filipinos copied the American style of government and the concept of democracy wholesale. Filipinos are using (but hardly maintaining) what remains of American infrastructure that was built before and after the second World War. Filipinos also copied American consumerism.

Filipinos want the American Joe to take them away from their self-inflicted wretchedness. Filipinos flock to the United States in hopes of achieving a better life for themselves and their families. So, why not just bring America here by becoming a state of the Union? We’re virtually a US state in everything but name anyway.

Why bring this up now, in light of the recently concluded presidential elections in the United States? Filipinos also stayed glued to their TV’s and social media to follow their election blow-by-blow, by the way. Well, Puerto Rico, an unincorporated US territory, has just undergone a two-part referendum. The first part asks the citizens whether they want the relationship with the US to change. The second part gives those who said yes three options: statehood, sovereign free association (which allows more autonomy), and independence. Statehood garnered the most votes by 61 percent. Now that’s what you call voted by the majority; compare that with the measly 40-42 percent of the popular vote BS Aquino gathered which he and his flunkies packaged as an “overwhelming majority” and a “mandate of the people”.

Why don’t we admit this to ourselves: despite what the chattering classes say about how America’s well-being affects the rest of the world, or how concerned they are about how the leader of the only remaining superpower in the world will approach foreign relations, etc., there are actually more practical underlying reasons why Filipinos are fixated on things American, especially the recently concluded elections. I summarized these in a comment of mine on that very same article:

National defense – Filipinos need US military intervention in their neck of the woods, even if they will not admit it or say otherwise in public. The Philippine army appears utterly incapable of defending our territories from external threats. Hell, they can’t even quell internal threats that well, and without incurring huge troop losses!

The US Dollar – Philippine Peso exchange rate – It’s not hard to guess that Filipinos prefer a high exchange rate, say something to the tune of 50-60 pesos to the dollar. They would rather have it that the money that stateside kababayans send home will be worth more here. Apart from that, there are Filipinos who have sidelines involving businesses or people in the US, so they’ll get paid in dollars. Naturally, they want more bang for their buck.

Besides, people carry US dollars simply because it’s a reference currency in the international monetary system.

The flow of US goods to the palamunins (freeloaders) back home – Imagine if America, for some reason or another, suddenly became tighter on immigration and admission of foreign nationals into American territories. Filipinos will find it harder to send and obtain sustento from the land of the “free”, the land of milk and honey.

Bottom line is that Filipinos want to make sure that the leech stays firmly attached to the host. Where the master goes, the spoiled brat dog with the outstretched tongue will follow.

Admission to the Union presents a solution to the three concerns above.

By becoming a state, US bases are virtually guaranteed here. Naturally, the federal government needs to help the state defend its territory from all threats. Our geographical position in south-east Asia also affords the US one of the best positions to keep tabs on its chief economic rival, China. It also affords them a chance to follow leads into terrorist groups alleged to have links within the Philippines. Can you imagine how good the Americans will have it here in terms of gathering intelligence?

As a state, the Philippines will now use the US Dollar as its official currency. No more worrying over converting to the peso and deeming it worthless. No more considering US goods expensive because now we’ll gain even better access to them. The sustento will come much easier, and cheaper. The palamunins will have their fill of US goods up to their eyeballs. No more having to suffer endless lines and failed interviews for that much coveted blue passport; everyone in the Philippines will have one. No more wishing for the locals that the white American will come to their shores either; they will come, if only to initially satisfy their curiosity about this potential newest entry into the Union. Whether they stay long-term or not, is entirely up to us.

I very much doubt, though, that this will go over easy with local politicians and oligarchs. They pretty much want the whole pie of influence over the Philippine scene kept to themselves. I warrant a guess that American politicians and businesses, when they come over here after we’re admitted into the Union, have a bigger and better chance of running the Philippines better and in the interest of the people then those oligarchs ever will.

The road to statehood isn’t that simple, though. Concurrent with conducting a referendum on becoming a state of the Union is conducting a referendum on whether Visayas and Mindanao want to remain part of the Philippines if it is admitted. After all, BS Aquino has shown that he is all too willing to give away parts of the Mindanao and ARMM to the Moro Islamic Liberation front; perhaps other regions have an equal claim to self-rule too. The unitary central government in Imperial Manila appears little concerned about Visayas and Mindanao anyway, except come election time and when there are prominent sycophants from those regions. They seem perfectly capable of governing themselves even without much intervention from Imperial Manila; the question is do they want to secede from an entity that is looking more and more like a failed state with each passing day? However, I don’t see it making logical sense for Cordillera, a landlocked region, to exclude itself from the rest of Luzon should they decide to become a state of the Union. Sorry guys, you’re going to have to come with us.

Add to that the deliberations and discussions that the US Congress will have to go through with this, and I say that the road looks bumpier and bleaker than ever.

There’s a question that needs to be asked: what would be the benefit to the Union to admit us? Well, as I mentioned above, the federal government will be able to have a bird’s eye view of what’s happening around Asia, especially China. They’ll also have better access to information about anti-US groups with alleged links in the region; that is, if they can manage their sources. They will also have access to the abundant natural resources present in the islands; perhaps they’ll take better care of them too than what Filipinos have done. Let’s not neglect to mention that with our large and ever-growing population, I’m guessing that the Philippines will become a heavily contested state come election time. I’m pretty sure we have a bigger population than California, even without Visayas and Mindanao. If California is worth 55 electoral votes, the most among all the states, imagine how many the Philippines will be worth.

To our American expatriate friends, you may find this sort of discussion of the Philippines considering becoming a state of the Union appalling. Let me make it clear that this whole thing is more of a thought exercise than an actual call for Filipinos to consider admission into the Union. No doubt quite a few of you preferred to settle here to escape whatever it is you didn’t like about American society. However, I’m pretty sure many of you were shocked/surprised to find out that Filipinos act like mini-me Americans; it’s as if you never left. Besides, with things as they are here, this won’t happen anytime soon. You’ve got to admit though, this thought exercise was fun!

As for us Filipinos, well, we’ll just have to keep dreaming. We want a better future for ourselves? Stop voting in incompetent and undeserving officials. Stop acting like a victim. Stop blaming everyone else but yourselves for wrong decisions. Stop propagating the palamunin culture. Stop putting your self-interests above the common good. Stop the culture of crab mentality and bad pakikisama Stop acting like onion-skinned crybabies with big egos. Stop demanding respect and start earning it. Stop the culture of mistrust.

We should strive for a Philippines that can stand on its own but better integrated into the international community. Once the Philippines can stand on its own two feet, we have a reason to be truly proud of ourselves.

[Photo courtesy: US Observer]

print

About FallenAngel

А вы, друзья, как ни садитесь, все в музыканты не годитесь. – But you, my friends, however you sit, not all as musicians fit.

Post Author: FallenAngel

А вы, друзья, как ни садитесь, все в музыканты не годитесь. – But you, my friends, however you sit, not all as musicians fit.

Leave a Reply

130 Comments on "Should the Philippines consider becoming a state of the Union?"

Notify of
avatar
Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
MidwayHaven
Guest
I’m a bit tepid about US statehood for the Philippine Islands; a more realistic process would be having parts of the nation becoming unincorporated territories, sort of like Guam or the Northern Marianas. Also, having the entire Philippines as a US state at this point in time would be a logistical nightmare, considering our current population (100 million people; that’s probably around 120 electoral ballots which would often go Republican) and the long-term repercussions of the Great Recession. In the statehood scenario, what I could see is certain portions of the islands re-admitted to Commonwealth status (maybe the Visayan Islands,… Read more »
MidwayHaven
Guest

[imgcomment image[/img]

MidwayHaven
Guest

Oops, sorry about that. I was supposed to present an image, but I think I got the codes wrong.

Bill Steffen
Guest
No thank you. We already have enough people in America on Welfare. Think about it. If Filipinos were suddenly given access to the US Welfare system, who would want to work? The folks in America that are getting somewhere around 40 grand a year in assistance have it pretty good. Filipinos would think they died and went to heaven. But just saying, yeah I have no problems with Philippine Statehood. This country has so much potential it is staggering. Alas the powers that be won’t let that happen as they prefer Juan to be their slave.
Johnny Saint
Guest

Bill,

If by some fluke this pipe dream actually happens, you ought to run for governor. And when you win, your first act as head of state ought to be seceding from the union. 😉

Bill Steffen
Guest

Louisiana, Texas, and Arizona are considering this as we speak, with Wyoming expected to get on board also.

Johnny Saint
Guest

I’m sympathetic to Arizona and Texas. The liberal pricks in Washington and California have done nothing to control the invasion of drug dealing gangsters from across the river. In fact I heard about a program out of Berkeley that provides assistance in the form of food, water and GPS devices and cellular phones to people crossing the desert. Supposedly for pure humanitarian reasons. To my mind if you assist any group whose main export into your country is drugs and violence, it isn’t a humanitarian gesture, its treason.

Bill Steffen
Guest

Yeah I agree, but back home the folks have gone slap crazy.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Seems to me a lot of them need a slap upside the head…

aris
Guest
I hope this thought exercise of yours just keeps being as it is, an exercise. Becoming a state of the U.S. is a very bad idea since they are demolishing their constitution and that you don’t want especially those drone strikes that they are willing to use on American citizens. Being a state doesn’t mean you can vote also. We should just stick to what we have right now and work to make things better by striving to become smarter entrepreneurs until we can be really independent. Our country may not be good right now but by joining the U.S.… Read more »
Minsk
Guest

An even better scenario is if China decides to occupy and incorporate the islands into their territory. No doubt they’ll make the poor bums work in their sweatshops and have foreign investment revive again, turning it into a second Hong Kong.

Of course, this wouldn’t fly either because of the Filipinos obsessive love of all things Western and democratic.

Trosp
Guest

@FA,

It has been tried before by presidential candidate Cabangbang for Philippine’s statehood (51st state)if he’s elected president. He has more than 50% membership of voters for his program but has garnered only 3% vote during that presidential election against the incumbent Marcos.

ardeend
Guest

It is more convenient really for the US to keep as a semi-colony, so basically we’re friends with benefits with the US but without the hassle of being committed.

Bill Steffen
Guest

Thats kind of a one way proposition, don’t you think. The American people would not go for that in a thousand years. We already have enough ” I, Mes” in America.

ChinoF
Member

I liked this idea of being a state of the US, and I still like it now. I agree it would be beneficial. Too bad Manuel Quezon doused the flames on this one. Just remember the infamous, perhaps careless words: “I would rather see the Philippines run like hell by Filipinos than run like heaven by Americans!” That was pride seizing the tongue and making it careless.

Joseph
Guest

Go to the US and be part of their sinking Economy.

jtw724
Guest

Are you suggesting the Philippine economy is thriving? I live in lapu lapu and I see much poverty.

Legati
Guest

Most of the people in Puerto Rico said, Yes!

Johnny Saint
Guest
The idea is absurd. From a practical standpoint the US would not even begin to consider it. Bill Steffen touched on it already. You have over 300 million in the US now. Annexing the Philippines will add approximately 100 million more mouths to feed. Something akin to German unification circa 1989-1991. In the 1980’s West Germany was a high-flying economic miracle. People actually asked the question “Can Germany afford to pay its workforce NOT to work?” At least part of the week anyway. That’s how much money was coming into Germany. Then the Berlin Wall came down and with it… Read more »
Hyden Toro
Guest
Oldtimer Filipinos living here in the U.S.; will tell what happened to Filipinos; who came in the U.S., during the CommonWealth era. When we were part of the U.S. They flocked to the U.S. Like the Mexicans are doing now, by climbing the U.S.-Mexico border fence, in order to find menial jobs. They toiled in the vegetable fields in California. They got discriminated in pay, and of the color of their skins. Most have no jobs, and they went to the bread lines, just to eat for the day. It was time of economic depression in the U.S. The Governor… Read more »
Bill Steffen
Guest

The States of Colorado and Washington just voted to legalize Marijuana. If the Federal Government says No to this it will step in with arrests and prosecutions, No matter what the Governor says. The states have no rights anymore. The Federal Government has usurped their Authority.

Ken
Guest
I have an option….maybe the Provincial areas should be allowed to operate like states which will be more self sufficient in their government, economies and so forth and put more responsibilities on those Provinces and it’s people rather than the National Government which at times seems so remote, out of touch and far away and in reality can’t be the answer to all problems! Just a thought! Also, I read so much about folks in this culture having something or someone to believe in…..bottom line I believe is you got believe in ones self! Folks have to take and accept… Read more »
Josh
Guest

You’re right there, individuals need to step up and make sacrifices not just for one’s self but for the many. People put so much effort in to pleasing themselves rather than make for collective efforts to please everyone. All it takes is for the idea to spread like contagion, I guess education is really key. Too bad the administration just cut billions from the budget for SUCs.

Thomas Jefferson
Guest
I have not decided yet. A wish list I would like to see for our country: 1. The creation of an Anti-Dictatorship Law in the Republic of the Philippines. This should include mandatory psychiatric testing and evaluation of all our candidates in the national level and local governments. Such proven psychiatric illness in public office shall be a ground for removal of any elected or appointed official. 2. The end of oligarch control of traditional politicians, political dynasties and business monopolies. This includes the creation of penal laws punishing acts of political expediency, opportunism and circuses. 3. Government and private… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
There have been a lot of comments here waxing philosophical about self-sacrifice and believing in oneself and blah-blah-blah. And there have been comments about how Filipinos should pass a law for this concern and that grievance and how oligarchies should be dismantled and on and on and on…. Hovering in the background of all these posts is the commentators’ desire to find some way to facilitate American management over Filipino affairs. WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH YOU? The Philippines isn’t a protectorate or colony of the US. But apparently the thinking is still stuck in what Erap Estrada calls… Read more »
Trosp
Guest
@Johnny S I’ll just nit picked 20% of your comment and let this takes care of the remaining 80% of it. According to you – “Going further, why should our national defense dependent on the US?” This has been he case and we have no problems with it. It’s a mutual agreement with US of A. Just like what they have in Japan and South Korea. Why would us be a special case. This Spratly issue, do you think this will be an issue if the US Seventh Fleet is still around in that area? We kicked them out if… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
Apparently sarcasm doesn’t convey well in my writing. And I made a mistake in assuming that everyone is familiar with the nature of the mutual defense treaty. Okay, here we go. Let’s see if I still remember what I learned in high school Philippine history. The Philippine-US Mutual Defense Treaty (MDT) contains, I believe, 7-8 articles that specify that both nations would support each other should there be an attack on either from an external source. The language states that this “support action” will be IN ACCORDANCE WITH EACH COUNTRY’S CONSTITUTIONAL PROCESSES. This provision is the key. Furthermore, the MDT… Read more »
Trosp
Guest

@J. Saint

You’ve commented –

“If you bothered to do a little checking, the US 7th Fleet IS DEPLOYED IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. At any given time, even operating out of Japan and Guam, US forces are approximately 1-2 weeks from any possible conflict area in the region. Ships on deployment make regular stops in Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Australia and yes, even the Philippines that kicked them out.”

Maybe you must check how the Midway and Enterprise entered the Philippine sea during the coup de etat against the Cory Aquino regime. Check how fast they have reacted.

http://www.history.navy.mil/pubs/Ready%20Seapower_A%20History%20of%20the%20US%207th%20Fleet.pdf

Check page 100.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Are we comparing the failed Enrile coup to an invasion by the People’s Liberation Army? They aren’t even in the same universe.

Johnny Saint
Guest
I think you’re missing the point. The question isn’t whether or not the US has the capability to retaliate. The question is whether or not it would do so in the face of aggression from a nuclear power. Their action 20 years ago cannot compare to the current geopolitical situation. Given the policies of the Clinton and Obama presidencies, I submit that we cannot place blind faith in immediate military support from the US. (Obama could not even protect his ambassador) As such it behooves us to devlop our own defense capability independent of the United States as provided by… Read more »
Bill Steffen
Guest

You got that right Johnny. If you think for a minute that Obama will turn on his Commie buddies, you better think again. Unicorns poop skittles and pee kool aid too.

Trosp
Guest
@J. Saint “Are we comparing the failed Enrile coup to an invasion by the People’s Liberation Army? They aren’t even in the same universe.” My rejoinder is about your comment – “If you bothered to do a little checking, the US 7th Fleet IS DEPLOYED IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. At any given time, even operating out of Japan and Guam, US forces are approximately 1-2 weeks from any possible conflict area in the region.” Meaning, it’s not correct that I didn’t do a little checking and to also explain to you that it is not true that US forces (we’re discussing… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest
You are still incapable of simple comprehension. Definition of CONCLUSION — A judgment or decision reached after deliberation. The data regarding the US 7th Fleet deployment are just that — part of the body of facts used to formulate the CONCLUSION. This is not the conclusion itself. I’ll point it out again. I have always acknowledged that the US is capable of responding to a destabilizing threat in Southeast Asia. I NEVER implied that they have left the region. This threat is likely to originate from Chinese diplomatic and military aggression. That is not the issue. The conclusion I drew… Read more »
Bill Steffen
Guest

I gotta say it Johnny…… You hit the nail right on the head.

Trosp
Guest
@J. Saint Let’s arrange our comments in its proper chronological arrangement and context. JS: Going further, why should our national defense dependent on the US? Trosp: This has been he case and we have no problems with it. It’s a mutual agreement with US of A. Just like what they have in Japan and South Korea. Why would us be a special case. This Spratly issue, do you think this will be an issue if the US Seventh Fleet is still around in that area? We kicked them out if you can still recall it. (The 7th Fleet was deployed… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest

Still you continue to discuss the 7th fleet, a topic which was never the main point of my posted comment. And geopolitical realities that were valid 20 years ago; very different from the situation we face today. Please read the last response I made (dated 15 November) carefully. The comment has always been about the willingness of the US to respond. I do not know how I can make it clearer.

Trosp
Guest

@J. Saint

As of now you still can’t comprehend that what we’re discussing is your “Going further, why should our national defense dependent on the US?” comment.

Are you that stupid?

Johnny Saint
Guest
Now you’re just being offensive. And still unable to comprehend the point I was making. I will reiterate. I NEVER SAID THE UNITED STATES MILITARY WAS UNABLE TO RESPOND TO A POSSIBLE THREAT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. I have cited material from their own navy that indicates their capability to act in a crisis. What I have always maintained is that GIVEN THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION IN THE US THERE ARE GRAVE DOUBTS IN THIS REGION THAT THEY WOULD COMMIT THEIR TROOPS IMMEDIATELY, IF IT ALL, TO A CONFLICT POSSIBLY INVOLVING NUCLEAR ARMS. Because American commitment to their global obligations fluctuates depending… Read more »
Trosp
Guest

@J. Saint

Don’t you have any shame in accusing somebody’s comment as offensive?

That proves that you can’t even comprehend the offensiveness of your own comments (by your yardstick).

Seriously, your comprehension sucks…

I rest my case.

Johnny Saint
Guest
Trosp, Did it not even occur to you that the last comment I made was about your degeneration into name calling? I will say it again…my answers as to why the Philippines should develop a defense strategy independent of the United States has always been consistent as have the reasons behind my post. You have been obsessed with the reaction time of the US Navy and other minutiae that I even acknowledged and were never the object of my discussion in the first place. You continuously bring up these points without offering an alternative to my thesis which was about… Read more »
Bill Steffen
Guest

Sigh, the point is moot anyway Johnny. If worse comes to worst Obama will do what he always does. Nothing.

Trosp
Guest

@J. Saint

What name calling???

Have I labeled you as anything offensive???

Really, I have to rest my case.

Talk is cheap.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Trosp,

You are denying posted this?

“Are you that stupid?”

So now you are back-tracking? Apparently we should add poltroon to your appellations. Since you cannot own up to your own post.

Or perhaps its a medical condition. Some kind of congenital disorder maybe that causes you to forget things?

Johnny Saint
Guest
Apparently Trosp, its still you missing the point. Don’t you understand it yet? Given the official policies of past and current US administrations, it is unlikely that they will immediately deploy military elements to engage if the Chinese decided to take the Spratlys or even the Philippines. As President Obama has stated since his first campaign for the US presidency and through official White House statements regarding foreign policy, he will not commit US forces, preferring instead to have the UN Security Council resolve any (regional) conflicts. Furthermore, since China holds significant sway on the Security Council, it is unlikely… Read more »
Trosp
Guest
@J. Saint Let’s review my comment. My rejoinder is about your comment – “If you bothered to do a little checking, the US 7th Fleet IS DEPLOYED IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. At any given time, even operating out of Japan and Guam, US forces are approximately 1-2 weeks from any possible conflict area in the region.” (BTW, how did you know I didn’t bother to check?) My response was – Maybe you must check how the Midway and Enterprise entered the Philippine sea during the coup de etat against the Cory Aquino regime. Check how fast they have reacted. http://www.history.navy.mil/pubs/Ready%20Seapower_A%20History%20of%20the%20US%207th%20Fleet.pdf Check… Read more »
Trosp
Guest
BTW, You did not cite the link from your comment – “As I have said before on this site, one should have facts available before making statements. The estimate of anywhere from a few days up to two weeks to fully deploy US naval forces is based on the fact that at any given time, 50% of the US 7th Fleet are deployed at sea throughout their area of responsibility (as per various US Navy sites). The US Navy’s own estimates place their forward contingent operating out of Japan and Guam 17 days closer to locations in Asia than any… Read more »
Trosp
Guest
Johnny Saint
Guest
Trosp, Did it not even occur to you that the last comment I made was about your degeneration into name calling? I will say it again…my answers as to why the Philippines should develop a defense strategy independent of the United States has always been consistent as have the reasons behind my post. You have been obsessed with the reaction time of the US Navy and other minutiae that I even acknowledged and were never the object of my discussion in the first place. You continuously bring up these points without offering an alternative to my thesis which was about… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest

Correction, I quoted the wrong company name. Its actually CHIKKA.com. (Where the hell did I come up with “TSIKA?”)

Johnny Saint
Guest
Now you’re just being offensive. And still unable to comprehend the point I was making. I will reiterate. I NEVER SAID THE UNITED STATES MILITARY WAS UNABLE TO RESPOND TO A POSSIBLE THREAT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. I have cited material from their own navy that indicates their capability to act in a crisis. What I have always maintained is that GIVEN THE CURRENT ADMINISTRATION IN THE US THERE ARE GRAVE DOUBTS IN THIS REGION THAT THEY WOULD COMMIT THEIR TROOPS IMMEDIATELY, IF IT ALL, TO A CONFLICT POSSIBLY INVOLVING NUCLEAR ARMS. Because American commitment to their global obligations fluctuates depending… Read more »
Johnny Saint
Guest

Trosp,

You are denying posted this?

“Are you that stupid?”

So now you are back-tracking? Apparently we should add poltroon to your appellations. Since you cannot own up to your own post.

Or perhaps its a medical condition. Some kind of congenital disorder maybe that causes you to forget things?

Libertas
Guest

you can always tell someones character by how they eat oysters, and from what i have seen here, it is greedy, uncouth, and uneducated, so i dont think the civilised world would be interested in adopting a backward child.

Bill Steffen
Guest

LOL

Johnny Saint
Guest

I think we ought to be judged based on how we prepare and eat snails.

Johnny Saint
Guest

And BALUT 😀

Thomas Jefferson
Guest

Sixto Brillantes believes in the possibility of speedy polls. The Daily Tribune says the opposite:

http://www.tribune.net.ph/index.php/commentary/item/6745-expect-fraud-filled-polls

Thomas Jefferson
Guest
Libertas
Guest

I think filipinos, because they suffer from such an inferiority complex – earnt over 50 years of non-achievement – want to try and bolster their self esteem vicariously by co-dependently attaching themselves to anyone from the west as a symbol of intellect and success, which they will never achieve alone.
Unfortunately it is one way traffic.
Respect needs to be earnt and filipino politicians are the country’s worst ambassadors for the image of greed, corruption, stupidity, and laziness.

RF Garcia
Guest
What is so so wrong about Americans and America?Is it so bad and harmful to us if we adopt their good traits? For that matter can not we imitate the other good traits of other nations? For example, the Germans have that thoroughness and great attention for details which makes their products of unique quality. The Japanese have that intense nationalist devotion for their country. The French are world famous for the quality of their wine. Etc, etc. The so called ultra nationalists have for decades pounded us with the urgings that anything American is bad. Of course, not everything… Read more »
Aegis-Judex
Guest

“The so called ultra nationalists have for decades pounded us with the urgings that anything American is bad.”

My retort to them:

“What of anything from China?” 😀

Joseph
Guest

Beacuse they own a trillion debt? and Currently the Philippines doesnt have one? the reason why we are able to lend a millino dollar. So why be part of a sinking ship?

Bill Steffen
Guest

Actually the real debt is more like 16 Trillion. But even with that debt the Philippines still gets it’s US Foreign aid.

Johnny Saint
Guest

Projected to be $20 Trillion by the time Obama leaves office in 2016-17 if it isn’t resolved. God only knows how bad it will get if Biden gets elected.

Bill Steffen
Guest

Yeah that’s a scary thought.

s.k.
Guest

If the Philippines became a state they would have to follow rules. This seems to be a real problem for Filipino’s.

Gogs
Member

Americans will take one look at Quiapo and renege on the deal.